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NEWS
July 18, 2014
Letter writer Mary Catalfamo claims that Planned Parenthood denies any pregnant women immediate, free access to the full spectrum of information and counseling ( "Supreme Court decisions won't limit women's rights," July 9). It's hard for me to believe she hasn't researched Planned Parenthood's many guidance programs. One can find a lot of information just by searching on the Internet under Planned Parenthood. They have trained teachers who can guide anyone through each phase of pregnancy and beyond the birth of their baby.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014
Letter writer Mary Catalfamo claims that Planned Parenthood denies any pregnant women immediate, free access to the full spectrum of information and counseling ( "Supreme Court decisions won't limit women's rights," July 9). It's hard for me to believe she hasn't researched Planned Parenthood's many guidance programs. One can find a lot of information just by searching on the Internet under Planned Parenthood. They have trained teachers who can guide anyone through each phase of pregnancy and beyond the birth of their baby.
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NEWS
March 18, 2011
In The Sun's editorial regarding parole ("Politics of parole," March 16), a very important fact is omitted. You stated that the judge would have given life without parole if he intended that the criminal never be released. However, the penalty of life without parole did not become law until 1987. Prior to then, the choice of penalties for murderers was life or capital punishment. Some of those fifty parolees that the governor is reviewing may be killers who should never be released.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
A recent letter writer spoke of the "extreme sanctimony" of people who believe a pregnancy should not be terminated by choice ("Pro-life sanctimony," March 10). His statement "please, can we call them what they really are?" - anti-abortionists - was dripping with sarcasm. The main point of the letter seemed to be that it is somehow the personal responsibility of members of the pro-life movement to develop programs that support children who otherwise would have been aborted. But shouldn't personal responsibility start with the mother and father of the unborn child?
NEWS
November 27, 2005
While Maryland's children are not considered responsible enough to buy cigarettes, vote, or sign an apartment lease, they can be sentenced to live until their dying day in prison. Legislators and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich must cooperate to repeal this illogical, unforgiving section of the legal system. The argument against kids' driving, smoking, signing leases and the like is that they are not mature enough or competent enough to decide such matters on their own. The argument for throwing them away - into adult prison to serve a mandatory life sentence - is the opposite, that they do know what they are doing.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
Saying it is unfair to remove inmates serving life sentences from the state prerelease program, a prisoners' rights group plans to protest the action tonight outside Division of Correction headquarters in Northwest Baltimore.Members of the Maryland Prison Renewal Committee said they were appalled by the division's action last month to temporarily remove lifers from the family-leave and work-release components of the prerelease program."It's not just any Tom, Dick or Harry who they allow in the prerelease program, and most lifers on work-release have done quite well," Beverly Nur, one of the committee's 150 members, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
Relieved, saddened, perplexed, angered.Such were the emotions expressed by baseball lifers after the announcement that officially terminated the 1994 baseball season. The grieving started long before Bud Selig took the podium.Yet, the finality of it still stung."How could anybody have thought it would come to this?" said Jerry Hoffberger, Orioles owner from 1965 to 1979. "It's driving me nuts. . . . I was going to a ballgame Sept. 17. I was going to take my grandkids. My next game was Sept.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
A 32-year-old convicted killer serving a life sentence failed to return from a weekend leave to a halfway house yesterday, renewing controversy over whether "lifers" sentenced to the Patuxent Institution should be allowed leaves.Charles Elmer Carpenter, who pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in the 1982 shotgun slaying of his grandmother in rural Washington County, was supposed to return by 11: 59 p.m. Sunday from a weekend leave with his sister in Arbutus, said Joseph Henneberry, director of the Patuxent Institution in Jessup.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer Staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | June 4, 1993
In the wake of a murder and two highly publicized escapes by inmates serving life sentences, all 134 lifers in the Maryland prerelease system were moved in the middle of the night to medium-security prisons, a correctional official said yesterday.The move, at least for now, effectively removes lifers from work-release and furlough programs and lesser-security facilities.More than 200 correctional and state police officers rounded up the inmates about midnight Wednesday at nine Maryland prerelease centers and bused them to their new prison assignments.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | July 17, 1993
A quiet group of about 50 people marched outside the state Division of Correction headquarters last night to protest the removal of inmates serving life sentences from the prerelease program.Carrying signs that read "Rally for Lifers" and "Lifers Need Hope," the group, including about a half-dozen children, staged the protest in Northwest Baltimore.Olinda Moyd, a spokeswoman for the group known as the Maryland Prison Renewal Committee, said the protest was staged because members are appalled by the division's decision last month to temporarily remove lifers from the family-leave and work-release programs.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
When I read the letter critical of the pro-life movement ("Pro-life sanctimony," March 10), I felt the need to respond. The author claims that the only concern pro-lifers have is the delivery of live babies, but they have no programs to help with the situation. Pro-lifers care very much about the care and well-being of the mother and her child. As one who has done volunteer work with my local pregnancy center for almost 30 years, I can attest to this fact from many years of experience.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malleyis taking steps to grant clemency to two Maryland inmates serving life sentences, including a Baltimore man convicted of murder at age 14 - the first time he has proceeded that far on such an action. Aides said public notices will be posted Wednesday that the two cases are under consideration. Officials say the notices are intended to solicit public feedback, and decisions could be made by the end of the month. During his tenure as governor, O'Malley has denied early release for 57 inmates recommended for release by the state's parole commission.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 9, 2011
It got to the point where the governor of Maryland would anticipate Melvin Bilal's words whenever he saw him. "I know what you're going to say," Martin O'Malley declared each time Mr. Bilal approached him at various public functions over the last five years. "Tarif Abdullah. " Mr. Bilal is a politically savvy Catonsville-based attorney. For several years, he's handled daunting post-conviction matters for men and women serving life sentences in Maryland prisons, including Tarif Abdullah.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 26, 2011
Anyone following the Troy Davis case to its brutal conclusion in Georgia would have noticed - and wondered about - the absence of the governor in that matter. Why weren't Mr. Davis' supporters appealing to Gov. Nathan Deal for mercy as the convicted killer's appeals ran out and questions lingered about this guilt? The answer: In Georgia, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles has the exclusive authority to grant clemency to death row inmates. By law, the governor can't intervene.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 21, 2011
On the matter of parole for convicted killers, Americans generally split into two camps, each grounded in their own morality and common sense — "Yes, sometimes" and "No, never. " Here's how I would describe the two campers: "No, never": You are moderate to conservative in your political views; you believe killers should be sentenced to life, and that no governor or parole board should change the sentence imposed by a trial judge. Many of you support the death penalty; some of you oppose it as impractical and costly, but you all support truth in sentencing: Life means life.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
The House of Delegates has joined the Senate in demanding that the governor act on recommendations by the state parole commission to free inmates serving life sentences. The House voted Friday to give the governor six months to deny a parole recommendation by the commission. Under the legislation, if the governor does not file an objection before the deadline, the inmate would be freed automatically. Lawmakers took up the measure earlier this year in frustration that Gov. Martin O'Malley had not acted on any of the 50 parole or commutation recommendations pending during his four-plus years in office.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
A group of inmates with life sentences, who had been on work release, were roused from their beds yesterday and sent back to prison in the wake of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's announcement that he will refuse parole for virtually all lifers during his term.Mr. Glendening a week ago said that he will not approve parole for inmates with life sentences for murder and rape while he is governor, with exceptions for those who are old or terminally ill.Work release has not been an option for most lifers for two years.
NEWS
March 23, 2008
At 35, Marcus Tunstall has spent more than half his life in prison. It's unlikely he'll ever get out unless a governor intervenes or the law changes. That's because Mr. Tunstall is serving life without parole for a crime he committed while a minor. He is among 15 such men who entered Maryland's prison system under this unforgiving term. Arrested as adolescents, they were too young to join the Army, not old enough to buy liquor and ineligible to vote. And yet the state consigned them to an interminable existence; their prison stay will far exceed their years on the outside.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
In The Sun's editorial regarding parole ("Politics of parole," March 16), a very important fact is omitted. You stated that the judge would have given life without parole if he intended that the criminal never be released. However, the penalty of life without parole did not become law until 1987. Prior to then, the choice of penalties for murderers was life or capital punishment. Some of those fifty parolees that the governor is reviewing may be killers who should never be released.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2011
Parris Glendening, who as governor of Maryland in the 1990s and early 2000s effectively stopped all parole possibilities for criminals serving life sentences — including hundreds who had been eligible for it after decades in prison — acknowledges that his action was driven more by politics than by hard evidence that it would make the public safer. In an e-mail to me and in a subsequent interview, Mr. Glendening said he made his famous "Life means life" speech in front of the old House of Correction in Jessup for two reasons — to convince Marylanders that killers and rapists would remain behind bars and to present life-without-parole as an alternative to the death penalty.
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