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By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| September 15, 2014
What would it take to get you to pose like a penguin and share it for everyone on the interwebs to see? It's worth contemplating because the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is celebrating the opening of its new Penguin Coast -- which will let visitors get more up close and personal with the penguins -- with a promotion that will culminate with one person winning a lifetime family membership to the zoo. The "Penguins for Life" contest runs today through...
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
Problem gamblers would no longer be able to ban themselves from Maryland casinos for life under a change being considered to a state program designed to protect hundreds of gamblers from themselves. The Maryland State Lottery and Gaming Control Agency might remove the lifetime self-ban option because of concerns that it is excessive and redundant, Stephen Martino, the agency's director, said Tuesday. "We're probably going to change the program in the next couple of months," Martino said.
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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
How long do you think a lifetime warranty should last — as long as you live, or at least as long as the product should reasonably last? Turns out that the wording of some lifetime warranties may limit that time to a just few years. Some states even set minimum lengths for "lifetime" warranties. It's three years in California. Maryland law doesn't define how long a product's lifetime should be, but a short-term warranty described as a "lifetime" warranty would be misleading and a violation of state consumer protections, regardless of disclaimers a manufacturer or business provides, said Karen Straughn, from the Maryland attorney general's office.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry
The Baltimore Sun
| September 15, 2014
What would it take to get you to pose like a penguin and share it for everyone on the interwebs to see? It's worth contemplating because the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is celebrating the opening of its new Penguin Coast -- which will let visitors get more up close and personal with the penguins -- with a promotion that will culminate with one person winning a lifetime family membership to the zoo. The "Penguins for Life" contest runs today through...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 24, 2009
Kristen Ulloa, along with the rest of the Towson University marching band, is used to playing in front of a few hundred people, maybe even a few thousand at TU football and basketball games. But when they march in the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade Thursday, an audience approaching 50 million people will be watching. But like most of her fellow Marching Tigers, she insists she's too excited to be nervous. "This is probably the coolest thing that could happen to a band," says Ulloa, a 20-year-old junior from Finksburg who's a member of the band's color guard.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 12, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* It has been said that one way to judge the relative advancement of any culture is to consider the way it treats its elderly and its children. Unfortunately, in our current culture we entertain ourselves at the expense of children.A case in point is "Stop At Nothing," a new movie premiering on the Lifetime basic cable service at 9 tonight, with Veronica Hamel ("Hill Street Blues") and Lindsay Frost ("Mancuso: FBI").The plot involves a case with echoes of the sensationalist ongoing real-life story of young Hilary Foretich, the girl hidden by a mother who accused her former husband of sexually abusing the child.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 11, 1998
It was a year ago today that Mike Flanagan was named Orioles pitching coach for the second time. But rather than celebrate his anniversary, he might resign.No one can blame Flanagan if he leaves manager Ray Miller's staff to return to the Home Team Sports broadcast team. The former pitcher has sacrificed enough for his old team. Now it's time for him to protect his future.Perhaps Flanagan will stay out of loyalty to Miller and the organization -- that's why he agreed to return to coaching in the first place.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 25, 1991
The law that protects a woman from brutality at the hands of a male co-worker sometimes fails the woman whose husband beats, berates and otherwise brutalizes her.That message of lopsided justice is but one of many sobering ones delivered in "Prisoners of Wedlock," a 60-minute study of domestic violence, the eighth in a continuing Lifetime Television series, "Your Family Matters" (tonight at 9).The debut of this hour is timed to tie in with National Domestic Violence Awareness Month which begins Oct. 1. And each frame of the documentary is filled with tear-stained faces and voices that struggle to make sense of senseless violence.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | February 23, 2007
For once in my lifetime / I feel like a giant / I soar like an eagle / As tho' I had wings / For this is my moment / My destiny calls me / And tho' it may be just once in my lifetime / I'm gonna do great things. - "Once in a Lifetime," by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse COLUMBIA, S.C. --There she is, Miss A-mer-i-ca. There she - oh, no, sorry. It's just Hillary. But standing there center stage, surrounded by queens (the kind who wear tiaras), she looked like Miss Queen of the Universe greeting her court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | February 20, 2010
Hundreds of Annapolis-area tennis players are unhappy that they're going to be bounced off the indoor courts at the Naval Academy at the end of March, when the school will cancel what the players say were billed as lifetime tennis memberships at the Brigade Sports Complex. The players are burning up phone lines, e-mail and more, as they try to save their access to the coveted indoor courts. "My impression is that if they don't make this right, that the Naval Academy has just created a lot of ill will in the community," BSC tennis member Donna O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | July 3, 2014
A very unsettling shadow is settling over the whole American educational endeavor. It's largely a consequence of the idea that every child should graduate from high school, be admitted to college and then graduate from college. In order to make that happen, all along the way expectations would have to be lowered. That, unfortunately, involves giving in to the bigotry of low expectations. A glaring example of such low expectations was revealed in Baltimore recently. A teacher at the Career Academy gave 11 of his students answers to questions on the state High School Assessment test in biology.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Linda Rice had tried college, lasting a couple of years at Penn State while realizing that studying bloodlines, speed ratings and past performance charts for horses interested her far more than what she was studying in computer science classes. "I knew my future was somewhere else," she said. Rice returned to the family farm near Harrisburg, Pa., and went back to the life she knew growing up, when she worked with her father, Clyde, a successful trainer, her mother, Jean, and her three brothers on horse farms in Wisconsin, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 16, 2014
There is a reason I have written about the Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare") more than a dozen times (and why it is the most extensive chapter in my new book): The law is the most hurtful legislation imposed on the American people in my lifetime. But shuffling through daily bits of negative reviews is confusing. And so, as a public service, herein the latest (major) impacts to date: •We now know the Obama administration never intended for those in the individual insurance market to keep their doctor, hospital or insurance.
NEWS
By Randy Edsall | December 30, 2013
As the football coach at the University of Maryland, College Park, I consider myself fortunate to have players who have the academic foundation to be successful in college. I am not alone. College coaches nationwide have a vested interest in expanding the pipeline of young adults who are prepared for the rigors of college work. In NCAA Division I schools in particular, athletes are allowed no more than five years to graduate while receiving athletically related financial aid. And Division I schools are monitored by their Academic Progress Rate, which is calculated based on the academic eligibility and retention of each student athlete.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Brace yourself for the epic convergence of two holidays - a celebration of rich dishes, piles of sweets and family togetherness the likes of which have never before been seen and won't be repeated for more than 77,000 years. Thanksgivukkah is coming. Latkes with cranberry sauce. Turkey-shaped menorahs. Cornucopias stuffed with dreidels. Thanks to quirks of the Jewish and Gregorian calendars, Hanukkah and Thanksgiving will coincide this month for the first time since 1888, back when celebrations of both holidays were more muted.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Baltimore native, will next month receive a "lifetime achievement award for her longtime dedication to LGBT rights and her work to fight HIV/AIDS in Congress," gay leaders in Baltimore said Friday. The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore is giving Pelosi the award at its inaugural "Hometown Hero Awards & Champagne Brunch" on Nov. 17 in Baltimore, an event it expects some 500 people to attend. Matt Thorn, executive director of the GLCCB, said in a statement that Pelosi's “unending support for our community and commitment for equality make her the perfect choice for our lifetime achievement award.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | July 11, 2007
There used to be a television industry joke about Lifetime, the self-described "channel for women," that the reason its murder-mystery movies and series kept failing is that there was no suspense: The killers always had Y chromosomes. Behind the joke was almost two decades of one-dimensional characters in dramas that were drawn with heavy hands along stereotypical - and sometimes biased - gender lines. On TV Side Order of Life and State of Mind air at 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. Sunday, respectively, on Lifetime.
FEATURES
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
He'll never play piano like his idols. He doesn't have what you'd call a great voice. So what is John Alexander Jr. doing giving a concert Sunday afternoon at Light Street Presbyterian Church?There's a simple answer, but it takes some getting to. A man's whole lifetime, really. Have a listen.John Alexander Jr. is 67 years old. Two lifetimes ago, he was a young jazz man, jamming at the Eagle Lounge, at Martick's, all the bars that used to be on Charles Street between Preston and Mount Royal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
On an upper floor of the Peabody Conservatory the other day, the sound of a piano played by a single hand could be heard coming from Leon Fleisher's studio. Even through the closed, thick door, there was no mistaking the authority behind that sound. Fleisher, who turned 85 on July 23, remains one of the most compelling pianists in the world, whether playing with one hand or two - only for the past dozen or so years, thanks to Botox injections, has he enjoyed limited reuse of his right hand, immobilized nearly five decades ago because of focal dystonia.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS and THE RECORD | August 9, 2013
There are two dances, a picnic, 20 or so carnival rides, a day of water sliding and an evening of fireworks - and those aren't the main attractions. Nor are they all that's going on this week at the Ripken Baseball Complex in Aberdeen. In addition to the 40-plus baseball games featuring some of the most gifted young athletes in the world, there are a dozen or so other events ranging from a relatively mundane blood drive to a full-blown parade. The event is the week-long Cal Ripken World Series, which brings teams of 11- and 12-year-olds from across the U.S. as well as from other nations as far away as South Korea and Japan to Aberdeen for a week of world class fun, mostly at bargain basement prices.
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