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By Anna Quindlen | May 5, 1994
MY GREAT journalistic contribution to my family is that I write obituaries.First my mother's, 22 years ago, listing her accomplishments: two daughters, three sons. Then that of my father's second wife, dead of the same disease that killed his first one.Last week it was my sister-in-law. Sherry Quindlen, 41," I tapped out on the keyboard, and then it was real, like a last breath."When you write about me," she said one day in the hospital, "be nice."For the obit I could only be accurate.The limitations of the form eliminate the more subjective truths: a good heart, a generous soul, who made her living taking care of other people's children.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 26, 2007
Most baby boomers believe in life after death, a recent survey shows, and the closer they get to the finish line, the more certain they are a reward is waiting. In a survey in the latest issue of AARP The Magazine, 73 percent of those 50 and older agreed with the statement "I believe in life after death," and two-thirds of them say their confidence in the afterlife has increased as they've gotten older. More women (80 percent) than men (64 percent) believe in an afterlife, possibly because they are convinced they earned their spot during this life.
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NEWS
April 3, 1991
A story in the March 27 issue of the Carroll County Sun, headlined "Holy Week, Easter celebrate life after death," contained the following statement:"Judas, one of his followers, betrayed Jesus that evening to the Jewish leaders who considered him a threat to their power. He was crucified the next day, which is celebrated as Good Friday."The Gospel texts state that the crucifixion itself was carried out by the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate. Biblical scholar Eugene J. Fisher writes, "The arrest of Jesus . . . was done covertly and at night precisely because of his popularity with the (Jewish)
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Nicole Fuller and Sun Reporters | December 31, 2006
They are constantly reminded. The bold headlines in the newspapers. The fuzzy images on television. All bearing news of yet another casualty, another American soldier fallen in Iraq. More than 3 1/2 years have passed, 3 1/2 years since the war in Iraq began, claiming nearly 3,000 American lives and leaving behind spouses, bereaved mothers and fathers, and children too young to understand. About 60 U.S. servicemen and -women with ties to Maryland have died. Young and old, black and white, men and women.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 25, 1997
Like many rap records these days, the new Notorious B.I.G. album, "Life After Death" (Bad Boy 73011, arriving in stores today), begins with a bit of theater. It's a variation on a scenario rap fans have heard many times before, with an increasingly agitated man trying to head off an altercation.It ends, as these things invariably do, with the dull crack of gunfire. "Hey, yo, Big!" cries the rapper's anguished companion as ambulance sirens wail. Cut to an intensive-care unit, where Biggie's buddy pleads as a monitor beeps ominously.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
For three weeks, members of a Pasadena church have fasted and prayed that a drama they are presenting this weekend will scare people out of hell.Last year's production of "Heaven's Gates, Hell's Flames," a series of vignettes of people confronting life after death, prompted some 150 people to convert to Christianity, members of the Assembly of God church say."Last year we had an amazing response," said the minister, the Rev. Philip Foster. "People who had attended church for years realized their lives weren't where they should have been.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 18, 1993
CHICAGO -- A survey of 13 predominantly Judeo-Christian countries shows substantial majorities in most of them believe in God and in life after death, refuting perceptions of social scientists that society isn't as religious as it used to be."It is too early to write an obituary notice for religion," said Rev. Andrew Greeley, Roman Catholic priest-sociologist-author and a coordinator of the study released yesterday by the International Social Survey Program. "God didn't die, not even under socialism."
NEWS
March 17, 1997
THE SLAYING of Christopher Wallace, the rap music star known as Biggie Smalls or the Notorious B.I.G., has record stores everywhere increasing orders for his new album. Mr. Wallace was killed by a drive-by gunman a week ago in Los Angeles. Given the similarity of his death to his song lyrics, it is expected that the new CD with the eerily prescient title, "Life after death," will eclipse his 1994 million-seller, "Ready to die."And that is the shame of it. Even as rap music fans lament the death of Mr. Wallace and plead for the violence associated with "gangsta rap" to end, it is clear that his death will, for a time, reinvigorate the genre's popularity.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | August 26, 2007
Most baby boomers believe in life after death, a recent survey shows, and the closer they get to the finish line, the more certain they are a reward is waiting. In a survey in the latest issue of AARP The Magazine, 73 percent of those 50 and older agreed with the statement "I believe in life after death," and two-thirds of them say their confidence in the afterlife has increased as they've gotten older. More women (80 percent) than men (64 percent) believe in an afterlife, possibly because they are convinced they earned their spot during this life.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2004
There's religious immortality and there's the more mundane kind Ronn Wade provides. He can give you shelf life after death. "This is a real human heart," says Wade as he reaches into a plastic bag and removes what looks like a pinkish-gray conch. "It's biostatically stable. You can hold it in your hands." With that, the heart gets passed around the room. Carefully. As if it's made of Waterford crystal. This is the kind of heart nobody wants to be responsible for breaking. Wade - longtime director of both the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's State Anatomy Board and the Anatomical Services Division of the University of Maryland Medical School, all of which means he secures and distributes research cadavers - has been invited to address a small group of nurses and administrative staff at St. Joseph Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2004
Best Sellers National best sellers from data gathered and reported by Publishers Weekly. The number in parentheses indicates last week's position and may be greater than 10 as PW lists the top 15. Fiction Weeks on list 1. (1) Trace, Patricia Cornwell 2 2. (2) The DaVinci Code, Dan Brown 78 3. (-) Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Sidney Sheldon 1 4. (3) Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, Susanna Clarke 3 5. (4) The Five People You Meet in Heaven, Mitch Albom 51 6. (5) The Rule of Four, Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason 19 7. (6)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
"The Madonna of the Future: Essays in a Pluralistic Art World," by Arthur C. Danto. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 450 pages. $32. In the era after the end of art history, writes Arthur C. Danto, art can look like anything and be made out of anything so long as it is "about" something and provided it embodies the meaning of what it is about. This is the stunningly simple hypothesis of "The Madonna of the Future," the latest volume of essays by Danto, art critic of the Nation magazine and possibly the most penetrating writer on contemporary art today.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
For James Van Praagh, rising to the top of the best-seller list was simply a matter of talking to some friends.Of course, it wouldn't have worked if his friends had been alive.Using a talent that he says became apparent after the glowing hand of God appeared to him as an 8-year-old, Van Praagh, 39, has spent the better part of his adult life as a conduit to the dead -- the real-life equivalent of the Whoopi Goldberg character in "Ghost." His book about those conversations, "Talking to Heaven" (Dutton, $22.95)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 25, 1997
Like many rap records these days, the new Notorious B.I.G. album, "Life After Death" (Bad Boy 73011, arriving in stores today), begins with a bit of theater. It's a variation on a scenario rap fans have heard many times before, with an increasingly agitated man trying to head off an altercation.It ends, as these things invariably do, with the dull crack of gunfire. "Hey, yo, Big!" cries the rapper's anguished companion as ambulance sirens wail. Cut to an intensive-care unit, where Biggie's buddy pleads as a monitor beeps ominously.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- She reposes in a refrigerated glass cube set off in a darkened corner of the National Geographic Society's headquarters here. She is history personified, a being from the past abruptly removed from her mountain tomb.Her hair is long and black and luxuriant; it falls down and away from her oval face. Her skin is faintly olive in color, with the pink windburn on the cheeks typical of the people of the sierra. Her arms are sinewy. Her graceful throat is dusted with frost. Her lower body is wrapped in alpaca wool, of red and faded ocher.
NEWS
March 17, 1997
THE SLAYING of Christopher Wallace, the rap music star known as Biggie Smalls or the Notorious B.I.G., has record stores everywhere increasing orders for his new album. Mr. Wallace was killed by a drive-by gunman a week ago in Los Angeles. Given the similarity of his death to his song lyrics, it is expected that the new CD with the eerily prescient title, "Life after death," will eclipse his 1994 million-seller, "Ready to die."And that is the shame of it. Even as rap music fans lament the death of Mr. Wallace and plead for the violence associated with "gangsta rap" to end, it is clear that his death will, for a time, reinvigorate the genre's popularity.
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