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Light Years

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NEWS
September 23, 2011
Baltimore City is fortunate to have Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke representing parts of North and Northeast Baltimore. She possesses the vision, sensitivity, insight and follow-through to recognize the need for clarifying the law requiring citizens to be notified when city trees are to be cut down. Also, kudos to David C. Troy for filing legal documents requesting a temporary restraining order against cutting trees in preparation for the grand prix race in Baltimore. His actions prevented more trees from being removed.
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SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Outfielder Nolan Reimold feels “light-years” better than he did at this time last year, according to Buck Showalter. The manager said he could join the Orioles this season if he continues to progress well in his return from multiple neck fusion surgeries. In his second rehab game for Bowie on Wednesday, Reimold served as the designated hitter. He was hitless in his first three at-bats. On Tuesday, he was 1-for-3 and played six innings in left field. “This is the best he's felt since the initial injury,” Showalter said.
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NEWS
May 10, 2011
Anyone who follows the Baltimore Orioles can see they are playing about the way they have for over a decade. They seemingly still can't beat the top-tier teams in their division, their starting pitching has been faltering and so far their bullpen has had some forgettable moments. Same old story, different year. Talented ball players with stellar major-league resumes were purchased in the off-season to turn the team's fortunes around, but unfortunately those players have not been performing up to expectations.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees won't know for sure until his players strap on the pads and can start making tackles, but if the way his young defense is getting to the ball in organized team activities is any indication, the Ravens might be nearing a return to their fast, ball-swarming defense of old. "I think [the team speed] has improved a lot," Pees said. "It looks like it out here in OTAs, but again, we've got to see it when all the pads are on. … But I really do believe that we've gotten faster.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees won't know for sure until his players strap on the pads and can start making tackles, but if the way his young defense is getting to the ball in organized team activities is any indication, the Ravens might be nearing a return to their fast, ball-swarming defense of old. "I think [the team speed] has improved a lot," Pees said. "It looks like it out here in OTAs, but again, we've got to see it when all the pads are on. … But I really do believe that we've gotten faster.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Alex Len was 13 years old, a gangly teenager whose body had been shooting up a startling pace from a young age. As he practiced gymnastics at a local school in the small, rural coal-mining town in Ukraine where he lived, Len was motioned over by a basketball coach walking by the room. "He told me, 'You don't belong there,'" Len recalled with a smile one afternoon last week. The coach invited him to practice with the basketball team. Having been told he was too tall for gymnastics and soccer, Len soon embarked on a journey that could reach a remarkable crossroad Thursday night, some seven years later and thousands of miles from where he lived with his mother, older sister, grandparents and an aunt.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 17, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- The Bush White House seems driven by a secret doctrine that has gotten little public attention: the Doctrine of Two Years Too Late. Over and over, in recent months, the Bush team has adopted policies it rejected two, three or four years ago, when those policies might have made a difference. You might say that two years too late is better than never. But it's tragic to see the administration adopt sensible policies now that might have saved the day in Iraq and elsewhere had they been ushered in earlier.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Outfielder Nolan Reimold feels “light-years” better than he did at this time last year, according to Buck Showalter. The manager said he could join the Orioles this season if he continues to progress well in his return from multiple neck fusion surgeries. In his second rehab game for Bowie on Wednesday, Reimold served as the designated hitter. He was hitless in his first three at-bats. On Tuesday, he was 1-for-3 and played six innings in left field. “This is the best he's felt since the initial injury,” Showalter said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 23, 1995
"White Dwarf" takes the premise of "Northern Exposure," sets it on a distant planet, then dresses it all up in the language of myth and fairy tale.Cool, hey?Cool, no. Try lame, tedious, tired, obvious. Is there anybody in programming at Fox who knows anything about made-for-TV movies?"White Dwarf," which airs at 8 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), is supposed to be the network's big movie event of May sweeps. It's also supposed to be indicative of the "quality television" that John Matoian, the new president of Fox Entertainment, promises to deliver.
FEATURES
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 18, 1992
"Make it so." With those stirring words, Capt. Jean-Luc Picard launches the starship USS Enterprise to yet another distant corner of the galaxy in search of knowledge and ever-higher ratings for "Star Trek: The Next Generation."To boldly go where no one has gone before, every week, requires an awe-inspiring range of technology, from warp engines that push the Enterprise many times faster than the speed of light to food replicators that materialize cups of piping hot tea for the homesick Starfleet crew.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Alex Len was 13 years old, a gangly teenager whose body had been shooting up a startling pace from a young age. As he practiced gymnastics at a local school in the small, rural coal-mining town in Ukraine where he lived, Len was motioned over by a basketball coach walking by the room. "He told me, 'You don't belong there,'" Len recalled with a smile one afternoon last week. The coach invited him to practice with the basketball team. Having been told he was too tall for gymnastics and soccer, Len soon embarked on a journey that could reach a remarkable crossroad Thursday night, some seven years later and thousands of miles from where he lived with his mother, older sister, grandparents and an aunt.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Baltimore City is fortunate to have Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke representing parts of North and Northeast Baltimore. She possesses the vision, sensitivity, insight and follow-through to recognize the need for clarifying the law requiring citizens to be notified when city trees are to be cut down. Also, kudos to David C. Troy for filing legal documents requesting a temporary restraining order against cutting trees in preparation for the grand prix race in Baltimore. His actions prevented more trees from being removed.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
Anyone who follows the Baltimore Orioles can see they are playing about the way they have for over a decade. They seemingly still can't beat the top-tier teams in their division, their starting pitching has been faltering and so far their bullpen has had some forgettable moments. Same old story, different year. Talented ball players with stellar major-league resumes were purchased in the off-season to turn the team's fortunes around, but unfortunately those players have not been performing up to expectations.
NEWS
By Tiffany Arnold, The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown | December 5, 2010
Anyone who has ever wondered what kind of people leave their Christmas lights up all year, meet the Morgans, the kind of neighbors you'll either love or hate. About seven years ago, Mary and Richard Morgan decided they weren't going to take down their Christmas lights. Ever. Traditionalists — those appalled at the thought of putting up Christmas lights any sooner than Thanksgiving and leaving them up beyond New Year's — would probably consider what the Morgans have done as something akin to sacrilege.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 17, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- The Bush White House seems driven by a secret doctrine that has gotten little public attention: the Doctrine of Two Years Too Late. Over and over, in recent months, the Bush team has adopted policies it rejected two, three or four years ago, when those policies might have made a difference. You might say that two years too late is better than never. But it's tragic to see the administration adopt sensible policies now that might have saved the day in Iraq and elsewhere had they been ushered in earlier.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | September 15, 2006
The growing array of planets that scientists have spotted orbiting stars far from our sun got a little bigger yesterday, and a lot more bizarre. Astronomers announced in Washington that they have discovered a new planet 450 light-years from Earth that's the biggest ever found. It's 38 percent bigger than Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system - but with half the mass, making it less dense than cork. The discovery is so weird and unexpected that scientists think the discovery may represent an entirely new class of planets.
NEWS
By Tiffany Arnold, The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown | December 5, 2010
Anyone who has ever wondered what kind of people leave their Christmas lights up all year, meet the Morgans, the kind of neighbors you'll either love or hate. About seven years ago, Mary and Richard Morgan decided they weren't going to take down their Christmas lights. Ever. Traditionalists — those appalled at the thought of putting up Christmas lights any sooner than Thanksgiving and leaving them up beyond New Year's — would probably consider what the Morgans have done as something akin to sacrilege.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope say they accidentally found what may be the oldest, faintest and most distant cluster of galaxies ever glimpsed -- a lumpy arc of perhaps a half-dozen small star groups up to 10 billion light years away.Because light began traveling from the cluster 10 billion years ago, astronomers say the Hubble photograph may have lifted the veil on a corner of the universe when it was just one-third its present age, an estimated 15 billion years.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
Astronomers around the world are pointing their telescopes toward the expected appearance of a new supernova - the explosion of a massive and very distant star. The excitement follows the detection Feb.17 of an unprecedented blast of high-energy radiation, called a gamma ray burst, from a galaxy 440 million light-years from Earth. Gamma ray bursts, or GRBs, are observed about once a day. But astronomers trace almost all of them to the extreme depths of the universe, billions of light years away.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
Dr. Karen E. Lasser has never prescribed Vioxx or Celebrex or any of the new arthritis drugs because, well, they're too new. The internist at Cambridge Hospital and Harvard Medical School has found that, even after the Food and Drug Administration has deemed a medication safe and effective, serious side effects crop up over time. "Basically the chance of a new drug having a serious problem is one in five," said Lasser. "In general, I really try to avoid the new drugs for this reason." Merck & Co.'s Vioxx is only the latest product to be pulled from pharmacy shelves.
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