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Light Pollution

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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 8, 2010
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge Thursday refused to order the lights dimmed at a Bowleys Quarters Royal Farms store, despite arguments that they were interfering with operation of the nearby Bengies Drive-In Theatre. Bengies owner D. Edward Vogel contends that light from the store bleeds over onto his property and is distracting to some customers watching movies from their cars. Although a zoning hearing officer had found in 2003 that an adequate buffer needed to be installed between the store and drive-in to keep such light encroachment to a minimum, Judge Kathleen Cox ruled that enforcement of that ruling was up to the county's Department of Permits & Development Management, which has said the Royal Farms store's lights are not in violation of the county zoning code.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014
I am a resident of Rodgers Forge with my property backing up to Towson University's practice fields. I have lived here for about a year working very hard so that I can afford my dream home. But I have become concerned with Towson University's plan to build a softball stadium extremely close to me and other people living in this neighborhood. I am concerned about noise and light pollution and the effect this will have on my property value. There are other locations on Towson University's property that are suitable for this stadium and not impinging on residential properties.  Another issue of concern is Towson University's disregard for the "Memorandum of Understanding" that it has with Rodgers Forge. If Towson University will not stand by this Memorandum of Understanding, how can they be trusted?
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
It's just a small patch of grass between the Toys `R' Us parking lot and Putty Hill Avenue, but it glows in the night like the outfield at Camden Yards. "You think that's bright enough?" asks Gretchen Sarkin, pointing above the green strip toward a pole with about 4,000 watts worth of light bulbs. "You see spots. You can read your watch it's so bright." The lights in the Towson Place parking lot - described as the aurora borealis of Baltimore County by one government official - have brought complaints from Sarkin and her Loch Raven Village neighbors since the shopping center was renovated a couple of years ago. The debate has helped to sweep the county into a growing nationwide movement against "light pollution."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak over the next couple of nights, bringing the best chance of the year to see "shooting stars". The best night is expected to be Friday night into early Saturday morning, with the most meteors being visible after midnight. But the Geminids are one meteor shower that can also be seen before midnight because Gemini, the constellation that they appear to emanate from, is in the night sky relatively early, according to the American Meteor Society.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
The Maryland Science Center is looking for at least 1,500 sets of eyeballs -- people willing to step outside and count stars in the constellation Orion. Organizers of the experiment hope to gather enough star counts from around the state to assemble a "light-pollution map," revealing where Marylanders can still see the night sky, and where it's disappearing in the glare of poorly designed urban lighting. It's not a stunt on behalf of a tiny band of backyard astronomers. Organizers say the project -- called "Enlighten Maryland" -- is designed to involve students in real science, and to awaken the public to an issue that affects their safety and their pocketbooks.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
Eldersburg residents concerned about noise and light pollution from a proposed drive-in theater plan to express their concerns tomorrow at a public hearing before the Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals. Residents have invited a noise-control specialist from the Maryland Department of the Environment to bolster their arguments when the zoning appeals board resumes a hearing that began last month. "We will be on hand to answer questions of a technical nature and offer opinions as to noise levels," said George Harman, an MDE noise program specialist.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 12, 1993
What if they had a meteor shower and no one could see it through the light pollution?Some lessons should be learned from the Vincent Foster tragedy. None will be.Any league that calls a Baltimore club the Rhinos will pick the wrong cities for expansion.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
TO THE UNTUTORED EYE, the newly discovered Comet Hyakutake is the star that looks drunk on a cloudless night. It is a smudge when real stars are sharp. It changes its place from night to night and from hour to hour. It wasn't there, and then it was, and soon it will be gone.No Hubble or other fabled telescope or university consortium discovered this brightest of comets. Yuji Hyakutake, a dedicated amateur with equipment more powerful than most individuals have, did. Then, as word spread and the world peered, he had trouble seeing it again because his viewing mountain in Japan remained cloud-shrouded.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
The Maryland Port Administration is going ahead with installation of a dramatic new lighting system for the top of the World Trade Center downtown, despite complaints that it will increase "light pollution" and may threaten migrating birds.The plans call for 10 narrow beams of bluish-white xenon light to be aimed at the horizon from atop the 28-story office tower. The building is owned by the Port Administration.Construction of the $341,000 lighting system has already begun and a full-scale test is likely sometime next week.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
The state's plan to shine 10 powerful spotlight beams from the crown of the 28-story World Trade Center is drawing fire from astronomers, bird lovers and others who would rather see the sky get dark at night.Michael A. Hall, president of the Baltimore Astronomical Society, told the Maryland Port Commission yesterday that "light pollution" from the $341,000 project will swamp the sky for amateur astronomers like him and "steal stars from every man, woman and child" within the likely 10-mile range of the beams.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
I have never had a conversation with either of the candidates for the Columbia Council from Oakland Mills Village. As such I'd have to base my choice on their statements published in this paper a week or two ago. Ms. McGready stated she was a supporter of a better Columbia and would work to make Columbia the better choice for families. I can appreciate that as I have seen many changes over the 30 plus years that I have lived here. Some good changes, some not so good. In that statement, she never once mentioned Oakland Mills Village.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | October 4, 2012
The following letter was sent to Planning and Zoning and the Advisory and Development Committee in Harford County government. A copy was provided for publication.    Sir, I would like to express my concerns, which are many, but I will state mostly the ones which have a major negative impact on my community as a homeowner in Bright Oaks. I am mostly concerned about traffic and safety along with other items. Common sense alone as far as traffic, should be enough to stop Walmart to build here.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Going block by block, crews in bucket trucks are converting 70,000 city streetlights from sodium vapor lights to long-lasting, energy-saving LEDs. The bright side: Baltimore expects to reap an annual savings of $1.9 million on its electric bill and $275,000 in maintenance costs. Also, advocates say the lights produce less glare and are more focused, meaning less light pollution that drowns out the night stars and can disrupt ecosystems. The dimmer side: Critics say the new lights don't illuminate the area as well.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Sunday, April 1 'Music at Marriottsville' A concert with the Christian Choir of Howard County takes place at 3 p.m. at Bon Secours Spiritual Center, 1525 Marriottsville Road, Marriottsville. A free-will offering will be collected. Information: 410-442-1320 or bonsecoursspiritualcenter.org. Wednesday, April 4 Singing stars The sixth annual Maryland Senior Idol competition takes place at 1 p.m. at the Bowie Center for the Performing Arts, 15200 Annapolis Road.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
The small communities off of the Providence Road corridor from the Baltimore Beltway to Loch Raven Drive in Baltimore County will be changed forever with the upcoming plan to have a mega-church purchase a "mini" church presently existing inside of our quiet neighborhoods. These communities of Chatterleigh, Hampton Gardens, Glen Ellen, Roxleigh and Pineleigh are quiet, fairly rural and have streets with no sidewalks, countless trees and only a two-lane road leading to and from the peace and quiet.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 8, 2010
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge Thursday refused to order the lights dimmed at a Bowleys Quarters Royal Farms store, despite arguments that they were interfering with operation of the nearby Bengies Drive-In Theatre. Bengies owner D. Edward Vogel contends that light from the store bleeds over onto his property and is distracting to some customers watching movies from their cars. Although a zoning hearing officer had found in 2003 that an adequate buffer needed to be installed between the store and drive-in to keep such light encroachment to a minimum, Judge Kathleen Cox ruled that enforcement of that ruling was up to the county's Department of Permits & Development Management, which has said the Royal Farms store's lights are not in violation of the county zoning code.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
I am a resident of Rodgers Forge with my property backing up to Towson University's practice fields. I have lived here for about a year working very hard so that I can afford my dream home. But I have become concerned with Towson University's plan to build a softball stadium extremely close to me and other people living in this neighborhood. I am concerned about noise and light pollution and the effect this will have on my property value. There are other locations on Towson University's property that are suitable for this stadium and not impinging on residential properties.  Another issue of concern is Towson University's disregard for the "Memorandum of Understanding" that it has with Rodgers Forge. If Towson University will not stand by this Memorandum of Understanding, how can they be trusted?
NEWS
May 15, 2011
The small communities off of the Providence Road corridor from the Baltimore Beltway to Loch Raven Drive in Baltimore County will be changed forever with the upcoming plan to have a mega-church purchase a "mini" church presently existing inside of our quiet neighborhoods. These communities of Chatterleigh, Hampton Gardens, Glen Ellen, Roxleigh and Pineleigh are quiet, fairly rural and have streets with no sidewalks, countless trees and only a two-lane road leading to and from the peace and quiet.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
The Maryland Science Center is looking for at least 1,500 sets of eyeballs -- people willing to step outside and count stars in the constellation Orion. Organizers of the experiment hope to gather enough star counts from around the state to assemble a "light-pollution map," revealing where Marylanders can still see the night sky, and where it's disappearing in the glare of poorly designed urban lighting. It's not a stunt on behalf of a tiny band of backyard astronomers. Organizers say the project -- called "Enlighten Maryland" -- is designed to involve students in real science, and to awaken the public to an issue that affects their safety and their pocketbooks.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
Howard County's fire and police chiefs and public works director made their case for construction of the county's first Public Safety Training Facility with prospective neighbors, firefighters and police officers at a community meeting last night. And people with homes near the Alpha Ridge Landfill near Marriottsville - proposed home of the facility - shared worries about the possible noise and light pollution and traffic snarls. The project could cost as much as $10 million and take about five years to complete, said county Public Works Director James M. Irvin.
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