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By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | February 15, 1992
In an attempt to revive its much-ignored local beer, the maker of National Bohemian has added a light brew to its line.Officials at the G. Heileman Brewing Co. said last night that they are starting to market Bohemian Light beer in an effort to recapture a larger share of the market for the brand that was once the dominant beer in Baltimore.Heileman, which emerged from federal bankruptcy protection three months ago, is making batches of 10,000 to 15,000 cases of Bohemian Light at its brewery in Halethorpe, said John Gaustad, a local spokesman.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
My most vivid childhood memories involve crabs: checking the crab pots tied to my grandparents' pier in Annapolis, picking crabs for hours at a long table in my parents' backyard, listening carefully to my grandfather's instructions about how to capture every single bit of delicious meat out of a crab. And "helping" my father steam crabs at home, in our kitchen. Steamed crabs are readily available at many Baltimore restaurants and carryout seafood houses: You can buy them already cooked and seasoned, ready to toss on the table and pick.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
My most vivid childhood memories involve crabs: checking the crab pots tied to my grandparents' pier in Annapolis, picking crabs for hours at a long table in my parents' backyard, listening carefully to my grandfather's instructions about how to capture every single bit of delicious meat out of a crab. And "helping" my father steam crabs at home, in our kitchen. Steamed crabs are readily available at many Baltimore restaurants and carryout seafood houses: You can buy them already cooked and seasoned, ready to toss on the table and pick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
For a couple of months, it's been known that Frederick-based Flying Dog would release its first canned beer this year. Now, we know the date: the first beer, the hoppy light lager Underdog Atlantic, will be in stores in April, confirmed spokeswoman Erin Biles. The cans will hit Frederick first, with Baltimore as the second targeted market. The launch comes as the brewer, the state's largest, plans its most ambitious rollout since it purchased its Maryland base in 2006. This year, it will debut 20 new beers . Biles said they see cans as an additional platform for their beer, one that's now possible thanks to improvements in bottling technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | December 29, 2005
On Nightlife You're going to the gym this year. You're going to spend at least an hour on the treadmill four times a week. Heck, you'll even put on a sweat suit and jog there, because in 2006, those 10 pounds are coming off. Yeah, right. When the weekend comes, you'll still want to drink, even though a few cold ones might counteract all those ab crunches. It's OK -- you don't have to totally abstain to lose weight. Stick to certain beverages, and watch how much you imbibe (that's the tough part)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 22, 1993
The latest in beer is the wheat beer. It is a hit in Europe, it is being tossed down by the glassfuls in Portland, Ore., taverns, and it is doing right well in Baltimore's emporiums of better suds.As its name implies, wheat beer is made with a mix of wheat and barley, instead of the traditional all-barley recipe used in most beers.The wheat and the zesty top-fermenting yeasts that work on the grain, give a wheat beer a distinctive effervescence or zing.Unlike other beers turned out by specialty brewers, wheat beer is not dark, heavy or complicated.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
This Spring, Frisco Tap and Brew House in Columbia will open a seven-barrel microbrewery under the name Push Craft Brewing.  Brewing his own beer has always been an ambition of owner Adam Carton; when he designed the restaurant, which is known for its 50 taps , he included space for a brewery. Indeed, its name suggested it was already able to make its own beer. But Carton was waiting for the business, which has been at its new location at 6695 Dobbin Road for a year, to mature.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | April 28, 1991
Just when you think that this great nation we call "America" i losing its competitive edge, something happens to remind you that, when all is said and done, we are going right down the toilet.I refer to the enthusiastic public response to my announcement that I'm running for president. Here at Campaign Headquarters our wastebaskets are overflowing with letters from Americans voicing their support ("Cancel my subscription!" "Who cuts your hair? Piranhas?" etc.). Some people sent actual contributions in the form of coupons for valuable pizza discounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
For a couple of months, it's been known that Frederick-based Flying Dog would release its first canned beer this year. Now, we know the date: the first beer, the hoppy light lager Underdog Atlantic, will be in stores in April, confirmed spokeswoman Erin Biles. The cans will hit Frederick first, with Baltimore as the second targeted market. The launch comes as the brewer, the state's largest, plans its most ambitious rollout since it purchased its Maryland base in 2006. This year, it will debut 20 new beers . Biles said they see cans as an additional platform for their beer, one that's now possible thanks to improvements in bottling technology.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 15, 1991
When you go into Racers' in Parkville, you see the things you would expect to see in a neighborhood tavern:Nicotine-stained walls and ceilings, some industrial-strength tile on the floor, a bunch of stools up against a walnut-paneled bar, and row after row of bottles.But up on a chalkboard behind the bar, you see one thing you rarely, if ever, see in a saloon:The alcohol content of each beer served."Before we put it up on the board, I would ask people what they thought the alcohol content of beer was," said Gil Osenburg, who runs the place along with his brother, Richard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
This Spring, Frisco Tap and Brew House in Columbia will open a seven-barrel microbrewery under the name Push Craft Brewing.  Brewing his own beer has always been an ambition of owner Adam Carton; when he designed the restaurant, which is known for its 50 taps , he included space for a brewery. Indeed, its name suggested it was already able to make its own beer. But Carton was waiting for the business, which has been at its new location at 6695 Dobbin Road for a year, to mature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | January 5, 2006
Fret not, brew gurus - you've still got a haunt on Light Street. When Sean Bolan's Irish Pub in Federal Hill announced its closing late last year, shockwaves went through the local beer-loving circles. The building was reopened as Clayton's Tavern, but Bolan's had been home to tastings and a long rotating list of microbrews, and patrons feared the selections would be lost with new ownership. But while business partners Amy Wright and Matt Daneker toned down the Irish element when they reopened the site two months ago, they left the beer selection fairly intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | December 29, 2005
On Nightlife You're going to the gym this year. You're going to spend at least an hour on the treadmill four times a week. Heck, you'll even put on a sweat suit and jog there, because in 2006, those 10 pounds are coming off. Yeah, right. When the weekend comes, you'll still want to drink, even though a few cold ones might counteract all those ab crunches. It's OK -- you don't have to totally abstain to lose weight. Stick to certain beverages, and watch how much you imbibe (that's the tough part)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 20, 1993
After years of feeling oddly out of sorts and not knowing quite why, I am giving up light (or lite) beer and going back to regular beer.The main reason for this decision is: I don't get hammered anymore. Well, not as much, anyway.And unless you're worried about getting hammered, there is no point in drinking light beer.People say they drink light beer because it's less filling or because they're watching their waistline, which, of course, is a bunch of hooey.The fact is, most men drink it so that at the end of the evening, there exists a chance that they won't be slumped underneath the pool table, singing "Turkey in the Straw" with their arm draped around the family basset hound, who is wearing a silly hat and reams of confetti.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 22, 1993
The latest in beer is the wheat beer. It is a hit in Europe, it is being tossed down by the glassfuls in Portland, Ore., taverns, and it is doing right well in Baltimore's emporiums of better suds.As its name implies, wheat beer is made with a mix of wheat and barley, instead of the traditional all-barley recipe used in most beers.The wheat and the zesty top-fermenting yeasts that work on the grain, give a wheat beer a distinctive effervescence or zing.Unlike other beers turned out by specialty brewers, wheat beer is not dark, heavy or complicated.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | February 15, 1992
In an attempt to revive its much-ignored local beer, the maker of National Bohemian has added a light brew to its line.Officials at the G. Heileman Brewing Co. said last night that they are starting to market Bohemian Light beer in an effort to recapture a larger share of the market for the brand that was once the dominant beer in Baltimore.Heileman, which emerged from federal bankruptcy protection three months ago, is making batches of 10,000 to 15,000 cases of Bohemian Light at its brewery in Halethorpe, said John Gaustad, a local spokesman.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 20, 1993
After years of feeling oddly out of sorts and not knowing quite why, I am giving up light (or lite) beer and going back to regular beer.The main reason for this decision is: I don't get hammered anymore. Well, not as much, anyway.And unless you're worried about getting hammered, there is no point in drinking light beer.People say they drink light beer because it's less filling or because they're watching their waistline, which, of course, is a bunch of hooey.The fact is, most men drink it so that at the end of the evening, there exists a chance that they won't be slumped underneath the pool table, singing "Turkey in the Straw" with their arm draped around the family basset hound, who is wearing a silly hat and reams of confetti.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | January 5, 2006
Fret not, brew gurus - you've still got a haunt on Light Street. When Sean Bolan's Irish Pub in Federal Hill announced its closing late last year, shockwaves went through the local beer-loving circles. The building was reopened as Clayton's Tavern, but Bolan's had been home to tastings and a long rotating list of microbrews, and patrons feared the selections would be lost with new ownership. But while business partners Amy Wright and Matt Daneker toned down the Irish element when they reopened the site two months ago, they left the beer selection fairly intact.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | April 28, 1991
Just when you think that this great nation we call "America" i losing its competitive edge, something happens to remind you that, when all is said and done, we are going right down the toilet.I refer to the enthusiastic public response to my announcement that I'm running for president. Here at Campaign Headquarters our wastebaskets are overflowing with letters from Americans voicing their support ("Cancel my subscription!" "Who cuts your hair? Piranhas?" etc.). Some people sent actual contributions in the form of coupons for valuable pizza discounts.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 15, 1991
When you go into Racers' in Parkville, you see the things you would expect to see in a neighborhood tavern:Nicotine-stained walls and ceilings, some industrial-strength tile on the floor, a bunch of stools up against a walnut-paneled bar, and row after row of bottles.But up on a chalkboard behind the bar, you see one thing you rarely, if ever, see in a saloon:The alcohol content of each beer served."Before we put it up on the board, I would ask people what they thought the alcohol content of beer was," said Gil Osenburg, who runs the place along with his brother, Richard.
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