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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
As with many things in life, the secret to clarifying butter is patience. "You can't hurry love," chef Linda Vogler instructs her culinary students, gathered around as she helps a student skim the foamy, fatty spots from a saucepan of melted butter. Then she breaks into song: "You can't hurry love. No, you just have to wait ... " and the students burst into giggles, a few singing along. Vogler is the beloved culinary instructor at Light House, an Annapolis-based shelter and homeless prevention organization.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
As with many things in life, the secret to clarifying butter is patience. "You can't hurry love," chef Linda Vogler instructs her culinary students, gathered around as she helps a student skim the foamy, fatty spots from a saucepan of melted butter. Then she breaks into song: "You can't hurry love. No, you just have to wait ... " and the students burst into giggles, a few singing along. Vogler is the beloved culinary instructor at Light House, an Annapolis-based shelter and homeless prevention organization.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | August 16, 1991
The first homeless families already were camped out in the hall yesterday, a day before Light House, Annapolis' long-awaited 30-day emergency shelter, was to open.With homeless shelters filled throughout the Baltimore-Washington region, some people were ready to stand inline to get one of the 12 beds.A crew of volunteers finished converting an old convenience storeon West Street into the emergency shelter earlier this week, said Timothy McGuire, the Light House caseworker.Today, after more than a month's delay, Light House officially will open its doors.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
The 2014 General Assembly session got underway Wednesday, turning Annapolis into the state's center of debate, protest, legislation and proclamation for the next 90 days. Legislators from Anne Arundel County are promoting bills that range from rolling back stormwater fees to legalizing refillable containers of wine. Local lawmakers also will take another crack at changing the makeup of the Anne Arundel school board - a seemingly perennial issue for the county delegation. On that front, the bill being considered is identical to one proposed last year to create a school board with seven elected members, three members appointed by the governor and one student member, said Del. Steve Schuh, a Gibson Island Republican who is chairman of the county's House delegation.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | March 11, 1991
Faced with a three-month deadline, construction crews and volunteersare scurrying to convert an old Annapolis convenience store into an emergency shelter so the homeless don't end up back on the streets.Annapolis Area Ministries, a coalition of seven churches building apermanent home for the Light House shelter, only has until the end of May to complete construction. In June, St. Mary's Catholic Church wants to renovate its Charles Carroll House, a historic brick parish house now used for the homeless shelter.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2005
When her roommate moved out of the Upper Marlboro apartment they shared last summer, Cynthia Williams was sure she couldn't support her child and make ends meet by herself. But the Louisiana native never imagined she would fall behind so quickly on her bills - and wind up in the cold just a few months later. Homeless for the first time, Williams turned to Annapolis' Light House, the only year-round emergency shelter for single adults and families in Anne Arundel County. The nonprofit facility does something that many other county shelters don't: It houses people, like Williams, from outside the county who need assistance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Mildred E. "Millie" Banwell, an artist who was a longtime supporter of the Light House shelter and an active member of Calvary United Methodist Church, died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at Hospice of the Chesapeake in Pasadena. The longtime Annapolis resident was 75. "I have a very high regard for her and we will miss her terribly. She was a great Christian lady and a leader at Calvary," said the Rev. Byron P. Brought, who pastored Calvary in Annapolis from 1992 until 2010, when he retired.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Four-year-old Jacob Sutherland walked up to the front table at the Friends of the Light House Shelter pumpkin patch. He held a handmade skeleton-bead necklace, a bag of sugar cookies and a miniature pumpkin, and paid for them with $3 from his Spider-Man wallet. "I got five pumpkins already," he said. "One's small and all of the other ones were big." Alex Sutherland of Eastport said his son had already been to the pumpkin patch in front of St. Martin's Evangelical Lutheran Church twice in its first two days of operation, loading up on pumpkins for his family.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | January 30, 2008
Backers of Annapolis' only homeless shelter are seeking more money from the city and Anne Arundel County to keep pace with escalating construction costs for a new, larger facility planned near Parole. Officials from the Light House asked the City Council Monday night to double its funding in each of the next two fiscal years to $400,000. That would bring the city's total funding for the project to $1 million. The 22,000-square-foot building was expected to cost $6.8 million a year ago, but this week, shelter officials estimated the price tag has risen to $8.5 million.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The thin man in the black tuxedo really was Joseph Bishop, sitting there before his consomme of duck with confit ravioli and surrounded by enough fancy silverware to sink a skiff -- the same Joseph Bishop who, three weeks ago, counted himself among the homeless.Tuesday, he counted himself among 200 guests at the Loews Annapolis Hotel for a nine-course banquet to benefit the Light House shelter in Annapolis. This summer, the 45-year-old man called the shelter home.Mr. Bishop showed up at the West Street shelter June 5 without a job, money or a place to stay.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Mildred E. "Millie" Banwell, an artist who was a longtime supporter of the Light House shelter and an active member of Calvary United Methodist Church, died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at Hospice of the Chesapeake in Pasadena. The longtime Annapolis resident was 75. "I have a very high regard for her and we will miss her terribly. She was a great Christian lady and a leader at Calvary," said the Rev. Byron P. Brought, who pastored Calvary in Annapolis from 1992 until 2010, when he retired.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
The barber spent at least 20 minutes grooming his client's hair and beard. With his clippers, brush, razor and shaving cream, he skillfully tended to every detail, frequently asking the man in the chair his preferences. When the appointment was done, the men exchanged thanks and a handshake. Robert W. Cradle, the 43-year-old founder of the nonprofit Rob's Barbershop Community Foundation, does not charge for his services to the homeless and needy. His satisfaction stems from "how happy people are when they like the way they look," he said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Disagreements with his family forced Martise Stewart from his home. And without anywhere to go, he ended up sleeping in a wooded area in Odenton. With colder weather approaching, Stewart, who is unemployed, made his way to the Light House Shelter in Annapolis. "They're helping me get my resume together," said Stewart, 29. "I've only been there two weeks so I'm getting myself together rapidly. " Beginning today, Light House residents, including Stewart, will start moving into a new, $8.3 million building — called the Light House Homeless Prevention and Support Center — which will greatly expand the number of clients and the services offered to serve the county's growing homeless population.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | February 7, 2010
The Light House homeless shelter in Annapolis has received a grant of more than a half-million dollars, its largest gift for the construction of a larger and more comprehensive center planned to open in the fall. The Kresge Foundation has provided a $575,000 grant to the shelter, with $425,000 for the construction project and $150,000 going toward the operating budget. "We are honored to be awarded a grant of this size from an internationally renowned foundation," said Elizabeth Kinney, president of the Light House board of directors and co-chair of the capital campaign.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | November 29, 2009
By this time next year, the Annapolis area will be served by a new Light House Shelter for the homeless, one that can house three times as many people as the existing shelter and adds daytime services for those in dire situations as well as expands programs to help people improve their lives. "We were turning away so many people," said Harry Cole, executive director of the Light House Shelter, recalling a decision a few years ago by the shelter's board of directors. "We did not have the capacity to serve the needs."
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
On top of one of the small hills in Dayton sits a brick house that backs up to a wooded preserve. For Michael and Hilary Yoder, it's offered a quiet place to unwind, raise children and operate a lighting business. From the breakfast area by the kitchen, walls of windows look out to the forested area and the wildlife living there. Much of the year, the choice evening spot is a wet one outdoors. The lower tier of the deck has a hot tub that seats six, and the semi-rural location of the home provides a great view of the night sky. "We go in the hot tub almost every night just to look at the stars here.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
Thanksgiving at the Light House Shelter in Annapolis will be simple and plain for those living there, without a home to call their own. But for some residents, the gathering will not be dim in hope or spirit. "Each one of us has our own stories," said Beverly Stone, a middle-age mother estranged from her family and recovering from a heart attack. "They try to make you as happy as you can be and it gives you a sense of pride." For the 15 men, five women and the handful of families who temporarily reside at the 206 West St. shelter and a few nearby apartments and houses, the turkey dinner served tomorrow will be a chance to give thanks for blessings that might not meet the eye. Some are just glad to be alive.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
The barber spent at least 20 minutes grooming his client's hair and beard. With his clippers, brush, razor and shaving cream, he skillfully tended to every detail, frequently asking the man in the chair his preferences. When the appointment was done, the men exchanged thanks and a handshake. Robert W. Cradle, the 43-year-old founder of the nonprofit Rob's Barbershop Community Foundation, does not charge for his services to the homeless and needy. His satisfaction stems from "how happy people are when they like the way they look," he said.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2008
U.S. home sales increased unexpectedly last month for the first time since the middle of last year, a sign that homebuyers are taking advantage of big drops in prices. Figures released yesterday by the National Association of Realtors show the median price of an existing home fell more than 8 percent last month from a year earlier, the largest decline since the trade group began tracking the market in 1968. Sales, on the other hand, rose in February over January, breaking a six-month downward streak.
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