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By Darryl Campagna and Darryl Campagna,ALBANY TIMES UNION | December 23, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. -- In "Troilus and Cressida," Shakespeare wrote: "Alas the day, how loath you are to offend daylight!"Shakespeare wasn't writing about seasonal affective disorder when he penned that line for his character Pandarus, but his words have a contemporary resonance for the millions of people who struggle through the winter doldrums.Sometimes scoffingly dismissed by the uninformed as a made-up disease, a real case of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is no laughing matter, said Dr. Robin Tassinari, a professor of and clinical medicine at Albany Medical College.
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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 22, 2007
About this time each year, Lisa Morris starts yearning for more light in her life. The 31-year-old mother of two from Middle River suffers from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a condition that prompts her to turn on a specially designed fluorescent lamp for up to an hour every morning when she rises. Purchased from a medical supply outlet, the light helps ward off the ailment's most common symptoms: persistent fatigue, oversleeping and an increased appetite for sugary and starchy foods that often leads to weight gain.
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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
The crew of the Shuttle Endeavour may be floating 360 miles above Earth, but their biological clocks are ticking on Tokyo time: When America sleeps, they're awake.But in space, nothing is as simple as that. Orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes, the astronauts experience 16 sunrises and 16 sunsets in a 24-hour period."Hey, good morning, Houston. It can't be morning -- it's still dark outside," shuttle pilot Ken Bowersox told mission control after receiving the crew's first musical wake-up call Thursday at 7:57 p.m., a cornball reveille called "Cosmos."
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By Denise Grady and Denise Grady,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1999
STRASBURG, Pa. -- This was not the typical audience for a medical conference, but then again, this was no typical conference. At an inn set in the lush farmland of Lancaster County, doctors attending scientific lectures were joined by young Mennonite and Amish couples, the women in bonnets and the men in suspenders, babies fussing in their laps.The Amish and Mennonites may travel by horse and buggy and forgo most modern conveniences, but there is one bit of progress that they are eager to embrace: gene therapy.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 22, 2007
About this time each year, Lisa Morris starts yearning for more light in her life. The 31-year-old mother of two from Middle River suffers from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a condition that prompts her to turn on a specially designed fluorescent lamp for up to an hour every morning when she rises. Purchased from a medical supply outlet, the light helps ward off the ailment's most common symptoms: persistent fatigue, oversleeping and an increased appetite for sugary and starchy foods that often leads to weight gain.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
A visor to wipe away the winter blahs, a lightweight air tank for firefighters and a newfangled machine to rotate hay were some of the Maryland-built products honored with state financial awards in Annapolis yesterday.The Department of Economic and Employment Development handed out 10 Challenge Investment awards of $50,000 each to companies with innovative products and good business plans.In making awards, "we're looking for potential future growth and job creation," said Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of DEED.
NEWS
By Denise Grady and Denise Grady,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1999
STRASBURG, Pa. -- This was not the typical audience for a medical conference, but then again, this was no typical conference. At an inn set in the lush farmland of Lancaster County, doctors attending scientific lectures were joined by young Mennonite and Amish couples, the women in bonnets and the men in suspenders, babies fussing in their laps.The Amish and Mennonites may travel by horse and buggy and forgo most modern conveniences, but there is one bit of progress that they are eager to embrace: gene therapy.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | March 4, 2005
Do cold medications cause prostate problems? No. But pseudoephedrine, which is ubiquitous in decongestant cold remedies, may bring undetected prostate problems to light. Usually, these problems -- chiefly trouble with urination due to an enlarged prostate -- go away when the medication is stopped. Virtually all men develop an enlarged prostate as they age, which makes them urinate more frequently, but is not an indication of cancer. Pseudoephedrine acts on molecules in muscles and blood vessels: In the nose, it constricts tiny blood vessels and dries up nasal secretions.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 2007
Daylight-saving time begins three weeks earlier this year and lasts one week later - welcome news for people who relish the extra afternoon light to garden, ride a bicycle, walk the dog or just take out the trash when they can still see the curb. But the extension, which begins Sunday, could actually make millions of Americans feel less sunny. For those people - suffering from seasonal affective disorder or its milder cousin, winter blues - the corresponding reduction in morning light may worsen or lengthen their depression, doctors and mood experts say. "We're very worried about it," says Michael Terman, director of New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms.
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By Lindsey McPherson | January 25, 2012
It doesn't look like much -- Janet Althen places what looks like a small flashlight with an inverted colored bulb on certain points of the body, holding it there for about 30 seconds -- but for Althen's patients, as well as a growing number of people around the world who are receiving the alternative treatment, light therapy has healing power. “There's like an awakening when Janet uses the light,” said Dana Echols, 44, who has been a patient of Althen's for four years and been receiving light work, a new form of alternative medical treatment, for nearly two years.
FEATURES
By Darryl Campagna and Darryl Campagna,ALBANY TIMES UNION | December 23, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. -- In "Troilus and Cressida," Shakespeare wrote: "Alas the day, how loath you are to offend daylight!"Shakespeare wasn't writing about seasonal affective disorder when he penned that line for his character Pandarus, but his words have a contemporary resonance for the millions of people who struggle through the winter doldrums.Sometimes scoffingly dismissed by the uninformed as a made-up disease, a real case of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is no laughing matter, said Dr. Robin Tassinari, a professor of and clinical medicine at Albany Medical College.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
A visor to wipe away the winter blahs, a lightweight air tank for firefighters and a newfangled machine to rotate hay were some of the Maryland-built products honored with state financial awards in Annapolis yesterday.The Department of Economic and Employment Development handed out 10 Challenge Investment awards of $50,000 each to companies with innovative products and good business plans.In making awards, "we're looking for potential future growth and job creation," said Mark L. Wasserman, secretary of DEED.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
The crew of the Shuttle Endeavour may be floating 360 miles above Earth, but their biological clocks are ticking on Tokyo time: When America sleeps, they're awake.But in space, nothing is as simple as that. Orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes, the astronauts experience 16 sunrises and 16 sunsets in a 24-hour period."Hey, good morning, Houston. It can't be morning -- it's still dark outside," shuttle pilot Ken Bowersox told mission control after receiving the crew's first musical wake-up call Thursday at 7:57 p.m., a cornball reveille called "Cosmos."
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
Sure, we had a great January, and spring is just around the corner. But this is February, the shortest -- and in its own way, the longest -- month of the year. It's cold and dark, and you need a cure for the winter doldrums. Here are 10 suggestions that might help: 1. Do something for yourself. Stop dieting until spring (but eat healthful foods as often as you can). Buy yourself a pair of ridiculous shoes. Have a glass of champagne. Get tickets to a concert. Work your way through the American Film Institute's list of 100 best films (afi.
NEWS
By Susan FitzGerald and Susan FitzGerald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 30, 2003
MIFFLINBURG, Pa. -- Bedtime comes early at the Martin farm, where life is still ordered by the rhythms of nature and the Old Order Mennonite faith. By dinnertime, with the cows milked and the animals fed, Amy, 10, and Derick, 12, are struggling to stay awake. By 8 p.m., they are off to bed, soon fast asleep beneath rows of special 4-foot fluorescent lights that bathe them all night in a purplish-blue glow. The lights keep them alive. Amy and Derick have a rare liver disease that causes a dangerous accumulation of a substance called bilirubin.
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