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By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Edward Rybolt considers himself lucky to have received another chance. A heroin habit nearly destroyed his life, damaging his relationships with his family and driving him to a bank robbery attempt that netted him a 10-year prison sentence. Paroled after serving three years, sober and gainfully employed, Rybolt credits an unusual corrections program that allows inmates to spend their days caring for retired racehorses. It's an opportunity that he says helped build the compassion and patience he'd need to re-enter society.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
City officials hope hundreds of boys and young men will participate in a new B'More Night Hoops league that will combine basketball and life skills workshops this spring and summer. The program, to be announced Thursday, will be open to boys and men ages 15 to 21. Before the teams hit the courts each week, they will discuss applying for college, finding jobs and managing personal finances, officials said. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the idea is to provide higher-quality recreational outlets for the city's youths.
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FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg | January 23, 2014
Holding a 3-inch-tall Tolkien-inspired wizard named Schmandalf that she fashioned out of modeling clay, Olivia Hatcher set about the painstaking process of creating a stop-motion film for her summer camp class. Using one of Maryvale Preparatory School's digital single-lens reflex cameras affixed to a tripod -- instead of holding a camera phone or a “point-and-shoot” with no adjustable settings -- the fifth-grader from Towson posed and re-posed Schmandalf to simulate human movements while photographing the figurine a couple hundred times between adjustments.
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg | January 23, 2014
Holding a 3-inch-tall Tolkien-inspired wizard named Schmandalf that she fashioned out of modeling clay, Olivia Hatcher set about the painstaking process of creating a stop-motion film for her summer camp class. Using one of Maryvale Preparatory School's digital single-lens reflex cameras affixed to a tripod -- instead of holding a camera phone or a “point-and-shoot” with no adjustable settings -- the fifth-grader from Towson posed and re-posed Schmandalf to simulate human movements while photographing the figurine a couple hundred times between adjustments.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 4, 1995
CLEAR SPRING -- Jonny Barr and hundreds of other sophomores in Washington County have spent a regular part of their school year learning how to balance checkbooks, write resumes, shop for auto insurance and even how to be parents -- skills they'll need for life after high school.Some knowledge of guns and safety around water also are among the topics being taught Jonny, 16, and his classmates.It's part of a comprehensive, yearlong course about health and life skills that Washington County educators initiated this year.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
As the father of two boys who prefer to spend their computer time with baseball simulations or galactic war games, I've spent an inordinate amount of time looking at educational software over the last year.I have some good news and bad news.The good news is that educational software is better than ever, with superb graphics, plenty of entertainment value and solid educational content.The bad news is that the good news may not matter.As my older boy, Ike, once said to me when I sat him down in front of what I thought was a terrific early reading program, "Daddy, I do this all day in school.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2001
THE CLASS of 2001 has departed Oakland Mills High School, but the gift its members left behind will benefit a group of students for years to come. The class donated $1,000 for new computer equipment for the school's Academic Life Skills program, a special education program for students with disabilities. "It was a complete surprise," said Brad Howell, one of the Life Skills teachers. "We were so touched." The Life Skills program gives specialized instruction, in a school setting, to students ages 14 to 21 with conditions such as mental retardation, autism, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy, Howell said.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | July 8, 2007
The program is designed to teach kids how to play golf. But on a recent afternoon about 20 children ranging in age from 7 to 17 gathered in the clubhouse at Wetlands Golf Course in Aberdeen to practice proper handshaking technique. They also worked on how to introduce themselves. Once the 15-minute life skills session was completed, the children headed outside to hone their golf skills. "We start out learning how to meet and greet people, and how to just be nicer," said Emily Rippel, a 14-year-old Bel Air resident.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
It could have been just another summer, hanging around the '' house, looking for things to do. But for about 385 Harford County young people and another 200 in Cecil, the summer has been filled with learning "life skills" and getting some practical job experience.The first appeal was the money, according to youths in the program, like 18-year-old Dawn West. "Jobs are hard to find because everyone wants someone who is older and has experience," she said. Ms. West graduated from Havre de Grace High in June.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
Last summer, 12-year-old Crystal Smith spent almost every day sitting on the couch in her East Baltimore home, watching TV. This summer, she's painting furniture, creating mosaics, earning money and planning to sell her artwork at Artscape. Crystal and 12 other young people are getting paid to make art and learn basic job skills through a program funded by the Abell Foundation and run by the Rose Street Community Center and Art with a Heart, a nonprofit that brings art instruction to communities in need.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
What's the hardest lesson you've learned so far? "To be OK with making myself vulnerable in order to make the change that I know is important. " What's a fact about yourself that will surprise people? "I get my makeup tips from RuPaul. I watch his 'Drag Race' show in freeze frame so I can get good tips. " What do you do to relax? "I love hanging out with my family and friends and going out to dinner, since I don't relish cooking at all. I particularly enjoy when I get to hang out with my mom and my daughter, the three of us. " Your (other)
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Mixing kids and coffee is typically ill advised, but in the case of Brian and Holly Gray, the combination has yielded pleasant results. Last August the couple opened Creating Unlimited Possibilities — CUPs — Coffeehouse in Southwest Baltimore's Hollins Market community to give disconnected youth a chance to gain basic job and life skills. Like the Rev. C.W. Harris, who was profiled in a previous Sun article, their work was awarded a $15,000 grant by BMe (Black Male Engagement)
SPORTS
By Rhiannon Walker and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2012
Charles Greene II lay immersed in a pool of his sweat as the snow and rain collected around him on the Johns Hopkins track. It was December 1982 and Greene had just completed his six-minute mile, which was required of anyone trying out for coach Dick Oles' Blue Jays fencing team. But he was exhausted and felt unable to walk to Oles' office, which led some other students trying out to ask Oles whether they should help him. The coach's response? Leave him until he was able to get to the fencing room on his own. Though his legs wouldn't carry him, Greene was able to crawl to the room, where he again fell, prompting the students a second time to ask whether they should move him. And again, Oles said no. He reasoned that Greene would move when he's ready or when he was tired of being stepped on. "[That was one of my fondest memories]
NEWS
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Edward Rybolt considers himself lucky to have received another chance. A heroin habit nearly destroyed his life, damaging his relationships with his family and driving him to a bank robbery attempt that netted him a 10-year prison sentence. Paroled after serving three years, sober and gainfully employed, Rybolt credits an unusual corrections program that allows inmates to spend their days caring for retired racehorses. It's an opportunity that he says helped build the compassion and patience he'd need to re-enter society.
SPORTS
By Eric Garland, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
While Anne Harrington was mourning the loss of close friend Lee Griffin 10 years ago, she asked herself whether there was a way to create a living legacy to honor him. She quickly found her answer: Box of Rain. Box of Rain is an organization that mentors disadvantaged children ages 9-14 through maritime activity. Harrington, along with others, founded the organization in 2003 and named it after Griffin's boat, which he named after a Grateful Dead song. But despite the weather the name might suggest, Box of Rain children thrived under the resplendent sun as they paddled into the shore of Spa Creek on a surprisingly mild June morning.
EXPLORE
January 20, 2012
Local homeless service providers, community volunteers, local police agencies and the Harford County government will come together Wednesday, Jan. 25, in a coordinated effort to conduct a one day count of homeless persons in Harford County. According to the Harford County Department of Community Services, like many communities, Harford County has many who are living in places not meant for human habitation; outside and unsheltered, or who are relying daily on some form of emergency housing.
NEWS
January 24, 2007
Call to schedule help with taxes The Annapolis and Pascal senior centers are taking appointments to meet with an income tax assistant starting next month. State and federal income tax returns will be electronically filed directly from the center. This service is free, regardless of age, but is limited to simple personal tax returns. Volunteers sought to teach life skills The Anne Arundel County Department of Aging is seeking volunteer grandparents to work with children for 15 to 20 hours a week.
NEWS
September 4, 1997
The South Baltimore Learning Center in the first block of E. Ostend St. is seeking volunteers to be trained as classroom assistants and tutors in math, reading and life skills.Volunteers must be at least 18, have a high school diploma or its equivalent and be willing to commit to one year of tutoring.Information: 410 625-4215.Pub Date: 9/04/97
EXPLORE
December 15, 2011
The Linwood Center , in Ellicott City, received $50,000 from the Marion I. and Henry J. Knott Foundation to fund its supported employment program for adults with autism. Linwood provides education, employment and residential services for children and adults with autism and related developmental disabilities. The Knott Foundation grant will help fund Linwood's efforts to engage transitioning youth and adults with autism in work opportunities consistent with their interests.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
Editor: After 39 years of teaching Life Skills (Family and Consumer Sciences), formerly known as Home Economics, to approximately 15,000 students, I have decided to retire. North Harford Middle School has been my base for 34 of those years and Havre de Grace Middle School the previous five years. Those years have afforded many wonderful teaching experiences and I hope that my students have enjoyed their time in my classroom as much as I have enjoyed watching them learn and mature.  Some of my students experienced their very first candlelight meal with a formal table setting; others enjoyed learning to cook delectable dishes; still others were able to sew items for themselves or for gifts. Hopefully, all of them learned the value of a dollar and the economics of running a household, babysitting skills, first aid, as well as the importance of community service. I am deeply grateful to the parents of my students and to the many businesses that supported our various school projects. A special thanks to Saubels, formerly Graceton, for all the patience, kindness and great service they provided me for my classroom.
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