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NEWS
May 24, 1991
The Greater Baltimore Committee yesterday issued a report, "Baltimore: Where Science Comes to Life," which recommended making the city "a global life sciences community." Following are excerpts from the report. BALTIMORE boasts a diverse economy dominated by a large number of small- and medium-sized employers. The region has an outstanding strategic location close to the nation's capital and in the middle of the prosperous mid-Atlantic region. The area contains a solid physical infrastructure with strong transportation and communication networks.
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NEWS
June 23, 2014
A recent editorial ( "Maryland's stagnant economy," June 12) and news article ( "A bumpy year for Maryland's economy," June 15) made some valid points about Maryland's economy but overlooked much of the work done in recent years to expand new and emerging pillars of the state's job base. The editorial suggested that Maryland pursue "a blended approach where a sector with enormous growth potential like cybersecurity … is cultivated not only by government-funded organizations like the National Security Agency at Fort Meade and Maryland's research universities but by fostering private investment and entrepreneurship, start-ups and business incubators.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1997
The Baltimore City Board of Estimates voted yesterday to lease a building from the state for five years and convert it for use as a life-sciences facility for growth-stage companies.The state will spend $250,000 to renovate and upgrade laboratories in the Bard Building on the harbor campus of Baltimore City Community College.The city will pay $291,000 annually, but expects to recoup $182,000 annually through lease payments from tenants.While Baltimore will run a deficit on the project, it hopes the venture will pay off in creating jobs and giving biotechnology and life-sciences companies a boost, said M. J. Brodie, president of the Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Feng Tao | October 14, 2013
Rockville researchers are on the cusp of developing the first-ever malaria vaccine. The impact on global health would be revolutionary - the mosquito-borne disease sickens 200 million people each year and claims more than half a million lives. This latest breakthrough is just one of many flowing from Maryland's biotech companies. Our bioscience sector is now poised to lead the fight against a long list of diseases - from cancer to Alzheimer's. And while medical innovation has significant health benefits, advances in the life sciences have also had tremendous spillover gains for our state's economy.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
The Schmoke administration is inching toward creating a life sciences high school that would give students intensive math and science training to prepare them for careers in biotechnology and medicine.Based on a recommendation by a committee of businessmen and educators set up by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, the mayor has agreed to hire a consultant to consider the feasibility of a life sciences high school.The consultant would weigh a number of issues, including whether it would be better to create a separate high school or to beef up the city school system's math and science curriculum, said William Jews, who headed the committee.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 18, 1991
Talking about building a Baltimore economy based on biomedical businesses was easy.Now comes the hard part -- pulling it off.That task falls to the Greater Baltimore Committee, which announced its shining vision of Baltimore's economic future in May, amid much fanfare. "Baltimore: Where Science Comes to Life" laid down a collective gauntlet to educators, businesspeople and politicians to transform the region's economy from one based on smokestacks to test tubes.It's early yet to gauge accurately how far away that objective might be, GBC Deputy Director Tom J. Chmura said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | May 10, 1992
A year after the business community dubbed Baltimore the city where science comes to life, most residents still haven't a clue as to what the life sciences are.But state and city leaders say that by the end of the century every school child, taxi driver, plumber and pinstriped lawyer will come to see life sciences as the city's economic engine, chugging out $150 million in new taxes for Maryland and 60,000 new jobs by the end of the decade.At the heart would be science-based businesses and institutions -- everything from the Maryland Science Center to hospitals such as Johns Hopkins to companies that make genetically engineered plants or food additives from algae.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker Martin Evans of The Sun's Metro Desk contributed to this report | May 24, 1991
In another decade or so, life sciences will form the backbone of the region's economy, the Greater Baltimore Committee said yesterday.The Baltimore area will enjoy an international reputation for life sciences businesses, in much the way California's Silicon Valley does for computers, and thousands of city residents will be employed in high-paying, highly skilled jobs within the life sciences field, according to a report unveiled last night by the GBC.The...
NEWS
By ROBERT KELLER | May 26, 1991
Great communities hoping to prosper in times of economic change need a strong sense of direction.For years, Pittsburgh was a steel town. It is now transforming itself into a computer software center. Miami was known for tourism and citrus but is becoming an international gateway to Latin America. Singapore, once a low-wage manufacturing site, is emerging as an international center for finance and research and development. Each of these regions made strategic choices and acted to carve new roles for itself in the 21st century.
NEWS
By ROBERT KELLER | May 24, 1992
Some of the first indications that Baltimore was truly poised to become the place "where science comes to life" came not in the laboratories of Johns Hopkins or the high-tech incubator at Bayview but in a crowded hall at St. Elizabeth's Church near Patterson Park one night last fall. It was at the annual meeting of the Southeast Community Organization, known as SECO.There, blacks and whites, senior citizens and students, the families of longshoremen and factory workers that comprise SECO saw the first glimmers of Baltimore's economic future.
EXPLORE
March 4, 2013
GETTYSBURG COLLEGE: The following local students at Gettysburg College have been placed on the fall 2012 Deans' Commendation List, which requires point average in the range of 3.300 to 3.599 for a semester's work: Michael Hoppes of Baldwin, Shannon Kelley of Joppa, Daniel Moorhead of Baldwin, Shelby Creamer of Baldwin, Rachel Dinsmore of Forest Hill, Alexandra Dunn of Joppa, Sarah Kanely of Joppa and Lauren Satterfield of Joppa. BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC: William Melones of Abingdon, Harry Foard of Forest Hill and Samuel O'Hare of Churchville have earned placement on the dean's list for the 2012 fall semester at Berklee College of Music.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Many people have heard of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg or Google co-founder Sergey Brin. But few know about Bert Vogelstein, a Johns Hopkins scientist who helped map the cancer genome and created gene and stool tests to detect colon cancer. A new, international award, similar to the Nobel Prize, but with a bigger payout of $3 million, aims to change that. On Wednesday, Zuckerberg and Brin joined Russian entrepreneur and venture capitalist Yuri Milner and Anne Wojcicki, founder of genetic testing company 23andMe, to launch the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
NEWS
By Jacob S. Sherkow | February 18, 2013
As the economy continues to flounder, many cities are looking for ways to replicate Silicon Valley's financial success. When seeking to catch the magic of those biggest successes - Apple, Google and Facebook - the word "innovation" gets thrown around frequently. And as intellectual property is taking on a larger and larger role in how companies do business in the Bay Area, many have equated innovation with patents. A recent Sun article about innovation in Baltimore and Maryland focused on just that.
NEWS
By Brian Gaines | January 22, 2013
This month Marylanders learned that Education Week had named our state's schools the best in the nation for the fifth year in a row. Credit goes to our students, educators, parents and policy makers for this exciting recognition. But as CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to science education, I would caution against excess celebration. A closer look at recent test scores reveals that we must improve how we educate our students in science, a discipline that is vital to success in the 21st century economy.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Uncertainty over the economy contributed to a nearly 27 percent drop last year in venture capital funding for young companies in Maryland, Washington and Northern Virginia, the first decrease since 2009, according to a new report from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Last year, venture capitalists invested $725.1 million in 164 deals in the area, down from $987.5 million for 163 deals in 2011. On a percentage basis, the decrease in dollars was more than twice the national average for last year, when funding dropped 10 percent to $26.5 billion invested in nearly 3,700 deals, PricewaterhouseCoopers reported.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
A proposal to speed the approval of new prescription drugs has patient advocates and biotech firms — including many based in Maryland — hoping that Congress will deliver a rare dose of bipartisanship this year. Lawmakers are proposing a 6 percent increase in the fees that pharmaceutical firms pay the Food and Drug Administration to offset the cost of approving new drugs. If the measure is not signed into law by the end of September, the FDA would lose the ability to charge any fees and be forced to lay off 2,000 workers, significantly slowing review times.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
It's the classic fable of the war being lost for the want of a nail.But in this case, what is needed is laboratory and medical technicians to become the workhorses of an industry thatbusiness leaders believe will drive Baltimore's economic growth in the next decade.Medical institutions as large as Johns Hopkins Hospital and biotechnology companies with less than a few hundred employees say they are hunting for talented high school and college graduates who could fuel the life sciences industry.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | June 2, 1991
The Baltimore region's life sciences institutions and businesses are an economic gold mine.That's what the Greater Baltimore Committee keeps saying as it promotes its vision of a local economy centered on the life sciences.That vision calls for dramatic growth among the area's latticework of companies, universities and hospitals.Yet it's clear that private companies need to gather strength before the vision comes to pass. The city's most prominent biotech companies, such as Nova Pharmaceutical Corp.
NEWS
By Michael Knapp | October 4, 2011
The Dow takes another tumble, there is one more lackluster report on unemployment, and attention in Maryland turns once again to how to improve the local economy. There have been well-intentioned efforts to stimulate the economy, but there is also an element of wishful thinking in many of these efforts — the thought being that enough bailing twine and chewing gum can hold things together long enough for the economy to improve. However, the situation in Maryland requires a fundamental change in how we do business.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp. was started in the mid-1980s by a group of defense and aerospace scientists who wanted to study the effects of algae on humans in long-term spaceflight. The Columbia-based company's improbable history has taken several turns since then, as the scientists eventually found market success with an algae-derived nutritional supplement for infant formulas. And on Tuesday, Martek was acquired for $1.1 billion by Dutch company Royal DSM, the world's largest producer of vitamins.
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