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NEWS
By Tiffany Latimore | February 15, 1996
This ain't no story of celebrationYou see, where I've been and what I've seenLittle Red Riding Hood never got to her grandmom's houseThe big bad man kidnapped herGoldilocks never got back homeShe got caught in a crossfireLittle Bo Peep never found her sheepShe took drugs and diedYou see, in my neighborhoodIt ain't no fairytaleTiffany Latimore is an eighth-grade student at Old Court Middle School.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelvin Sewell and Stephen Janis | July 20, 2011
T here is certainly no shortage of cop books. That's why when I decided to collaborate with Kelvin Sewell a former Baltimore city homicide detective, on “Why Do We Kill?” (out now) we decided to start the book with an underlying question that gets beyond the mere phenomena of violent crime and into the realm of why it occurs so regularly in Baltimore. The idea was to offer the reader more than a series of grisly tales. Instead we wanted to provide some context.
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NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 11, 2001
JUNIOR HARDEN, Scrammy Cager, Jack Merson, Inez Wheeler, Bladen Yates, Dorothy Baker, Mother Virginia Marshall, Doris Thompson... Definitely not names in the news. More like Citizens Anonymous. Very much like most of us, of course. They're living - and remembering - their lives in Ellicott City, Oella, Relay, Catonsville, Elkridge and other parts of Howard and nearby Baltimore County. And they're doing the remembering in ways that knit communities together. Most of them have been around for 75 years or more and they all have a story, a story of their own lives, surely, but one that outlines a larger narrative.
NEWS
November 9, 2008
EARLY LIFE BIRACIAL BACKGROUND: Barack Obama was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, on Aug. 4, 1961. His father, Barack Obama Sr., was a student from Kenya who herded goats as a child. His mother, Ann Dunham of Wichita, Kan., was a student at the University of Hawaii and the daughter of a furniture salesman, She married Obama Sr. unaware that he was already married to a woman in Kenya, with whom he had two children. Two years later, the couple divorced. TO INDONESIA: Dunham married an Indonesian student named Lolo Soetero, and in 1967, when Barack was 6, the family moved to Jakarta.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
IN "THE WONDER Years," Kevin Arnold, in voice-over, looks back on adolescence from the wry skepticism of middle age. In the new ABC series "My Life and Times," Ben Miller looks back on his life from the misty-eyed wisdom of 85 years of age. Both series seek the perspective that the passing of time brings without the distance that can accompany a period piece."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 24, 1991
"My Life and Times" is a gentle and charming new show that might help television break a couple of bad prime-time habits.There are a bunch of reasons to recommend the ABC series, which premieres at 9:30 tonight on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).There's the talent behind the camera, for one. "My Life andTimes" is created by Ron Koslow, the brains behind "Beauty and the Beast." It's directed by Michael Apted, who did such a lyrical job with the feature film, "Coal Miner's Daughter."Then there's the story itself.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson and Garland L. Thompson,Mr. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | March 15, 1992
MY LIFE AND TIMES.Verda F. Welcome, as told to James M. Abraham.Henry House Publishers, Englewood, N.J.308 pages. $19.95. The passing of someone like Verda Welcome would have left a huge gap in any community. She was a historic figure in Maryland's civil rights struggles, and an autobiography should be full of lessons about how it was when the fight was down and dirty -- and this one is.But there is more to writing a book than collecting and organizing the stories told by important people.
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 1992
PREACHER.Roger Bruns.W. W. Norton.351 pages. $22.95.Billy Sunday was the mold from which today's televangelists are cast.Half a century before Oral Roberts, Billy Graham and Jimmy Swaggart, Sunday put the fear of Jesus into millions of Middle Americans. In Sunday's heyday, radio and TV didn't exist, so he couldn't preach to the multitudes from the comfort of a broadcast studio. He had to constantly tour the hinterland bringing his fire-and-brimstone message to one town after another.There had been, of course, other revivalists before him, notes Sunday's biographer, Roger Bruns.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 15, 1991
"The Josephine Baker Story," which airs at 8 tomorrow night on HBO, is a lot like a photo album. It is a series of snapshots from the life of the black dancer and singer, who was born in 1906 in St. Louis and died in 1975 in Paris on the second night of a triumphant 50th anniversary comeback concert series.Some of the snapshots are arresting, some evocative. But they never manage to convey anything more than the surface or the flat, one-dimensional image. The real texture and deeper currents of her life and times are barely suggested.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
This week, The Sun celebrates the 100th anniversary of Babe Ruth's birth on Feb. 6. Today, a 14-page commemorative section looks at the life and times of America's greatest sports legend, the Baltimore-born boy who became baseball's first prolific home run hitter.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 11, 2007
BILL BRYSON, A HUMORIST and travel writer who has taken us on amusing journeys along the Appalachian Trail and across time and the cosmos, has turned his wit and his memory to growing up in the middle of the country, in the middle of the last century, in the middle of a delightfully dysfunctional family. The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir is the latest from the author of A Walk in the Woods and A Short History of Nearly Everything. He uses that same droll, jaundiced and deadpan voice -- this time, as a child -- to recall growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, in the 1950s, a time of benign neglect, when kids were put out of the house at 8 in the morning and told not to return until dinnertime unless they were "on fire or actively bleeding."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Across Jones Creek, the jagged, vaporous industrial landscape of the Sparrows Point steel works lies cool and calm and hazy blue-gray in the sharp winter sunlight. Mark Reutter looks out over the ice breaking up in the creek and talks about men who made steel there when the Bethlehem Steel mill was the biggest in the world. "Here you've got these blue-collared guys who are incredibly skilled and they need a Homer," he says. He laughs at his own hubris. He's no Homer, but he's making a nostalgic odyssey.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Renowned Annapolis photographer Marion E. Warren used to go to all lengths - and heights - to capture striking images of the Chesapeake Bay. He'd climb church steeples, mountains and bridges, to the top of a ferry terminal and out along spray-drenched sailboat bowsprits. Now 82 and ailing after bouts with two types of cancer, Warren - whose pictures over half a century have helped shape the region's collective image - is too weak to go out much with his camera and gear. Instead, he is working in retrospect, using digital technology to reprint his photographs of watermen, sailboats and buildings - and discovering long-hidden details as others discover him. "People say, `Don't you get tired of printing your same pictures over and over?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 13, 2002
For Which It Stands: An Anecdotal Biography of the American Flag, by Michael Corcoran (Simon & Schuster, 181 pages, $18). Corcoran, former top editor at Golf Illustrated and author of several books, principally about golf, has put together a charming, somewhat quirky, thoroughly readable narrative of the life and times, still very much ongoing, of Old Glory. His book draws in a great deal of history, brought together in a manner that is both solidly professional and breezy. In a post 9 / 11 season that has witnessed a greater proliferation of flag display than -- it must be assumed -- any time in U.S. history, this concise volume is a worthy entertainment and a nourishing source of patriotic lore.
FEATURES
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2001
It was the summer of 1960, a time of rebellion and chaos in Patrice Lumumba's African homeland. The flamboyant first prime minister of the Congo was heading to the United States to plead for help from a United Nations that he had previously denounced. But before he boarded the plane, he met with foreign journalists. A dispatch I wrote from Leopoldville, Congo, and carried in The Sun on July 23, 1960, offered this description of the ill-fated leader: "Chances are he will present to an American audience the picture of a moderate who is the much aggrieved victim of Belgian colonialism.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 11, 2001
JUNIOR HARDEN, Scrammy Cager, Jack Merson, Inez Wheeler, Bladen Yates, Dorothy Baker, Mother Virginia Marshall, Doris Thompson... Definitely not names in the news. More like Citizens Anonymous. Very much like most of us, of course. They're living - and remembering - their lives in Ellicott City, Oella, Relay, Catonsville, Elkridge and other parts of Howard and nearby Baltimore County. And they're doing the remembering in ways that knit communities together. Most of them have been around for 75 years or more and they all have a story, a story of their own lives, surely, but one that outlines a larger narrative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 13, 2002
For Which It Stands: An Anecdotal Biography of the American Flag, by Michael Corcoran (Simon & Schuster, 181 pages, $18). Corcoran, former top editor at Golf Illustrated and author of several books, principally about golf, has put together a charming, somewhat quirky, thoroughly readable narrative of the life and times, still very much ongoing, of Old Glory. His book draws in a great deal of history, brought together in a manner that is both solidly professional and breezy. In a post 9 / 11 season that has witnessed a greater proliferation of flag display than -- it must be assumed -- any time in U.S. history, this concise volume is a worthy entertainment and a nourishing source of patriotic lore.
SPORTS
By Lowell Cohn and Lowell Cohn,San Francisco Chronicle | November 3, 1991
An older, wiser Chris Mullin was sitting in front of his locker the other day at the Oakland Coliseum Arena, talking about his life and times.A few years ago, Chris Mullin wouldn't have entered into such a discussion, because he didn't know himself well, and what he knew he didn't necessarily like.He's engaged to be married, he was saying as he munched on a sandwich. He recently got engaged to a friend from St. John's named Liz, and he also bought a home in the San Francisco Bay Area. This perpetual New Yorker is putting down California roots.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 14, 2000
One of this year's sleeper hits - and deservedly so - is "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," Aviva Kempner's engrossing documentary about the trailblazing player who, as America's first Jewish baseball star, helped redefine sports, heroism and American culture while playing for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s and 1940s. Kempner's film has enjoyed successful runs at the Charles and Rotunda theaters; today it opens at the Loews Valley Centre in Owings Mills. This hasn't exactly been a boffo summer, especially for grown-up filmgoers - see "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg" for a pleasant respite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff | October 3, 1999
Has your biography aired on television yet? No? That's odd. Well, probably it will be on this season. Definitely no later than next season.Ridiculous, you say? There's hardly anything notable about little old you; nobody could possibly be interested in your story.If that's your view, you must not have cable. Surf the channels these days, and you can't help stumbling on a biography of somebody somewhere. At least a dozen cable networks broadcast biography shows, and more pop up all the time.
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