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NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | November 11, 1992
Alice Fallon, a resident of the Crofton Convalescent Center, decided it was time for the facility to open its doors and become part of the outside community.So she organized a program through her resident council meeting to buy, prepare and deliver food to the Lighthouse homeless shelter in Annapolis."If we decided to help other people," she said, "we wouldn't always feel sorry for ourselves."Ms. Fallon, 81, said she was encouraged to begin a program to aid the homeless by television and radio reports.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
If all goes according to plan, one Annapolis police lieutenant might spend many of the coldest nights this winter driving a bus that will double as a roving homeless shelter. Lt. Robert E. Beans, a police officer in Annapolis for three decades, says he knows winter is a desperate time for the homeless - particularly in a city with only one shelter, which is so overwhelmed that it turned away 1,100 people last year. Starting next month, Beans plans to pick up homeless people who have been screened for drugs and alcohol by the Lighthouse Shelter and either drive them to a temporary shelter or house them overnight on the bus. "It blows me away, this whole plan," said Capt.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
In speaking to the Carroll County Homebuilder's Association last night, forester Len Wrabel compared the county forestation bill with a lighthouse."Carroll County has guidelines, but they're not quite as inflexible as a lighthouse," said the co-owner of Mar-Len Forestry. He had just told a story of an admiral sailing at night who asked the operator of a point of light in the distance to move, only to find it was a lighthouse.Mr. Wrabel and his wife, Marikay, own Mar-Len Forestry in Westminster.
NEWS
By Jacqueline L. Urgo and Jacqueline L. Urgo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 19, 2001
BARNEGAT LIGHT, N.J. - So much sand is being scoured by tides at the base of what is probably New Jersey's most famous beacon, Barnegat Lighthouse, that the 170-foot-tall structure is being undermined and potentially threatened. Officials contend that "Old Barney" is probably still a long way from being in danger of toppling into the sea, as its predecessor did in 1856. But the Army Corps of Engineers will spend $1.38 million to fill a 50-foot hole near the base of the lighthouse. The cause of the erosion is uncertain, officials said.
NEWS
By Audrey Haar TC and Audrey Haar TC,Staff Writer | May 9, 1993
Although the post-Memorial Day crush has not invaded Ocean City, one can feel the pulsating energy along this narrow strip of land. But just a few miles over the Delaware line, it's a world of history, wildlife and serenity.And it's so close. It can be done in a day trip from Ocean City, or can be split up into several short diversions.The first stop, the Fenwick Lighthouse, is actually located a few feet from the Maryland border.The Assawoman Wildlife Area, about 10 miles inland, is well-known to hunters in the fall, but in the spring and summer, it's a quiet refuge for bird- and nature-watching.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1997
THE MEMORY WALL began as Mary Dansicker's heartfelt comfort to others who have felt the deep loss of a child.The wall is dedicated to Dansicker's son Joshua, a rugged and handsome young man who was photographed near Piney Point Lighthouse less than a year ago.Joshua kept the grounds and gave tours of the lighthouse while studying anthropology and sociology at St. Mary's College. He was killed in an auto accident 11 months ago.Dansicker, 21, a senior at the time of his death, became the first student to be graduated posthumously from St. Mary's.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
On a sultry morning, Dave McNally exits Smith Point Marina and aims his 24-foot Carolina skiff toward 1 o'clock. There, his destination, a faint, gray shadow, protrudes above the Chesapeake Bay horizon. Within minutes, the shadow resolves into the Smith Point lighthouse, a formidable octagonal structure with the haunting allure of a Victorian pile. This is McNally's weekend retreat. For the Minnesota resident who has spent his life exploring the Mississippi by boat, the notion of "going to the Territory" has an entirely different meaning than it did for fellow river rat Huck Finn.
NEWS
By S. Mitra Kalita and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
Homeless men in North County need more than just a place to sleep, say the church volunteers who look after them in the winter.Members of the North Arundel Area Ministries are working to establish a permanent shelter in the Glen Burnie area to provide counseling, education and employment assistance for homeless men. They estimate that the shelter will be complete in two years."
NEWS
June 20, 2004
In Kent County Woman convicted of husband's murder seeking new trial CHESTERTOWN - A woman convicted of killing her husband during a murder-mystery weekend at a resort near St. Michaels is seeking a new trial, saying her lawyers didn't do enough to find out the real reason for her husband's death. In two days of postconviction hearings last week, lawyers William Brennan and Harry Trainor defended their strategy in the trial of Kimberly M. Hricko of Laurel. She is serving a life sentence in the 1998 death of her husband, Stephen Hricko, who prosecutors said died after he was poisoned and his suite at the resort set on fire.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
Clarksville Middle School played host last week to some 40 North Carolina students whose school was badly damaged by Hurricane Emily late last summer.The Cape Hatteras School's entire eighth grade visited as part of the Lighthouse Exchange, a Clarksville-sponsored program that raised more than $5,000 to pay their travel expenses.While Clarksville students got the chance to give their visitors hometown hospitality, they also fulfilled the state's new community service requirement for high school graduation.
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