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Lighthizer

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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 22, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- O. James Lighthizer, former Anne Arundel County executive, was unanimously endorsed for state secretary of transportation yesterday over the objections of some of his former constituents."
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NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | January 21, 2007
The chill of a late summer night had fallen over California's Sierra Nevada range, and all Jim Lighthizer could do was pace. Here at 10,600 feet, the trees had thinned out and a full moon lit the canyon. But the splendor hardly registered. His steps took him back and forth in front of a two-man tent. On the floor lay his 28-year-old son, Conor, a diabetic whose condition worsened by the hour. What was he supposed to do? What the hell was he supposed to do? He could go for help or send his brother-in-law.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
State lawmakers might have thought O. James Lighthizer's confirmation as state secretary of transportation was a foregone conclusion Monday night.But Arnold resident Frederick F. Broglie had plenty of reasons for rejecting Gov. William Donald Schaefer's appointee.Angered by Lighthizer's "irresponsible spending" habits, Broglie appealed to members of the Senate Executive Nominations Committee to reject the former county executive as the new state secretary of transportation.But the effort was to no avail.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | September 10, 2006
Conor J. Lighthizer, a 28-year-old banker and marathon runner from Annapolis, was hiking with his father high in California's Sierra Nevada on Tuesday when he died from a sudden illness. He died of ketoacidosis, a complication of juvenile diabetes, while in the arms of his father, former Anne Arundel County Executive O. James Lighthizer. Extreme altitude might have triggered the condition, James Lighthizer said. "I did everything I could for him. But it was an extremely remote area, and we couldn't get him out," said the elder Mr. Lighthizer, who was Maryland secretary of transportation from 1991 to 1995.
NEWS
July 24, 1992
At worst, Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer's department may have bent the law when it awarded a $35,000 contract to the wife of his friend without competitive bidding. At best, Mr. Lighthizer reinforced his image as a politician with a penchant for cronyism.The former Anne Arundel County executive has been good to his friends since his appointment as MDOT secretary two years ago, hiring seven former county government colleagues.Now, he faces an ethics investigation for granting a no-bid contract to a firm owned by the wife of Francis J. "Zeke" Zylwitis, his former Anne Arundel criminal justice and corrections aide.
NEWS
March 11, 1992
A review of Motor Vehicle Administration procedures found the agency's internal security lax and chastised the MVA for not spelling out security policies to employees, state Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer said yesterday."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | September 10, 2006
Conor J. Lighthizer, a 28-year-old banker and marathon runner from Annapolis, was hiking with his father high in California's Sierra Nevada on Tuesday when he died from a sudden illness. He died of ketoacidosis, a complication of juvenile diabetes, while in the arms of his father, former Anne Arundel County Executive O. James Lighthizer. Extreme altitude might have triggered the condition, James Lighthizer said. "I did everything I could for him. But it was an extremely remote area, and we couldn't get him out," said the elder Mr. Lighthizer, who was Maryland secretary of transportation from 1991 to 1995.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | December 21, 1990
"A seventy-thousand-dollar joke." That was how one Anne Arundel resident described "The Lighthizer Years."No, not the former county executive's two terms in office, which ended this month, but O. James Lighthizer's $73,000 publication of a retrospective of his tenure."This is the very reason we taxpayers went through all the trouble we went through last year," said Robert C. Schaeffer, a leader of a county taxpayer group that fought unsuccessfully earlier this year to place a cap on tax increases.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE and ROBERT LEE,STAFF WRITER | March 5, 1991
An Annapolis resident has filed a $190.000 civil -suit against her landlords. O. James Lighthizer and Torrey Brown, claiming they misrepresented waterfront property and failed to properly maintain it.Dale Snyder, an independent consultant, has lived in the state secretaries' waterfront property since October 1989. She pays $1,456 a month in rent.She claims their "negligence" and "breach of contract" has caused serious injury to her and "a serious exacerbation" of her daughter's cystic fibrosis.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | May 21, 1991
In his search for a new port director, Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer says he is also looking for a deputy director."I'm not looking for one guy. I'm looking for two," he said during an interview at week's end in his office at the World Trade Center at the Inner Harbor.Mr. Lighthizer, who has said that he considers management ability rather than experience in the maritime industry as the principal requirement, now is hinting that he may look for a deputy director with the maritime experience that the new port director might lack.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
A Crofton businessman and aide to former Anne Arundel County Executive O. James Lighthizer has been appointed to run the Annapolis city government. Robert Agee, 53, started work yesterday as acting city administrator, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer announced. If confirmed by the city council, Agee, who will earn $93,000 a year, will be the first permanent city administrator of Moyer's term. Moyer, who said she worked with Agee in his county role during the 1980s, said he complements a new city team with a range of talents.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
A veteran of political fights in stints as Anne Arundel county executive and Maryland transportation secretary, O. James Lighthizer is turning his attention to other battlefields -- from the Civil War, as president of a newly formed preservation group. He is leaving his job of the past three years as a partner with the Baltimore law firm Miles and Stockbridge to head the Civil War Preservation Trust, based in Arlington, Va. "I've reached a point in life where I really want to do something that I'm interested in and I'm committed to," Lighthizer said yesterday.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
O. James Lighthizer, a former Anne Arundel County executive and state transportation secretary, was arrested on drunken-driving charges early yesterday after Annapolis police saw him staggering on a sidewalk, then driving erratically on Rowe Boulevard, police said.Lighthizer, 51, of the 1500 block of Eton Way in Crofton recorded a 0.31 percent blood-alcohol content on a Breathalyzer test, three times the level considered legally drunk in Maryland, according to a police report.He was charged with driving while intoxicated, driving under the influence of alcohol, failure to drive to the right of the center line and negligent driving.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Tom Pelton and Lyle Denniston and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court turned down yesterday an effort by Anne Arundel County to save millions of dollars by rolling back controversial pension increases granted to some top county officials in 1989.The high court refused to hear the county's appeal of a 1996 U.S. District Court decision that struck down a pension-cutting law.Democratic County Executive O. James Lighthizer pushed for the increases in benefits near the end of his eight years in office in the 1980s, arguing that he needed to dissuade key employees from leaving before he finished his legislative agenda.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Tom Pelton and Lyle Denniston and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court turned down yesterday an effort by Anne Arundel County to save millions of dollars by rolling back controversial pension increases granted to some top county officials in 1989.The high court refused to hear the county's appeal of a 1996 U.S. District Court decision that struck down a pension-cutting law.Democratic County Executive O. James Lighthizer pushed for the increases in benefits near the end of his eight years in office in the 1980s, arguing that he needed to dissuade key employees from leaving before he finished his legislative agenda.
NEWS
October 16, 1996
Thanks to Rebecca Orenstein, the Maryland Department of Transportation changed the way it does business and the historic town of Westminster received needed road improvements with its historic character intact.When a road project threatened historic, tree-lined Main Street in 1989, Orenstein, a local photographer, decided something should be done. When she was told nothing could be done because the city would lose millions in state money for repairs, she founded Tree-Action.Orenstein, who later was elected to the Westminster City Council, and her allies persuaded teachers to tell their students about the history of Main Street.
NEWS
By Doug Birchand David Simon Peter Jensen of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | December 2, 1990
Outgoing Anne Arundel County Executive O. James Lighthizer was named state transportation secretary by Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday and will replace Richard H. Trainor, who is retiring, on Jan. 1.The appointment was not unexpected, as Mr. Lighthizer had twice talked to Mr. Schaefer about the position and had attended a transportation department briefing, according to a top aide.A lawyer by trade, Mr. Lighthizer joins the governor's Cabinet after two four-year terms as Anne Arundel executive.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | November 20, 1990
A top official in Anne Arundel's transition government said the outgoing administration of O. James Lighthizer earns a "B" for its management of county finances.But he warns that a worsening economy means that the incoming county executive, Robert R. Neall, will have to hit the budget books much harder to keep that grade."I'd probably give them a good, solid 'B,' " Robert J. Dvorak, Neall's chief of staff, said Friday. "They're leaving the county in a good financial condition. The only reason that I don't give them a higher grade is that they were very fortunate in having eight years of good economic times."
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
In May 1989, a year and a half before leaving office, the Lighthizer administration won unanimous County Council support for a bill that increased retirement benefits for top Anne Arundel officials by 25 percent.Since then, the bill has become a punching bag for former County Executive Robert R. Neall and current County Executive John G. Gary, both Republicans, and a symbol of Democratic extravagance."It's taken on a life of its own as a political issue," said former County Executive O. James Lighthizer in the first interview in which he has agreed to talk about the bill since it passed.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
Neal M. Janey's resignation as Baltimore city solicitor becomes effective next month, but chances are he won't be moving far from the city Board of Estimates.As the city's chief lawyer, Janey has sat for more than eight years on the powerful board, which awards millions of dollars in city contracts each year. When he begins his new job at the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, he could be appearing before the same panel, trying to win some of those coveted contracts for paying clients.
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