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Lightning Bolt

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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
A bolt of lightning struck and killed a South Baltimore man during yesterday afternoon's wind-whipped rainstorm, which had torn the roof off an East Baltimore house less than an hour earlier, officials said.The storm dumped 1.2 inches of rain at Baltimore-Washington International Airport from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., caused traffic accidents statewide and stripped 19,000 Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers of power, according to officials. About 1,200 remained without power last night.
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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 23, 2005
IF THERE was any doubt that Baltimore is the home office for weather wimps, that should be about gone now. Look, we all know people freak out about snow around here. Mention snow is on the way, and you might as well set off the air-raid sirens, too, as people scramble to get to the supermarket and home before the coming nuclear winter hits. But now we freak out about rain, too. In fact, in terms of inducing panic, rain has become the new snow. Now we get the same kind of end-of-the-world TV and radio coverage for rain as we do for snow: the First Warning Weather alerts, potential inch counts, reporters in foul-weather gear doing stand-ups against a backdrop of bumper-to-bumper traffic and beating windshield wipers, shots of BGE trucks on standby in case the power lines start snapping, etc. Case in point: I'm in my car last week, listening to a talk show on the radio, when suddenly they break in with a news bulletin.
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
A bolt of lightning struck and killed a South Baltimore man during yesterday afternoon's wind-whipped rainstorm, which had torn the roof off an East Baltimore house less than an hour earlier, officials said.The storm dumped 1.2 inches of rain at Baltimore-Washington International Airport from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., caused traffic accidents statewide and stripped 19,000 Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers of power, according to officials. Most had regained power early last night.Gene Steele, 35, of Bridgeview Road was standing under a tree outside 905 Veronica Ave. about 3:30 p.m. when a lightning bolt struck the tree, then hit him and knocked him to the ground, according to police Sgt. Larry Bray of the Southern District.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
There were abrasions on his knees and elbows, and his back might ache a bit today, but Annapolis' Joshua Johnson expected nothing less after a hard night's work. The 6-foot-6 inside force scored 22 points and grabbed 10 of his 17 rebounds in the first half as fourth-ranked Annapolis pulled away from a hard-playing, 15th-ranked Long Reach squad, 57-46, last night in a Class 3A East region quarterfinal. Tomorrow, the Panthers (22-1), who are in search of their 23rd berth in the state semifinals, play River Hill, which beat Severna Park, 57-36, last night.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
Lightning struck at least three times during a heavy rainstorm in Carroll County about 3 p.m. yesterday.Two houses on Sandymount Road were apparently hit by lightning but suffered only minor damage, according to their owners.Cindy Parr of the 2600 block of Sandymount Road said she was talking on the telephone when she heard a loud noise and then buzzing on the line.Firefighters from the Reese station later determined the buzzing sound was coming from the microwave oven in the kitchen, which was not in operation at the time of the storm.
NEWS
By Chet Dembeck | October 4, 1990
I REMEMBER the night the brown shirts rallied in Patterson Park. They called themselves the State's Rights Party, and they marched in goosestep, each wearing an arm band with its bizarre lightning bolt insignia.I think they would have preferred a swastika, but at that time, in the early '60s, the memory of our costly struggle with Nazi Germany was still fresh enough in the minds of working-class East Baltimoreans. Even these neo-Nazis had to be careful.I was an eighth-grade student at St. Elizabeth's, which stood adjacent to the park, and I remember Sister Regina warning us to stay home that evening.
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
A 10-year-old Annapolis boy injured by lightning last week returned home yesterday to his family -- and pet turtles -- after a doctor in Baltimore said his progress exceeded her expectations.Philip Knode was fishing off Naval Station Annapolis when lightning struck about 4: 30 p.m. Aug. 10.Dr. Alice Ackerman, director of pediatric critical care medicine and the pediatric intensive care unit at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the bolt ruptured Philip's eardrum, singed his head and face and damaged muscle tissue, including his heart.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2000
Bob Gillette Skaggs, a career Army officer who witnessed an atomic explosion and survived two lightning strikes, died Sunday of emphysema and pneumonia at a hospital in Delray Beach, Fla. The former Savage resident was 78. Mr. Skaggs was born in Inola, Okla., and began his Army life in an ROTC program at Amarillo High School in Texas. He worked as a radio technician in the early months of World War II, shuttling between various bases in the United States, eventually joining the Army Signal Corps.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | October 9, 1991
EDITOR'S NOTE: Muphen Whitney is off spending some quality time withher horses Super Dude and Shadow's Deadline. She left a column on the capable Chicago Jett, an 18-year-old Appaloosa gelding who is the star teacher at Beth Stambaugh's Lightning Bolt Farm near Westminster.Jett, as the handsome black- and white-spotted horse is known, spends typical Saturdays teaching young and still-young riders the secretsof being good equestrians.His moniker is Chicago Jett -- that's with two T's, please get it right -- and he's the grand old man of Lightning Bolt Farm.
FEATURES
November 9, 1999
BE A 4KIDS DETECTIVEWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/What is the oldest rescue group in the world? (Go to www. pathfinder.com/TFK/ to find out.)What is the science of scrambling messages?What invention is Gertrude Elion famous for?IT'S A SECRET!Whether you want to write secret notes to friends or sign your name in mysterious code, you can code with the best of them at www.thunk.com/ Here you can create secret codes by typing in your text and clicking the scramble button.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
Jared Bradford looks a little different this season. Long Reach's shooting guard hit the weights hard in the offseason and added 15 pounds of upper-body muscle to his frame. Now a solid 5 feet 10 and 175 pounds, he's more capable of banging with the big boys while slashing to the basket - a skill the senior third-year starter regards as his top strength. The muscle is helping, because he's scoring 17.5 points a game for the undefeated and 15th-ranked Lightning. That's higher than last season's 14-point average.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
BERLIN -- In a zinc-clad building shaped like a lightning bolt and aimed at a country's conscience, remnants of 2,000 years of Jewish history in Germany were displayed last night with the opening of the Jewish Museum Berlin. Reminding Germans of what they lost in the city where the Nazis launched their attempt to destroy European Jewry, the museum was inaugurated not as a Holocaust memorial, but as a center of teaching and learning about a people's life, times and culture. Even while the building stood as an empty shell after its completion in 1999, hundreds of thousands of people visited the structure, which has been acclaimed as a masterpiece and was designed by Polish-born American architect Daniel Libeskind.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 20, 2000
A Columbia family has been forced from its home by a fire started by lightning Sunday. Howard County firefighters responded to the call from the 8100 block of Sealight Lane in Long Reach village about 6:20 p.m., where the roof and attic of the two-story house belonging to the Sachs family was on fire. Firefighters battled the blaze for nearly a half-hour before bringing it under control. The fire was extinguished at 7:20 p.m. Three people were home when the lightning struck, but no one was injured, said Capt.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2000
Bob Gillette Skaggs, a career Army officer who witnessed an atomic explosion and survived two lightning strikes, died Sunday of emphysema and pneumonia at a hospital in Delray Beach, Fla. The former Savage resident was 78. Mr. Skaggs was born in Inola, Okla., and began his Army life in an ROTC program at Amarillo High School in Texas. He worked as a radio technician in the early months of World War II, shuttling between various bases in the United States, eventually joining the Army Signal Corps.
FEATURES
November 9, 1999
BE A 4KIDS DETECTIVEWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/What is the oldest rescue group in the world? (Go to www. pathfinder.com/TFK/ to find out.)What is the science of scrambling messages?What invention is Gertrude Elion famous for?IT'S A SECRET!Whether you want to write secret notes to friends or sign your name in mysterious code, you can code with the best of them at www.thunk.com/ Here you can create secret codes by typing in your text and clicking the scramble button.
NEWS
By Paula Lavigne and Paula Lavigne,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
A 10-year-old Annapolis boy injured by lightning last week returned home yesterday to his family -- and pet turtles -- after a doctor in Baltimore said his progress exceeded her expectations.Philip Knode was fishing off Naval Station Annapolis when lightning struck about 4: 30 p.m. Aug. 10.Dr. Alice Ackerman, director of pediatric critical care medicine and the pediatric intensive care unit at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said the bolt ruptured Philip's eardrum, singed his head and face and damaged muscle tissue, including his heart.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 23, 2005
IF THERE was any doubt that Baltimore is the home office for weather wimps, that should be about gone now. Look, we all know people freak out about snow around here. Mention snow is on the way, and you might as well set off the air-raid sirens, too, as people scramble to get to the supermarket and home before the coming nuclear winter hits. But now we freak out about rain, too. In fact, in terms of inducing panic, rain has become the new snow. Now we get the same kind of end-of-the-world TV and radio coverage for rain as we do for snow: the First Warning Weather alerts, potential inch counts, reporters in foul-weather gear doing stand-ups against a backdrop of bumper-to-bumper traffic and beating windshield wipers, shots of BGE trucks on standby in case the power lines start snapping, etc. Case in point: I'm in my car last week, listening to a talk show on the radio, when suddenly they break in with a news bulletin.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 7, 1996
YOU DON'T realize it, but you are constantly enjoying the benefits of science.For example, when you turn on the radio, you take it for granted that music will come out, but do you ever stop to think that this miracle would not be possible without the work of scientists?That's right: There are tiny scientists inside that radio, playing instruments!A similar principle is used in automatic bank-teller machines, which is why they frequently say: "Sorry, out of service." They're too embarrassed to say: "Sorry, tiny scientist going to the bathroom."
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
On the day after her granddaughter was struck to death by lightning, Carol Chisholm sat on the front porch of her pretty brick townhouse and tried to make sense of something that no one could understand. "I always stayed close to my grandchildren because of this crazy world. I tried to shield them from everything. People would say maybe I was overprotective," Chisholm said. The tears welled up but did not spill over. "But some things, oh some things, you just can't do anything about."
NEWS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Sun staff writer Erica C. Harrington contributed to this article | August 20, 1996
The next person who delivers a lifesaving electrical shock to your heart may not be a doctor or even a paramedic.It could be a firefighter with less medical training -- but who knows how to use a sophisticated heart machine designed to "think" like a cardiologist.Yesterday, the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services began using automatic external defibrillators, or AEDs, which analyze the heart and decide whether it needs an electrical shock in order to beat normally.Other area fire departments began using the devices this year, including those in Baltimore City and in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.
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