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NEWS
August 12, 2014
Your lead August 9th article, "State wants reports filed," reveals that the Maryland health department doesn't really intend to fix widespread problems related to medically fragile individuals. Ten-year-old Damaud Martin died in a LifeLine facility. Astonishingly, the state had invited LifeLine to apply for a renewed contract for such care despite the fact that it had a fake board of directors, was bankrupt, and had been investigated by police 10 times for patient neglect and abuse.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The July death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child has been ruled a homicide — six years after the Baltimore city boy's mother was accused of shaking him into a coma-like state, Baltimore police announced Monday. Damaud Martin died July 2 at an Anne Arundel County group home that state regulators were in the process of closing down for multiple problems. State health officials are investigating whether Damaud received adequate care while living at the home, which was run by a company called LifeLine, but have cautioned against drawing any premature conclusions.
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NEWS
March 29, 2012
I am a parent of two children that have received the tutoring services provided by Baltimore City Public Schools. Both of my children have IEP learning plans from lead poisoning. These services have the helped my children and allowed my son to secure a position in the high school of his choice. I would hate for the funding to go to the school districts instead of the children of Baltimore City where the services are desperately needed ("Fund classrooms, not corporations," March 27). Please do not take away the supplemental educational services tutoring program.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Relatives of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who died at an Anne Arundel County group home last month and the guardian of another resident whose inadequate care there led to a serious illness have filed notice that they intend to sue the state for failing to supervise the facility's operator. An attorney for the two former residents of LifeLine Inc.'s Laurel-area group home said he sent a formal notice to the state treasurer's office that he intends to seek monetary damages for each incident - the details of which were highlighted in a Baltimore Sun investigation of the company.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
As The Baltimore Sun investigated years of financial and regulatory problems surrounding LifeLine, a Maryland company that operated group homes for disabled adults and children, requests for comment went out to the five people listed as members of its board of directors. That produced some unusual responses. Banker Anthony T. Carpenter was listed as heading the board, according to LifeLine's December relicensing application, which The Sun obtained through a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Maryland's Board of Public Works, a panel that includes the governor and other top state officials, did little to scrutinize millions in contracts it awarded in recent years to the financially strapped operator of a group home where a 10-year-old boy died this month, records show. And state agency officials who recommended LifeLine for various contracts from 2011 through September did not mention the company's fiscal and quality problems to the board - even as they touted a new process to reward only top-quality contractors.
NEWS
By Dan Reed | November 28, 2012
In case anyone missed the news - and judging by the fact that there aren't angry mobs storming Washington, everyone missed the news - Congress recently absolved Jon Corzine of being criminally responsible for actions that "wiped out thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of customers' and creditors' money. " The congressional report states, "Choices made by Jon Corzine during his tenure as chairman and CEO sealed MF Global's fate. " Turns out, these choices include the unlawful transfer of its customers' money.
NEWS
June 9, 1993
A well-run 911 emergency telephone service can be a community's lifeline. Just as a drowning man reaches for a rope to rescue him, most citizens know instinctively to pick up the phone and dial 911 when experiencing or witnessing life-threatening calamities.For more than a year after its September 1991 inception, Howard County's 911 service was anything but well-run. Officials made the initial mistake of routing emergency and non-emergency calls alike to the number. This penny-pinching measure resulted, predictably, in a flood of calls the small staff of operators couldn't handle.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Enrollment in a controversial program that provides free cell phone service to low-income families has increased faster in Maryland than any other state in the nation, jumping nearly 90-fold since 2008 — renewing scrutiny on Capitol Hill over its management. The Lifeline program, created in 1984 to soften the impact of telephone deregulation on low-income families, had nearly 509,000 subscribers in the state last year, up from 5,821 in 2008. Growth in Maryland was nearly 40 times greater than the national average.
NEWS
Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When Maryland's government hires a company to provide around-the-clock nursing care to severely disabled foster children - arguably the state's most vulnerable residents - it requires the contractor to have its business affairs in order. But LifeLine, which attracted media attention after the recent death of a 10-year-old resident, had many signs that it was struggling financially to staff its Laurel apartments with an appropriate number of nurses. One recent indication was a sign posted on some of LifeLine's units in the Laurel-area community of Russett Green on May 12. "Payroll Alert," read the sign.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Your lead August 9th article, "State wants reports filed," reveals that the Maryland health department doesn't really intend to fix widespread problems related to medically fragile individuals. Ten-year-old Damaud Martin died in a LifeLine facility. Astonishingly, the state had invited LifeLine to apply for a renewed contract for such care despite the fact that it had a fake board of directors, was bankrupt, and had been investigated by police 10 times for patient neglect and abuse.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Maryland's health department has alerted state contractors caring for disabled adults and children that they are obligated to report incidents at their facilities that involve police, fire and medical assistance. The advisory - which comes as broader safeguards are being proposed by child advocates - was sent this week to nearly 300 professionals who work with disabled clients. Regulators said it was spurred by a recent Baltimore Sun investigation of an Anne Arundel County group home operator, LifeLine, which failed to notify regulators about numerous reports alleging abuse and neglect by its staff.
NEWS
Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
State officials said at a legislative briefing Thursday that their agencies must do more to flag financial mismanagement at group homes - problems similar to those that went unheeded at an Anne Arundel County facility where a 10-year-old disabled foster child died this month. Maryland's health and human resources secretaries appeared together before a joint committee of state lawmakers in Annapolis to answer questions about oversight of LifeLine, the operator of the group home where the boy died.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
As The Baltimore Sun investigated years of financial and regulatory problems surrounding LifeLine, a Maryland company that operated group homes for disabled adults and children, requests for comment went out to the five people listed as members of its board of directors. That produced some unusual responses. Banker Anthony T. Carpenter was listed as heading the board, according to LifeLine's December relicensing application, which The Sun obtained through a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Maryland's Board of Public Works, a panel that includes the governor and other top state officials, did little to scrutinize millions in contracts it awarded in recent years to the financially strapped operator of a group home where a 10-year-old boy died this month, records show. And state agency officials who recommended LifeLine for various contracts from 2011 through September did not mention the company's fiscal and quality problems to the board - even as they touted a new process to reward only top-quality contractors.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The death of a severely disabled foster child earlier this month while under the care of a group home in Anne Arundel County that Maryland health regulators were in the process of shutting down inevitably raises the question of whether the boy's life could have been saved if state officials had acted more quickly. The state has launched three separate investigations into 10-year-old Damaud Martin's death, but the results may not be known for months. Regardless of whether anything could have changed Damaud's fate, though, the investigative reporting by The Sun's Doug Donovan into the troubled history of LifeLine raises real questions about whether the state's oversight of such care providers is adequate to protect some of the state's most vulnerable young people.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Maryland's health department has alerted state contractors caring for disabled adults and children that they are obligated to report incidents at their facilities that involve police, fire and medical assistance. The advisory - which comes as broader safeguards are being proposed by child advocates - was sent this week to nearly 300 professionals who work with disabled clients. Regulators said it was spurred by a recent Baltimore Sun investigation of an Anne Arundel County group home operator, LifeLine, which failed to notify regulators about numerous reports alleging abuse and neglect by its staff.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
There is every reason to doubt the seriousness of the proposal by Russia — quickly seconded by Syria — to turn over the Middle Eastern nation's chemical weapons stockpile to the international community for destruction as a way to avert possible U.S. military strikes. The turnaround for those two nations is too abrupt, and the timing too suspect, for us to put much hope into it. However, President Barack Obama is right to pursue it vigorously — not only because military action should be a last resort but also because the proposal offers the chance for a much more comprehensive response to Syrian President Bashar Assad's use of chemical weapons than cruise missile strikes could.
NEWS
Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Maryland lawmakers and child advocates called Monday for an investigation into regulators' oversight of a troubled group home operator, asking why the state continued to give the company millions in taxpayer dollars despite long-standing financial and regulatory problems. State Sen. Joan Carter Conway, chairman of a committee that oversees group homes, said she would call a hearing this month to determine why state officials continued to award contracts to LifeLine even after it had filed for bankruptcy reorganization and a state audit found it insolvent.
NEWS
Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When Maryland's government hires a company to provide around-the-clock nursing care to severely disabled foster children - arguably the state's most vulnerable residents - it requires the contractor to have its business affairs in order. But LifeLine, which attracted media attention after the recent death of a 10-year-old resident, had many signs that it was struggling financially to staff its Laurel apartments with an appropriate number of nurses. One recent indication was a sign posted on some of LifeLine's units in the Laurel-area community of Russett Green on May 12. "Payroll Alert," read the sign.
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