Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLife Expectancy
IN THE NEWS

Life Expectancy

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Did you know that experts predict our children will be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents? You ask, why? Today, children drink more sugar-sweetened beverages than their parents, as children. Too much sugar in the diet, especially in liquid form, has been linked to development of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and many more diseases. Sugar-sweetened beverages supply half of the added sugar in the diets of 12-17-year-olds and one-third of the added sugar in diets of 2-5-year-olds.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Newspapers | June 15, 2011
Women in large swaths of America are dying younger than they were a generation ago, reversing nearly a century of progress in public health and underscoring the rising toll of smoking and record obesity. Nationwide, life expectancy for American men and women has risen over the past two decades, and some U.S. communities still boast life expectancies as long as any in the world, according to newly released data. But over the past decade, the nation has experienced a widening gap between the most and least healthy places to live.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
In large swaths of the nation, life expectancy slipped in the decade that ended in 2007, particularly for women, a shocking development in the world’s wealthiest nation. Some communities — primarily wealthy ones — have some of the longest life expectancies in the world, but others, particularly rural areas in Appalachia and the Deep South and some poor urban neighborhoods, fare worse than many third world countries. This news comes at a time when the Republican candidates for president are universally denouncing a national health care reform law designed to reduce health inequalities and to remake a system that spends more than any other nation and gets worse results.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Life expectancy for black people in the United States has dropped substantially, continuing a four-year decline, federal health experts said yesterday.The drop was sharper than the one in the previous year, and it was large enough that it helped reduce the overall life expectancy for Americans, the National Center for Health Statistics said.The new data gave the life expectancy for babies born in 1988, the latest year for which figures have been analyzed.The figures also showed a further widening in the gap between the life expectancy for whites and blacks, a trend that federal officials and health experts described as alarming.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Murder and AIDS joined forces to reduce life expectancy among blacks in 1988, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said yesterday in its annual report on the state of American health. The report found that an overall health gap between blacks and whites continued to widen.At the same time, there was some encouraging news: Preliminary figures showed the death rate in 1990 of American infants took its sharpest drop in a decade.The life expectancy of a black male dropped from 65.2 years in 1987 to 64.9 years in 1988 -- the last year for which final figures were available -- primarily because of an increase in deaths from homicide and acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the report said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Americans generally are living longer than ever, but the life expectancy of blacks is continuing to shorten alarmingly, the Department of Health and Human Services reports.In its annual compilation of statistics on the population's well-being, the department said that while life expectancy among the nation as a whole rose to a record 75.2 years last year, that for blacks fell to 69.2 years.It also confirmed that the rate of infant mortality nationwide dropped sharply last year from 9.7 deaths for every 1,000 live births in 1989 to 9.1 deaths -- the lowest rate ever -- but that of blacks remained at levels more than twice as high as for whites.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1997
Stung by the type of national attention no city wants, Baltimore's health commissioner branded as unfair a Harvard study that found the city had some of the worst life expectancies in a comparison of 2,077 locales across the country.The study, by Dr. Christopher Murray of the Harvard University School of Public Health, found that Baltimore had the third-shortest life expectancy for men and the second-shortest for women. Life expectancy for men was 63.04 years; for women, it was 73.27 years.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The life expectancy of Americans has gone up another notch and infant mortality has declined, government statisticians revealed yesterday, but deaths among young people from AIDS and violence continue to mount.The annual report of the National Center for Health Statistics showed that in 1989 fatalities for 10 of the 15 leading causes of death declined, when the numbers were adjusted to eliminate the effect of the aging of the population.The average baby born in 1989 could expect to live 75.3 years, a record high, and the mortality of infants declined to 9.8 deaths per 1,000 live births, a record low.However, Dr. Marian MacDorman, a mortality analyst at the government center, said death certificates showed acquired immune deficiency syndrome and violence hitting hard at Americans in their productive years.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. suggests raising the qualifying age for Social Security to 70 because "we are living much longer than originally envisioned; our benefits should reflect this fact of life" ( "Nine ideas to revive the Republican Party," Feb. 9). First of all, there is ample evidence that in 1935, when Social Security launched, the actuaries of the Roosevelt administration knew full well that life expectancy at age 65 would gradually extend. So Mr. Ehrlich is simply wrong on his history.
NEWS
By Oxiris Barbot | October 21, 2013
Tomorrow's planned release of the Healthy Baltimore 2015 Interim Status Report says a lot about the health of our city. The banner headline is that the health status of Baltimore City residents looks brighter than it did just a few years ago. The follow up, and perhaps more newsworthy message, is that we are closing the gap in racial and ethnic disparities for many of the leading health indicators. When the Healthy Baltimore 2015 plan was released in May of 2011, we were clear that improving health outcomes required each of us, whether individually or through our organizations, to commit to addressing the underlying issues that drove poor health outcomes and that no single sector of our civil society could do this alone nor claim sole credit or bare sole blame.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
We applaud the work of the public and nonprofit agencies that seek out uninsured Marylanders to enroll in health insurance programs ( "Maryland seeks uninsured to inform about health reform Sept. 7). Research shows that having insurance reduces health disparities and improves well-being. The lengths to which these folks must go shows again the folly of Obamacare. No other advanced nation has to find people who don't have insurance - because everyone has insurance. Each dollar spent in outreach and enrollment is diverted from the actual delivery of health care.
NEWS
By Sandra Hofferth | July 15, 2013
Here's another reason the dysfunctional federal budget process is bad for Americans: besides hurting the economy and hitting us in the pocketbook, partisan feuding over budget cuts could undermine our health and even shorten our lives. That's because House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and others in Congress have been using the budget process to target research in the behavioral and social sciences for elimination, even though they're indispensable to understanding and improving Americans' health.
NEWS
By Patrick D. Hahn | March 28, 2013
Anyone who wants to know why health care costs continue to soar need look no further than the recent recommendation by the American Cancer Society that current and former heavy smokers discuss lung cancer screening with their doctors. The guidelines were based on the National Lung Screening Trial, which found that three spiral CT scans given over three years reduced lung cancer deaths by 20 percent. The New York Times called the finding "an enormous advance in cancer detection. " A 20 percent reduction in deaths sounds pretty good.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
In response to your editorial about programs in Baltimore's Oliver neighborhood, I would like to highlight the efforts of Baltimore HELPS (Healthy Eating Leading Partnerships for Seniors), an initiative being led by Medicare's Quality Improvement Organization in Maryland ("Fixing Oliver," March 13). As noted in the editorial, there is wide variation in life expectancy in the city. In fact, life expectancy in the Oliver neighborhood is approximately 20 years less than other areas in the city.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,Sun reporters | September 12, 2006
Baltimoreans face the lowest life expectancy of almost any jurisdiction in America, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. City residents can expect to live 68.6 years on average, the study found. That is worse than in all but a handful of counties in South Dakota that include impoverished Indian reservations, and there has been little improvement since a study published in 1997. Longevity in Baltimore is much lower than in affluent Montgomery County, where it was 81.3 years, eighth-highest in the nation and trailing seven Colorado counties only fractionally.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | March 17, 2005
Today's young Americans might be the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents because obesity will shave two to five years off the average life expectancy by 2050, a new study asserts. The pessimistic report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, challenges expectations about ever-increasing longevity and rebukes government demographers for not including the future toll of obesity in their calculations. Obesity already reduces life expectancy by four to nine months on average, and if trends continue it could take as great a toll as accidental deaths or cancer, the study concludes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Did you know that experts predict our children will be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents? You ask, why? Today, children drink more sugar-sweetened beverages than their parents, as children. Too much sugar in the diet, especially in liquid form, has been linked to development of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and many more diseases. Sugar-sweetened beverages supply half of the added sugar in the diets of 12-17-year-olds and one-third of the added sugar in diets of 2-5-year-olds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.