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Life And Death

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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 16, 1993
Cathy Leaycraft's photos of collages (which themselves are made from photos) deal with such large subjects as life and death and the nature of woman. But they do so with a slanted perspective and the kind of ambiguity that leaves open possibilities of interpretation and keeps the work interesting -- when it doesn't become so open that meaning drains away."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Michael Hersch composes music of sobering complexity -- lots of jagged melodic lines, thorny harmonies, quick-shifting rhythms. But even at its densest, his intense work communicates in a way that can make a listener feel privy to Hersch's innermost thoughts. The composer, who studied at the Peabody Institute in the 1990s and has been on the composition faculty there since 2006, is about to reveal even more of himself this week when his first work for the stage premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
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SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | December 19, 1993
Houston Oilers coach Jack Pardee and his offensive coordinator, Kevin Gilbride, know firsthand what it's like to deal with life-and-death issues.Both have overcome battles with cancer.Pardee was 27 and a player with the Los Angeles Rams when he discovered that a black mole on his back was malignant."At one time, I was told I might have two weeks to live. My first thought was, 'How am I going to live those two weeks?' All of us need to remember to treasure life because it's so fragile and none of us know how much we have left," he said.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Schmidt | October 24, 2013
Edward Feete was buried this past week. His was a simple service at a Falls Road funeral home, attended by dozens of his friends and remaining family. Eddie was 68, still youngish by today's standards for a long life. But Eddie was a big guy - a very tall, big-boned, heavy guy. His heart had had enough. Many of you in Towson and on the north side of Baltimore knew Eddie. For most of the twenty-four years before he retired in 2012, Eddie was a bagger at the Giant Food store in Ridgely Plaza.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 1998
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- Like everything else in this state, Christmas decorations are big. Just down the highway in Houston, a 64-display, drive-through light show is said to be the world's largest. Even in a small town like Lufkin to the northeast, an entire city block explodes in megawatt, wall-to-wall white lights.Here, the modest downtown gets into the spirit as well. A group of men spent a recent morning climbing up and down ladders to decorate the city's most distinctive building with gaily painted signs wishing all the happiest of holidays.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Del Quentin Wilber contributed to this article | April 26, 1998
The announcement over the Oakland Mills High School intercom pierced through the whispering voices and shuffling papers of Monday morning's first period: Two former students had died and one was critically injured on a spring break trip to Florida.Many had heard the news of the knife and baseball bat attack during the weekend. Friends had been calling each other. Parents had asked if they knew the men, Kevans Hall II, 23, Matthew Wichita, 21, and Seth Qubeck, 21.But the announcement brought the attack inside the walls of the school in this tight-knit community.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Jonathan Shapiro thought his first death-penalty case would be his last. The defense lawyer agreed to take the case of a convicted cop-killer shortly before the man was to be executed. Shapiro got the death sentence overturned and worked the case for the next eight years, for free, only to have his client executed anyway. "It basically drove me out of the practice of law," says Shapiro, who now represents convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad. "Just living through an execution is something you never forget.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- One expects tragedy to reveal itself in the face: to deepen its lines, twist the features. One expects it to appear somewhere, and there it is: It stares from the tired, joyless eyes of George McGovern.Except for those sad eyes he has not changed much. He is 73; he has aged well. He is tanned, his hair is light still and a little wispy. He smiles, friendly, only with his upper teeth. But that is enough to fish up the memory of Senator George McGovern's surprising, exuberant and quixotic quest for the presidency a quarter of a century ago when he carried the Democratic Party's standard against Richard Nixon.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Evening Sun Staff | January 12, 1991
The term "euthanasia" comes from the Greek words meaning "good death." But the concept of an easy death -- specifically, the means of inducing one -- has had a stormy relationship with the law.The case of Dr. Jack Kevorkian and his suicide machine is a good example. For several years, Dr. Kevorkian had been looking for customers for his device. Last June he found one in Janet Adkins, a 54-year-old Oregon woman who had been diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease.Janet Adkins' death in the back of Kevorkian's van in Oakland County, Mich.
NEWS
By JOAN D. McMAHON | December 22, 1992
Many quilting circles have their roots in the church or church-related activities. But recently I received a quizzical look from church members when I said that quilting is a spiritual endeavor.It helps us look at the way we learn about ourselves and our values. It connects us with others and the world around us. It is how we find meaning and purpose in life. Quilting explained a lot to me about the human spirit, our behaviors and our beliefs. In explaining the truths about quilting, I also discovered truths about being human.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
I wanted to thank you for the article, "Approaching birth, preparing for death" (July 28). I am the mother of two; one plus an angel, Lilly, who was born at 21 weeks gestation. The emotions that parents and their families have to deal with when faced with these types of situations are enormous, and that is putting it lightly. Thank you for building awareness that these circumstances exist and exist far more frequently then they are talked about. Lives are forever changed when an angel is born.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Though I hate how big and intrusive our government has become, I don't believe Edward Snowden was aware of the bigger picture when he leaked secret information about the National Security Agency's spying ("Source of NSA leaks named," June 10). He forgot that by leaking the information about the NSA's snooping on Americans, he also informed our enemies of its extent as well. One can't tell the American people about something without telling the rest of the world. Because of that, Mr. Snowden's narrow-mindedness should be considered selfish and traitorous.
NEWS
December 13, 2012
One has to wonder about the mental acuity of a judge having the power of life and death in his hands who bans a "Choose Life" vanity plate because there is no "Choose Death" vanity plate ("Judge: 'Choose Life' license plate unconstitutional," Dec. 12). Just when I am about to cancel my subscription to The Sun for lack of interest, it publishes something that makes me double over in laughter and cry in shame at the same time. God, what have we wrought? Gary Gamber, Reisterstown
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Stricken with grief and working on an hour of sleep, Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith played a major part in a comeback victory against the New England Patriots on Sunday night just hours after learning that his brother died in a motorcycle accident in Virginia. Smith was intent on honoring his 19-year-old brother, Tevin Jones, pointing to the sky after a 25-yard touchdown in the second quarter, and finishing with a team-high six receptions for 127 yards. Kneeling in the end zone, Smith said a prayer during the fourth quarter.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 8, 2012
Considering that the title character is no longer among the living in "Following Sarah," she spends a good deal of time on stage at Fells Point Corner Theatre. Playwright Rich Espey has set himself a tricky challenge with this Baltimore Playwrights Festival entry about a deceased high school girl who lingers in the thoughts of her classmates and perhaps lingers in a supernatural way, too. Espey, who is a veteran presence in this annual showcase for local playwrights, has a firm command of character and dialogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
I did not think I'd ever see a better medical documentary series than the Emmy-Award-winning “Hopkins 24/7” that aired in 2000 or its sequel, “Hopkins,” which won a Peabody Award in 2008. The backstage access, immediacy and range of gripping real-life drama that ABCNews Executive Producer Terence Wrong and his team captured at Baltimore's world-renowned medical institution were landmark. But with “NY Med,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Tuesday, Wrong surpasses his earlier work in terms of prime-time storytelling without sacrificing any of the cultural seriousness or grand reach of the Hopkins series.
NEWS
By Gloria A. Hoffner and Gloria A. Hoffner,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 12, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - The moment Kay Cyr's sleigh hit the concrete bench, she said, she felt her spiritual body being pulled up through darkness into an incredible umbrella of light. She said she sensed a powerful intelligence and an overwhelming feeling of peace and love from the light, in what she and fellow members of the Delaware Valley Near Death Studies group believe was a near-death experience. Fifty-seven years after the event, Cyr, now 64, said she clearly remembered looking down at her motionless body and hearing the light insist she go on living.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | December 8, 2006
Chilling doesn't begin to describe Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple, which uses archival footage and new interviews to chronicle events leading up to the horrible day in November 1978 when 909 people committed suicide in a Guyanese jungle at the behest of a charismatic madman named Jim Jones. But the film never gets behind the chill; it paints Jones' Peoples Temple as a utopian idea gone terribly wrong, but it never gets a handle on how things went so bad so quickly. What made people follow Jones so blindly?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
"A Matter of Life and Death" (1946) will make excellent post-Valentine's Day viewing at the Enoch Pratt Free Library 's central location Saturday. It's about love as the force that takes the full measure of a man or a woman, even during wartime. The movie starts when an RAF poet-pilot (David Niven), stuck in a plane blasted to ribbons, bails out without a parachute — and lives. The "conductor" meant to transport him to heaven loses him in dense English fog. A sensitive American (Kim Hunter)
NEWS
December 20, 2010
My only reaction in response to today's article about the protest at Café Hon ( "Demonstrators protest 'Hon' trademark," Dec. 20) is wondering where are these protestors and their outrage over real issues of life and death, such as standing up to child abuse, which ends over 2,500 lives a year? Where is their outrage over that? I respect their constitutional right to assemble, but get angry over something of real importance. You protestors are welcome to join us anytime you are ready to make your voices heard about keeping children safe.
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