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By Kristy MacKaben, For the Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
It wasn't a great time for Anne Pence. The 56-year-old single mother from Baltimore had issues with past relationships, her house was damaged in a fire, she was unhappy with her job and was struggling to find answers for her daughter with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. "I was drowning. I knew I had to work on certain areas of my life that I desperately wanted to change," Pence says of that period three years ago. Pence began working with Terry Schaefer, 61, a Baltimore life coach.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 22, 2014
"Josh" is an attorney in the federal government who finds out from one of those dreaded staff surveys that the lawyers working for him aren't feeling the love. They don't think their hard work is appreciated, but he always lets them know when they screw up. The people working under him don't much like his management style. It's no surprise that Josh gets defensive and then disdainful. "Grown-up lawyers shouldn't expect to be thanked for just doing excellent work," he said. "They get paid, don't they?"
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NEWS
By Patricia Ward Biederman and Patricia Ward Biederman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2000
Five years ago, Bob Pranga's life was a mess. Unable to get his acting career off the ground, he was $60,000 in debt and working three jobs as a waiter, tour guide and department store clerk to keep afloat. Instead of turning to a therapist or a credit counseling agency to turn his life around, he hired Rick Tamlyn, a personal or life coach. They talked every week, with Pranga paying $50 a visit to sort out what was important to him and how to develop a plan for getting it. A year later, Pranga had paid off his debt and reinvented himself as Doctor Christmas, "tree stylist to the stars."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 4, 2014
Why did you do it?" The movie opens with that question. In response, Jayson Blair makes a joke. "This one again," he mutters, rolling his eyes in mock consternation at the predictability of it. But predictable as it is and as long as he's had to ponder it, Mr. Blair still ends up punting. "I don't have a good answer for the question," he acknowledges. "A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power and Jayson Blair at the New York Times" -- it premieres this week on PBS; check your local listings -- reintroduces us to the central figure in one of the great media scandals of all time, the one-time wunderkind who lied and plagiarized his way through a career on what is arguably the greatest stage in American journalism, The New York Times.
EXPLORE
July 30, 2012
Tracey Keyer is a life coach and public speaker and was the presenter at the July 21 BYA debutante workshop. Keyer's speach was "Embracing Your Journey. " BYA has a monthly workshop in Aberdeen.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 15, 2007
On the outside, Scott Baio looks like he has it all. Good looks, money, friends, a pretty blond girlfriend. On the inside, he's one screwed-up dude. And for viewers of VH1, that's going to make for a lot of fun in the coming weeks. Baio is the centerpiece in the reality show Scott Baio is 45 ... and Single, making its premiere tonight. It's an entertaining, emotional hour built around the one-time Hollywood hunk's quest to find out why he's still single. Oh, how we love to watch stars struggle!
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2006
In the old days, people who wanted advice about big decisions managed to make do with talking to parents, friends, ministers and maybe a shrink or two. Not so the baby boomers. They've discovered the value of mentors, job counselors, therapists of every ilk, nutritionists, personal trainers, party consultants, retirement planners, and now, life coaches. A life coach focuses on the future, rather than the past, helping clients find the best way to improve the quality of their work and lives by using the skills, character and creativity they already possess.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 25, 2013
Beverly Jones was my life coach before she was anybody else's life coach. Back at Ohio University, she was a young administrator and I was a reporter on the student newspaper, The Post. We were the rare woman in our jobs, and she talked me in off the ledge many times. Bev went on to Georgetown Law School and eventually worked as a lobbyist on Capital Hill. A golden parachute allowed her to re-invent herself as an executive coach, helping professionals figure out where they, like her, will be next.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 12, 2012
Many thanks to Ken Holt, the chief financial officer of Woofound , and Vince Talbert, the co-founder of Bill Me Later , for sharing their words of wisdom with the Baltimore Tech Parents meetup group on Tuesday night. Ken and Vince talked about the early part of their careers, Ken in wealth management and Vince in direct marketing. They both shared their experiences in working on a startup. Ken retired from a long career at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and jumped into a startup.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | June 17, 2006
Mamaroneck, N.Y.-- --The maturation of the world's greatest golfer has hit a curious wrinkle. For the first time in his career, it sure didn't feel like we were watching Tiger, part animal, part machine, all superhero. No, that was just Eldrick out there at the U.S. Open, hacking away and looking as naked and vulnerable as Superman with no tights. Yesterday we witnessed that scene from the comic book where the superhero's special powers wear thin, and he's forced to perform as a mere mortal.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 25, 2013
Beverly Jones was my life coach before she was anybody else's life coach. Back at Ohio University, she was a young administrator and I was a reporter on the student newspaper, The Post. We were the rare woman in our jobs, and she talked me in off the ledge many times. Bev went on to Georgetown Law School and eventually worked as a lobbyist on Capital Hill. A golden parachute allowed her to re-invent herself as an executive coach, helping professionals figure out where they, like her, will be next.
FEATURES
By Kristy MacKaben, For the Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
It wasn't a great time for Anne Pence. The 56-year-old single mother from Baltimore had issues with past relationships, her house was damaged in a fire, she was unhappy with her job and was struggling to find answers for her daughter with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. "I was drowning. I knew I had to work on certain areas of my life that I desperately wanted to change," Pence says of that period three years ago. Pence began working with Terry Schaefer, 61, a Baltimore life coach.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 18, 2013
There are so many violent tragedies every day - I'm thinking specifically about the deaths of young people, and particularly those by gun - it's impossible to process it all, much less give our hearts to it. If we tried, our heads would burst. I remember hearing Joe Ehrmann, the life coach and minister who once played football for the Baltimore Colts, say the nation suffers from an "empathy-deficit disorder. " He believes human beings need more than ever to be trained to be empathetic, perhaps because self-interest is so powerfully innate.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 12, 2012
Many thanks to Ken Holt, the chief financial officer of Woofound , and Vince Talbert, the co-founder of Bill Me Later , for sharing their words of wisdom with the Baltimore Tech Parents meetup group on Tuesday night. Ken and Vince talked about the early part of their careers, Ken in wealth management and Vince in direct marketing. They both shared their experiences in working on a startup. Ken retired from a long career at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and jumped into a startup.
EXPLORE
July 30, 2012
Tracey Keyer is a life coach and public speaker and was the presenter at the July 21 BYA debutante workshop. Keyer's speach was "Embracing Your Journey. " BYA has a monthly workshop in Aberdeen.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
As Maryland's training camp opened, coach Ralph Friedgen paced in the carpeted Gossett Football Team House auditorium in front of a white screen with black lettering. On the screen were Maryland's six goals for the season, which begins Monday against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium. The goals began with "Beat the next opponent," "Win a minimum of 7 games" and "Win the Atlantic Division," and proceeded right on through to "Win the ACC championship," "Win the bowl game" and "Finish in the Top 25. " "Don't let people talk down to you," Friedgen told his team, which was 2-10 last season.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
IT LOOKS TO ME LIKE RETIRING is a lot of hard work. That life transition is still a long way off for me -- I can't give up a job until my youngest finds one -- but I have been daydreaming about what it will be like to retire: Books, gardening, museums and galleries, travel, cooking, movies, friends. And, apparently, an MBA. The idea that employers will provide us with an income and health care for the rest of our lives is one that died out with our parents' generation. Corporate America wants out of the long-term care business, so more and more businesses are handing their employees a gold watch and a pillowcase full of money as they leave and saying, "Make it last."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 4, 2014
Why did you do it?" The movie opens with that question. In response, Jayson Blair makes a joke. "This one again," he mutters, rolling his eyes in mock consternation at the predictability of it. But predictable as it is and as long as he's had to ponder it, Mr. Blair still ends up punting. "I don't have a good answer for the question," he acknowledges. "A Fragile Trust: Plagiarism, Power and Jayson Blair at the New York Times" -- it premieres this week on PBS; check your local listings -- reintroduces us to the central figure in one of the great media scandals of all time, the one-time wunderkind who lied and plagiarized his way through a career on what is arguably the greatest stage in American journalism, The New York Times.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
COLLEGE PARK — As Maryland's training camp opened, coach Ralph Friedgen paced in the carpeted Gossett Football Team House auditorium in front of a white screen with black lettering. On the screen were Maryland's six goals for the season, which begins Monday against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium. The goals began with "Beat the next opponent," "Win a minimum of 7 games" and "Win the Atlantic Division" and proceeded right on through to "Win the ACC championship," "Win the bowl game" and "Finish in the Top 25. " "Don't let people talk down to you," Friedgen told his team, which was 2-10 last season.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2009
Salary: $45,000 Age: 55 Years on the job: Two How she got started: : After receiving a degree in addiction counseling, Chaney went to work at Park West Medical Center running a substance abuse program for HIV-positive clients. She later worked in the anti-smoking campaign for the Black Mental Health Alliance in partnership with the Baltimore City Health Department. She also taught in a nutrition program for addicts at the Baltimore City Detention Center. While working as a nutrition consultant with a personal trainer, she received a certificate in personal training and went on to take a part-time job at the Red Brook Health and Wellness Center.
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