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NEWS
June 23, 1993
The auditorium of Loch Raven High School has been the scene of some rowdy public meetings over the years. But tonight, as Baltimore County school system officials, teachers and parents gather at Loch Raven to air their differences, they could make those previous meetings look like kindergarten tea parties by comparison.This evening's confab was organized by County Executive Roger Hayden, in response to the mounting criticism of School Superintendent Stuart Berger by parents, school employees and others who believe he's changing the system too rapidly and with a my-way-or-the-highway arrogance that adds galling insult to injury.
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NEWS
January 21, 2010
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Transportation Security Administration abruptly withdrew his name Wednesday as Democratic and Republican senators exchanged charges of politicizing the key security post. The dispute over Erroll Southers, a senior Los Angeles Police Department official, had intensified since a Nigerian man was accused of trying to blow up a Northwest Airlines plane bound for Detroit from Amsterdam on Christmas Day. Southers, a former FBI agent, issued an unusually bitter public statement about the months-long hold on his nomination by South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint and other Republican senators who are opposed to collective bargaining at the TSA. "It is apparent that this path has been obstructed by political ideology," Southers said in a statement released by the White House.
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NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht | November 27, 1991
I keep waiting for Bob Greene to wink.You remember Bob Greene. Rookie head football coach from Milford Mill High School. Good strategist, great talker. Excellent motivator, even if he sometimes assists his opponents.As his players walked slowly toward the team bus Saturday at Wilde Lake -- the taste of a 42-0 trouncing fresh in their mouths, a promising season derailed in the Class 1A semifinals by a Wildecats team that has not lost in two years -- Greene reflected on "the comments."A week before, Greene made some interesting pronouncements, whichseemed on the surface almost made in jest.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
When Duncan Mackay, a journalist and co-author of a coming book on China's Olympic bid, ran with the Olympic torch through London on Sunday, scores of demonstrators converged on him, shouting their conflicting views about China's hosting of the Summer Games. "It was like running between two gangs, really," said Mackay, referring to the people protesting Chinese treatment of Tibet and other human rights abuses and their detractors, tempers flaring like the torch. "One of my friends had children there between the ages of 7 and 13, and for them it was quite frightening."
NEWS
August 7, 1996
WHY DID an 18th century architect opt for an 800-pound wooden structure in the shape of an acorn at the top of the Maryland State House dome? Now that it has deteriorated badly over 208 years, why replace the acorn?There are good answers to both questions. That acorn may look decorative but it is an integral part of the dome that soars high over Annapolis. It provides the stability for the State House lightning rod. Not just an ordinary lightning rod, either, but the world's largest working Franklin rod -- following inventor-statesman Benjamin Franklin's precise design.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Joycelyn Elders, President Clinton's nominee for surgeon general, this week proudly wore the token of her fiery battle to change public policy on sex -- a lapel pin emblazoned with a tiny lightning bolt."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
When Duncan Mackay, a journalist and co-author of a coming book on China's Olympic bid, ran with the Olympic torch through London on Sunday, scores of demonstrators converged on him, shouting their conflicting views about China's hosting of the Summer Games. "It was like running between two gangs, really," said Mackay, referring to the people protesting Chinese treatment of Tibet and other human rights abuses and their detractors, tempers flaring like the torch. "One of my friends had children there between the ages of 7 and 13, and for them it was quite frightening."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
A properly installed lightning protection system could have shielded the First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church from Tuesday's lightning strike, according to one of the nation's top experts in the field. "Thirty percent of all fires in church buildings are caused by lightning. And guess why? Steeples," said Martin A. Uman, co-director of the Lightning Research Laboratory at the University of Florida in Gainesville. And that's why most church buildings have protection. Witnesses said Tuesday's bolt ignited a blaze in the wooden spire that rose above First Mount Olive's stone bell tower.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | January 15, 1995
75 Years Ago* A bill has been introduced in the Maryland House providing for the enlargement of the grounds of the Naval Academy at Annapolis. A $75,000 appropriation is being requested for the purchase of 302 acres of land on the opposite side of the Severn. -- The Sun, Feb. 6, 1920.* A 16-foot length and two piles of the northwest fender of the Severn River bridge at Annapolis have been carried away by the ice. The bridge itself is in bad shape but it is felt that enough will stand against the ice to await repairs in the spring.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - For the past four years, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz's appearances before Congress have often been punctuated by sharp, partisan exchanges over Iraq policy and the Bush administration's overall handling of the campaign against terrorism. Yesterday, something quite different happened when Wolfowitz's designated successor, Navy Secretary Gordon R. England, sat down before the Senate Armed Services Committee for his confirmation hearing. Senators from both parties praised the West Baltimore native as a savvy business manager.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
A properly installed lightning protection system could have shielded the First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church from Tuesday's lightning strike, according to one of the nation's top experts in the field. "Thirty percent of all fires in church buildings are caused by lightning. And guess why? Steeples," said Martin A. Uman, co-director of the Lightning Research Laboratory at the University of Florida in Gainesville. And that's why most church buildings have protection. Witnesses said Tuesday's bolt ignited a blaze in the wooden spire that rose above First Mount Olive's stone bell tower.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter, Alia Malik and Julie Turkewitz and Gadi Dechter, Alia Malik and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporters | July 12, 2007
When the smoke finally cleared, the beloved 140-year-old house of worship emerged roofless but standing -- and West Baltimore church leaders expressed hope yesterday that it could be reborn. "The structure is solid, and the walls we believe to be solid, according to the [city] inspector," said Bishop Oscar E. Brown of First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church. "Based upon the projections given up until this point, we won't have to demolish." The Formstone-clad church in the 800 block of W. Saratoga St. caught fire Tuesday after a bolt of lightning struck the steeple, which soon toppled onto the adjoining roof.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | January 31, 2007
Miami -- In an atmosphere he couldn't possibly have enjoyed, Tank Johnson was about as convincing as he could have been. With the exception of convincing his audience that he didn't actually have a cache of guns that a militia would envy taken from his suburban Chicago home last month. And convincing it that he's not headed toward the same violent end as his best friend, whom Johnson called his brother, not long afterward. And convincing it that Johnson's presence at the Super Bowl in light of all of this is fair and acceptable.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - For the past four years, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz's appearances before Congress have often been punctuated by sharp, partisan exchanges over Iraq policy and the Bush administration's overall handling of the campaign against terrorism. Yesterday, something quite different happened when Wolfowitz's designated successor, Navy Secretary Gordon R. England, sat down before the Senate Armed Services Committee for his confirmation hearing. Senators from both parties praised the West Baltimore native as a savvy business manager.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
IN THE HALLS of the U.S. Capitol and the chambers of the United Nations, President Bush's nomination of John R. Bolton as ambassador to the United Nations has caused quite a stir. And rightly so. Given the political hotspots around the world and rapidly changing events in the Middle East, this is hardly the time for such a divisive figure. Many consider Mr. Bolton ill-suited for the job and too disdainful of compromise to be effective. His supporters see his appointment as supremely sensible, but the Los Angeles Times characterized him as "America's least-liked diplomat."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
If Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. wanted a transportation secretary who would lie low and steer clear of the political fray, he certainly would have found someone other than Robert L. Flanagan. For 16 years as a Republican delegate in Annapolis, Flanagan earned a reputation as a partisan pit bull with an unmatched gift for savaging Maryland's ruling Democrats. But now Flanagan finds himself on the defensive over the departure of the top official at the port of Baltimore - with business executives joining Democrats in questioning Flanagan's performance in office.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama's nominee to head the Transportation Security Administration abruptly withdrew his name Wednesday as Democratic and Republican senators exchanged charges of politicizing the key security post. The dispute over Erroll Southers, a senior Los Angeles Police Department official, had intensified since a Nigerian man was accused of trying to blow up a Northwest Airlines plane bound for Detroit from Amsterdam on Christmas Day. Southers, a former FBI agent, issued an unusually bitter public statement about the months-long hold on his nomination by South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint and other Republican senators who are opposed to collective bargaining at the TSA. "It is apparent that this path has been obstructed by political ideology," Southers said in a statement released by the White House.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
After 208 years crowning the Annapolis skyline, the decorative acorn at the top of the Maryland State House dome will have to be replaced, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend announced yesterday.Townsend, who chairs the State House Trust, said the state's Department of General Services has concluded that there is no practical way to restore the 5-foot-8-inch-tall wooden structure and its supporting pedestal."In order to restore it, we would have to take out so much of the wood and replace it with epoxy that we would have to destroy it in order to save it," said Eugene R. Lynch, secretary of general services.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2004
NEW YORK -- The end of a Dick Cheney stump speech can be jarring. The vice president speaks quietly for 25 minutes, sounding like a professor plodding through a lecture. Then, as he politely thanks his audience, machines shoot confetti, music blares and balloons tumble from above. It's a sudden reminder that this is the campaign trail, not class time in a college auditorium. Cheney has never been described as flashy or exuberant. In 2000, George W. Bush was not seeking such traits in a lieutenant.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony Williams strides into the community meeting all business, no handshakes, no Pepsodent smile. "As I look out in the room ... " he begins, a curious way to start since he hasn't actually looked into the room yet. So far, he has only looked at his notes. Soon the questions come. Can he fix a crumbling retaining wall? What will he do with a dilapidated recreation center? When will more senior citizen housing get built? He shoots back statistics and instructs his staff to follow up, answering every question until his audience finally tuckers out. Nobody seems too spellbound, but not a single person complains about his performance in the job running the District of Columbia, either.
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