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TRAVEL
By Diane Stoneback and Diane Stoneback,Morning Call | September 9, 2007
THE LIGHTHOUSES ALONG NEW JERSEY'S shore are so much more than photographs on souvenir postcards, subjects for paintings and models for light-catchers in kitchen windows. Although often overshadowed at vacation time by beaches, sun and seashells, they have stories to tell to all who are willing to listen. Just as surely as waves roll in and rake sand and shells into their swirling grasp for an instant, exploring the state's lighthouses is like breezing into history at full sail. "The lighthouses represent the maritime history of the nation, when wooden ships were sailed by iron men," says Brett Franks, spokesman for the 1,000-member New Jersey Lighthouse Society.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [DANA KINKER] | August 2, 2007
Betterton Day The lowdown -- Spend a day on the beach swimming, tanning and enjoying the sun while browsing local craft vendors at the annual Betterton Day Celebration on Saturday. Also, stay for the afternoon and hear a band perform or play cow-pie bingo. If you go -- Betterton Day is all day Saturday at Betterton Beach, 1 Ericsson Ave., Betterton. Free. Call 410-348-5522 for more information. Keep the light on The lowdown -- Spend a night inside historic Hooper Straight Lighthouse as part of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum's overnighters program.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | July 7, 2007
For generations, the hexagonal Victorian house on legs has stood in the water as an icon of the Chesapeake Bay, its beacon guiding mariners to safe waters. Though the exterior image of the Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse has graced no shortage of tchotchkes, its interior remained fogged in mystery. Until now. Starting today, what experts say is the nation's last intact cottage-style "screw pile" lighthouse still at its original site - it was built over a platform screwed into the sandy bay bottom - is accepting its first visitors.
NEWS
June 17, 2007
Capt. John E. O'Neill of Havre de Grace was captured during the battle of Winchester, Va., which was waged June 16-18, 1863. After enlisting in Company D, Fifth Maryland Infantry, in September 1861, O'Neill suffered five wounds at the battle of Antietam on Sept. 17, 1862. But he recovered in time to fight in Winchester. He was imprisoned, along with two-thirds of his unit, in a tobacco warehouse in Richmond for two months. Discharged from the Army in June 1865, O'Neill worked in Baltimore until 1878, when he became the keeper of Concord Point lighthouse in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
February 14, 2007
On February 12, 2007 WM. T.N. KING survived by his wife Josephine H. (nee Orlick), niece Lorraine A. Socha, great-niece Marlene F. Vlachos, nephew Jesse Abbott, Jr. Memorial services at Lighthouse Senior Living, 1813 Old Eastern Avenue Sunday, February 18 at 2:00 p.m.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
The federal government has extended the bidding deadline for the Bloody Point Bar Lighthouse, a century-old fixer-upper off the Kent Island coast that was expected to be sold this week. The online auction for the lighthouse was to end at 2 p.m. yesterday, but the General Services Administration, which is selling the cast-iron structure, moved the deadline back a day when a bid came in at 1:56 p.m. Within five minutes, two more bids came in, pushing the cost for the lighthouse up to $75,000.
TRAVEL
By John Muncie and Jody Jaffe and John Muncie and Jody Jaffe,Special to the Sun | October 1, 2006
ON THE ROCKY BOTTOM OF DEATH'S Door, a narrow strait in the Wisconsin peninsula that juts into Lake Michigan, lie 128 shipwrecks and one rusting Volkswagen Bug. The shipwrecks are from the age of sail and steam; victims of gales, fog-shrouded nights and hidden shoals. The bug met its end 100 years later in the Age of Aquarius; weather and rocks had nothing to do with it. It seems the car was chronically ill and its hippie owners wanted to give it a grand send-off. So onto the car-ferry it went, and somewhere between Northport and Washington Island, they pushed it overboard.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
If you like lighthouses, then here's a challenge for you: visit Maryland's nine land-based lighthouses in 20 hours this weekend. The Chesapeake chapter of the U.S. Lighthouse Society and Maryland lighthouse organizations are sponsoring the fourth annual Maryland Lighthouse Challenge to promote preservation and visitation to these sentinels by the water. The event is the one time a year that all of the lighthouses are open to the public simultaneously and the only chance for the public to peek inside the Turkey Point lighthouse in the Elk Neck State Park, according to Karen Rosage, the event coordinator.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
Lynn Biancavilla was drawn to the task of scraping paint off the old lighthouse by the simple beauty of the Maryland landmark. "I have passed this many times, and one of my goals was to get out here and step on the lighthouse," says Biancavilla, a resident of Stony Beach, on the Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse porch on a recent Saturday afternoon, surrounded on all sides by blue water. Boat captain Howard Lewis of Eastport says he joined the cause because his grandfather was once a keeper of the light at Thomas Point.
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