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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2003
SEATTLE - Mars is about to be invaded by three successive spacecraft carrying sophisticated scientific instruments, six-wheeled robotic "rovers" and two sundials from Seattle. The planned landing on Christmas Day of Britain's Beagle 2 will be followed by two NASA probes, Spirit and Opportunity, which will land in January. The general purpose of the missions is to find evidence of life, or past life. What does a sundial have to do with this and why on Earth would it come from soggy, cloudy Seattle?
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Description: Unusual proteins within microbes allow the organisms to survive in cold and salty conditions in Antarctica, and could in theory help support life on Mars as well, according to NASA-funded study at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The study revealed slight differences between core proteins in ordinary organisms and those known as Haloarchaea, which can live in severe conditions with extreme salinity or temperatures, for example. They studied such microbes from Deep Lake, a salty body of water in Antarctica, and found that atoms within the core proteins were more loosely connected, "allowing them to be more flexible and functional," DasSarma said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1996
The Martians of summer are facing a hard winter. Their very survival is in question.New research has cast a cold shadow over the sensational claims made in August that a meteorite that fell on Antarctica carried chemical and possibly fossil evidence of primitive life on early Mars -- microbial Martians.The possibility revived speculation about life on other worlds, an idea ever latent in science and the human imagination, and seemed to provide additional impetus for projects to explore the neighboring planet, including two American spacecraft now on their way.But independent tests conducted since the meteorite announcement have shown that the supposed evidence for Martian life can be explained in nonbiological terms, scientists said.
NEWS
November 28, 2011
Is there life elsewhere in the universe? It's a question that has long intrigued astronomers and science fiction buffs alike, and now the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has launched its most ambitious attempt yet to find the answer. Curiosity, NASA's 1-ton wheeled rover vehicle, blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center on Saturday for the 346 million-mile journey to Mars, where it will spend two years roaming the Red Planet's surface in search of tell-tale organic compounds that could signal the presence of life there, either now or in the distant past.
NEWS
November 6, 1996
THE LAST TIME NASA sent a satellite to Mars it disappeared, giving conspiracy theorists fuel to insist extraterrestrials had destroyed the probe and the government was covering it up. Space agency scientists eventually conjectured that Mars Observer malfunctioned and exploded three days before it was to enter Mars orbit in August 1993. But that is just a theory. No one really knows what happened. Better luck is expected with Mars Global Surveyor, which begins a 10-month journey to the planet tomorrow.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2003
Eight days after arriving on the rock-strewn Martian plain of Chryse Planitia, Viking 1 sank its stainless steel claw scoop into the rust-tinted soil. It was 3:30 a.m. July 28, 1976. The first search for life on another world had begun. But far from settling the question of extraterrestrial life, the expedition showed just how difficult it is to answer. Viking's verdict: Mars is and always was dead. In the years since, however, scientists have questioned whether the spacecraft's instruments were sensitive enough.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Working late in their laboratory, two NASA scientists were startled when their electron microscope scanned across a tiny, segmented structure that looked for all the world like a string of primitive bacteria, fossilized in rock."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 2, 2001
To paraphrase a late, great American: A trillion here and a trillion there and pretty soon you are into real money. NASA scientists say there used to be life on Mars. (Martian scientists return the compliment.) You are supposed to save historic structures, if you do, before they start knocking them down. The longer Al Gore stays out of sight, the better he looks to his party.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
HAS GEOLOGY ever been more inspiring? Suddenly, a handful of rocks can fire the imagination. It helps, of course, that the rocks in question come from a crater on Mars. Maybe you missed the news, but in an article published Friday, government scientists say rocks examined by NASA's Mars rovers are sedimentary. That means they accumulated layer by layer in water. That's right, water. Good old two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen. The rocks prove beyond a doubt that the red planet used to have water like Earth has water -- and not just the frozen stuff, but in liquid form, too. The authors aren't certain how the water got there, but they suspect it was present hundreds of thousands of years ago. It might have covered tens of thousands of square miles.
NEWS
August 9, 1996
LIFE ON MARS was first suggested in 1877 by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli. He described straight lines on the surface of the red planet as "canali," by which he meant channels, which Americans translated as canals.His breakthrough was elucidated in 1908 by the American astronomer Percival Lowell. He mapped more than 400 canals, intersecting at dark spots he called oases, hypothesizing they -- were dug by intelligent beings to convey water from polar ice caps to deserts.These men were not kooks but scientists on the cutting edge of theory and knowledge.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Three of fall's most anticipated new series premiere tonight, and taken together, they offer a near-perfect snapshot of the state of network TV today - for better or worse. There are talented stars and bits of strong writing in each of the two dramas and one sitcom, but there is little originality or inspiration. Two are knockoffs of BBC and Australian TV series, and the other is a Jerry Bruckheimer assembly-line procedural (Think: Without a Trace). They are, however, about as good as network TV is going to get in this era of decline, and each has its moments, small as they may be. ABC's "Life On Mars" Who could not find something to like in a cop drama that features Harvey Keitel and Michael Imperioli?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | October 5, 2008
BOOKS David Sedaris: The wickedly funny David Sedaris, whose tales of midget guitar teachers and licking light switches have earned him a cultlike following, is on the road again. The best-selling author will visit 34 cities this fall, testing new material that could end up in his next book. The crowds will even have a chance to ask him questions. He speaks at 8 tonight at the Meyerhoff. For more: ticketmaster.com DVD 'The Visitor': Richard Jenkins stars as a disaffected professor whose life is reshaped after discovering immigrant squatters in his little-used New York flat.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
HAS GEOLOGY ever been more inspiring? Suddenly, a handful of rocks can fire the imagination. It helps, of course, that the rocks in question come from a crater on Mars. Maybe you missed the news, but in an article published Friday, government scientists say rocks examined by NASA's Mars rovers are sedimentary. That means they accumulated layer by layer in water. That's right, water. Good old two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen. The rocks prove beyond a doubt that the red planet used to have water like Earth has water -- and not just the frozen stuff, but in liquid form, too. The authors aren't certain how the water got there, but they suspect it was present hundreds of thousands of years ago. It might have covered tens of thousands of square miles.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2003
SEATTLE - Mars is about to be invaded by three successive spacecraft carrying sophisticated scientific instruments, six-wheeled robotic "rovers" and two sundials from Seattle. The planned landing on Christmas Day of Britain's Beagle 2 will be followed by two NASA probes, Spirit and Opportunity, which will land in January. The general purpose of the missions is to find evidence of life, or past life. What does a sundial have to do with this and why on Earth would it come from soggy, cloudy Seattle?
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2003
Eight days after arriving on the rock-strewn Martian plain of Chryse Planitia, Viking 1 sank its stainless steel claw scoop into the rust-tinted soil. It was 3:30 a.m. July 28, 1976. The first search for life on another world had begun. But far from settling the question of extraterrestrial life, the expedition showed just how difficult it is to answer. Viking's verdict: Mars is and always was dead. In the years since, however, scientists have questioned whether the spacecraft's instruments were sensitive enough.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Spherix Inc. traces its origins to outer space and its future fortunes, in part, to manure. So it isn't surprising that company President David Affeldt has learned to brace himself for wisecracks. "Are you guys as far up in orbit as Mars?" one smart aleck recently asked him as the two talked business. It doesn't help that its product offerings, while down to earth, can seem a wacky combination. At one end of Spherix's Beltsville headquarters, headset-wearing employees staff a call center, handling everything from questions about drugs for pharmaceutical companies to a state child-support hot line.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | September 14, 1992
New Hopkins dean promoting researchFTCThe new associate dean for research at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Engineering has his work cut out for him, to say the least.Theodore O. Poehler, who succeeded Vice Provost Jared L. Cohon on Sept. 1, has taken over the task of promoting commercialization of Johns Hopkins-based research, looking for support in the business community.That's a tall order in the current economy, which has found many businesses, including long-term industrial friends of Hopkins, looking for ways to trim costs.
NEWS
By Howard Kleinberg | August 20, 1996
IS THERE nothing without a political propensity these days? There is something strongly suspicious about the sudden discovery of minuscule, primordial life on Mars. It comes at a time when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is fighting for its fiscal life with a conservative Congress.One might question how long NASA has been sitting on this one, using it possibly as a wild card in a poker game, a get-out-of-jail-free ticket in a turn of Monopoly.The announcement has set in motion, among some, a tumult to race to Mars to find other millions of years old pieces of life -- if, indeed, there ever was life on Mars.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 2, 2001
To paraphrase a late, great American: A trillion here and a trillion there and pretty soon you are into real money. NASA scientists say there used to be life on Mars. (Martian scientists return the compliment.) You are supposed to save historic structures, if you do, before they start knocking them down. The longer Al Gore stays out of sight, the better he looks to his party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1996
The Martians of summer are facing a hard winter. Their very survival is in question.New research has cast a cold shadow over the sensational claims made in August that a meteorite that fell on Antarctica carried chemical and possibly fossil evidence of primitive life on early Mars -- microbial Martians.The possibility revived speculation about life on other worlds, an idea ever latent in science and the human imagination, and seemed to provide additional impetus for projects to explore the neighboring planet, including two American spacecraft now on their way.But independent tests conducted since the meteorite announcement have shown that the supposed evidence for Martian life can be explained in nonbiological terms, scientists said.
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