Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLife And Work
IN THE NEWS

Life And Work

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
If you love hearing Martin Scorsese talk movies, don't miss "Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff. " Craig McCall's tip-top documentary centers on the cinematographer who turned Technicolor into an incomparably vivid and fluid palette with movies like "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman" and "The Barefoot Contessa. " (It plays at the AFI Silver at 2:45 p.m. Saturday and 8 p.m. Monday.) No one is more passionate than Scorsese at paying tribute to fellow artists like Cardiff and his most influential collaborators, the writing-directing-producing team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (aka "the Archers")
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Richard D. Pickens, owner of a Crofton interior design firm who lived in Union Square, where he served as president of the Friends of the H.L. Mencken House, died Tuesday of stomach cancer at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 50. "I was dumbfounded when I got the news about Richard's death. It was like a bolt out of the blue," said Harry R. Lord, a retired partner in the Baltimore law firm of Piper & Marbury. "Richard was really the lifeblood of the Mencken House for all these years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
Billy Baldwin, the noted Baltimore-born interior designer whose clients included Cole Porter, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Mike Nichols, Harvey Ladew, William S. Paley and Diana Vreeland, among many others of the jeweled glitterati, is reported to have once said that "good taste is the dullest thing in the world." "Modernism at Evergreen: Baltimore's Billy Baldwin," a recently opened exhibition at the Evergreen Museum & Library, recalls the career of the man that The New York Times described on his death in 1983 as the "dean of American interior decorators, whose taste and sense of elegance enabled him to become the greatest influence on a generation of post-World War II designers."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
If you love hearing Martin Scorsese talk movies, don't miss "Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff. " Craig McCall's tip-top documentary centers on the cinematographer who turned Technicolor into an incomparably vivid and fluid palette with movies like "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman" and "The Barefoot Contessa. " (It plays at the AFI Silver at 2:45 p.m. Saturday and 8 p.m. Monday.) No one is more passionate than Scorsese at paying tribute to fellow artists like Cardiff and his most influential collaborators, the writing-directing-producing team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (aka "the Archers")
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
On the stroke of midnight tomorrow a bagpipe procession will lead the way to the dark recesses of Westminster Cemetery and Catacombs to where the great poet and story teller Edgar Allan Poe is buried.There, Jeff Jerome, curator of the Poe House, will lift his glass at the site of Poe's grave in a traditional toast honoring the writer's 182nd birthday.This ceremony crowns the activities of the first day of the three day event, which begins at 8 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster Hall with the group, Musica Antiqua, playing some of Poe's favorite musical selections on authentic instruments from the author's time period.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
For 18 years, Beverly Dearing-Stuck has led tours at Maryland Shock Trauma Center designed to bring young drunken drivers face-to-face with the broken bones, lacerations and other consequences of their actions.But these days, the veteran nurse can't bring herself to participate in the tours, which she helped design.Not since July 6, when her personal and professional livescollided in twisted metal and blood, on a sunny stretch of rural Park Heights Avenue. The two-car crash left her father-in-law dead -- and police investigating the other driver, a young man cited for drunken driving.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
From: Linda Wheeler SparksSeverna Park JayceesLocal Jaycee chapters celebrate the 70-year history of the U.S. Jaycees organization the week of Jan. 20 to 26.The U.S. Jaycees group was founded by Henry Gissenbier of St. Louis in 1910 as a dance club to preserve traditional dances. By 1915, the organization began thinking about civic responsibilities, changing the group into what ithas become today. In 1985, the Jaycees included the membership of women, and in 1990, the U.S. Jaycees acknowledged the name of U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce, along with the Jaycees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 23, 2001
Since childhood, I've heard hundreds of attempts to answer the question "What is art?". The best answer for me is: Art's what changes people. Real art's defining purpose is to force sentient humans to reconsider their perceptions and the mechanisms by which they perceive. In whatever form art takes, its mission is to jolt the senses. For the last few days, my occasional refuge from the barbaric events of Sept. 11 has been to consider art's purpose, particularly in the context of the life of Andy Warhol.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2008
Alex Gibney's film on the abusive treatment of Iraqi and Afghan prisoners, Taxi to the Dark Side, won the Oscar for best documentary feature of 2007. His earlier film, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, was also nominated for an Oscar. He was in town over the weekend for the Maryland Film Festival showing his new film, Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson. We caught up with him. How do you manage to go from Enron to Guantanamo to Hunter Thompson? Is there a thread there that connects all of those?
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | February 6, 1992
In winter when the trees are bare Neil Harpe can see the Chesapeake Bay from his front window. From the room where he keeps his art supplies and his drawing table, he can look out and see the water behind black tree branches.The bay makes a backdrop for Harpe's life onceagain, as it did when he was growing up in Annapolis. But even though Harpe was away from the shore for more than 20 years, the bay continued to command his attention. Soon it took over his artwork, inspiring lithographs of skipjacks, oyster tongers, half-sunken sloops and bushels of crabs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
Billy Baldwin, the noted Baltimore-born interior designer whose clients included Cole Porter, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Mike Nichols, Harvey Ladew, William S. Paley and Diana Vreeland, among many others of the jeweled glitterati, is reported to have once said that "good taste is the dullest thing in the world." "Modernism at Evergreen: Baltimore's Billy Baldwin," a recently opened exhibition at the Evergreen Museum & Library, recalls the career of the man that The New York Times described on his death in 1983 as the "dean of American interior decorators, whose taste and sense of elegance enabled him to become the greatest influence on a generation of post-World War II designers."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2008
Alex Gibney's film on the abusive treatment of Iraqi and Afghan prisoners, Taxi to the Dark Side, won the Oscar for best documentary feature of 2007. His earlier film, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, was also nominated for an Oscar. He was in town over the weekend for the Maryland Film Festival showing his new film, Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson. We caught up with him. How do you manage to go from Enron to Guantanamo to Hunter Thompson? Is there a thread there that connects all of those?
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | June 23, 2007
When Scott Wheeler applied for a job at the Howard County Police Department, his mother told the agency's background investigator: "My son would give everything he has to his job." "How prophetic your words were," Police Chief William J. McMahon told Janet Wheeler yesterday at her son's funeral at Grace Community Church in Fulton. More than 1,000 people - about half of them members of the law enforcement community - attended yesterday's service for the first Howard County officer to die in the line of duty since 1961.
SPORTS
By ED SHERMAN and ED SHERMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 6, 2006
CHICAGO -- Dick Ebersol is back in his favorite chair. The NBC Sports chairman is huddled in Turin, Italy, getting ready for his network's marathon coverage of the Winter Olympics. This will be Ebersol's sixth Olympics at the controls for NBC and his ninth overall, dating to the days he served as a researcher for Roone Arledge at ABC. Ebersol, excited as always, can't wait. The Olympics are his passion. "They are the only reason why I still am doing this," Ebersol, 58, said during a December interview in Chicago.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
Edward Franklin Frazier, the Baltimore-born sociologist who had been chairman of the sociology department at Howard University and gained an international reputation as an authority on black life in the United States, seemed to fade into undeserved obscurity after his death in 1962. During his time, he was a powerful voice and the author of such seminal works as The Negro Family in the United States, Race and Culture Contacts in the Modern World, Negro Youth at the Crossways: Their Personality Development in the Middle States and Black Bourgeoisie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 23, 2001
Since childhood, I've heard hundreds of attempts to answer the question "What is art?". The best answer for me is: Art's what changes people. Real art's defining purpose is to force sentient humans to reconsider their perceptions and the mechanisms by which they perceive. In whatever form art takes, its mission is to jolt the senses. For the last few days, my occasional refuge from the barbaric events of Sept. 11 has been to consider art's purpose, particularly in the context of the life of Andy Warhol.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | June 23, 2007
When Scott Wheeler applied for a job at the Howard County Police Department, his mother told the agency's background investigator: "My son would give everything he has to his job." "How prophetic your words were," Police Chief William J. McMahon told Janet Wheeler yesterday at her son's funeral at Grace Community Church in Fulton. More than 1,000 people - about half of them members of the law enforcement community - attended yesterday's service for the first Howard County officer to die in the line of duty since 1961.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 17, 1991
Tommy Tune would see them in the lobbies of the old grand hotels of Europe, the aristocratic class caught short by the fast-forward of time, as faded as the furniture, as once-elegant and now-tattered as their surroundings."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
Strolling through an exhibit of her son's photographs, Margaret McGovern's blue eyes filled with tears when she was asked which one she would take home. She pointed out a picture of her son Mike kayaking in Alaska in August, the friendly expression on his bearded face framed against the seemingly serene backdrop of Blackstone Bay. Titled "Before the Storm," the image haunts her because Mike McGovern, an up-and-coming local photographer, was found drowned the next day in that bay, his cameras still around his neck.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2001
You don't have to admire "A Conversation with Gregory Peck," airing tonight as part of the acclaimed "American Masters" series on PBS. The 90-minute film is directed and produced by two-time Academy Award-winner Barbara Kopple ("Harlan County USA" and "American Dream"), and it's a pleasure to sit back and let such a gifted storyteller take you where she will with her camera. In this program, there's only Peck and Kopple's camera - no correspondent, no narrator, no production razzle-dazzle to come between you and the subject.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.