Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLife
IN THE NEWS

Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber Mike Littwin of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | December 16, 1990
It's called The Box, a sweltering, dimly lit gymnasium with a hard-court floor smudged dark brown, two half-moon-shaped backboards and four brick walls.This is where David Wingate began a basketball journey, reaching each step on a path that stretched from the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center in East Baltimore, to Dunbar High School, to Georgetown University, to the National Basketball Association.In September, Wingate was on the verge of securing his financial future, coming within 48 hours of signing a three-year,$2.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Hello. My name is Tim. And I'm an "I Love Lucy"-holic. Think less of me, if you must. It won't bother me. I have no intention of ever being cured, even if it means lifelong membership in The Friends of the Friendless (a "Lucy" reference, of course). It all started when I was a little boy (sorry, another "Lucy" reference). I discovered the greatest sitcom ever made - please, "Seinfeld" fans, do not even try - and that was that. Thanks to omnipresent reruns on Channel 5 in Washington, I would catch the show after school, after dinner, whenever.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Susan Ager | August 22, 1999
What do you need to make your life look better? Will a dime do? Psychologist Norbert Schwarz, at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research, says mere moods often determine our overall satisfaction with our lives. And, he says, "Very minimal things can temporarily put you in a good mood," and thus brighten everything else.In a classic study at a German university, Schwarz in the course of a day occasionally placed a coin equivalent to a dime on a copy machine for the next user to find.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 9, 2014
One of the things I like about baseball - and there are a lot of things to like, especially when the Orioles reach the American League Championship Series - is the way it marks time. You don't have to be a stats freak to remember the milestones. When your team is alive in October, the year of that happy development registers forever. In the Barry Levinson-directed film adaptation of Bernard Malamud's "The Natural," the fictional slugger Roy Hobbs shatters the glass clock in center field with a line-drive home run. That is to say: Baseball will never be ruled by time.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 24, 2013
Really? Bobbie Smith, too? Geez. This is what I'm thinking when word comes that the lead singer of the Spinners has died. It comes a month after Richard Street and Damon Harris, who sang on "Papa Was a Rolling Stone" with the Temptations, passed away just days apart. Now Mr. Smith, whose ice cream dollop of a tenor on "Could It Be I'm Falling in Love" serenaded me through junior year in high school, has joined them. It feels -- and this feeling has become uncomfortably familiar lately -- as if Somebody Up There is taking a sledgehammer to my childhood.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
Baltimore struggles to overcome homicides, and gun violence. The horrific death of Stephen Pitcairn, brilliant Hopkins student, with a knife to his chest ("A promising life is cut short," July 27), is an open wound in the heart of Baltimore. How many young lives cut short by brutal violence will it take before we, as citizens, parents, grandparents, city and state leaders, begin to teach the ethics that life is sacred, that violence to one is a reflection on us all? Theresa Reuter, Catonsville
NEWS
January 25, 2010
As I marched up Constitution Avenue last Friday, I felt small among the crowd, the banners and the signs, yet united with my fellow man, we were massive. We came from parishes, communities, colleges and high schools from all over the United States. We were all ages, every race, many religions, or unaffiliated. When the road began to rise toward Capitol Hill, I looked ahead and saw people as far as the eye could see, and I looked back to find more people as far as the eye could see. We were marching for all life -- unborn, elderly, disenfranchised or infirm -- not just those who can voice a choice.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
I am almost 80 years old. My husband and I have owned Macs from the very first one. It is my life line. I email back and forth with friends and family, search the Web for all kinds of information and keep up with what is happening locally, nationally and internationally through my Mac. Steve Jobs changed my life, and I appreciate all that he did. Pat Elliott, Baltimore
NEWS
March 3, 2010
My brother and I graduated Cardinal Gibbons in the late '70s. This place changed my life. I had no idea of it's financial problems. Gibbons has always been a bright spot during troubled times in the city school system. They were personally interested in the individual student. The all-male student body and dress code made for a unique environment and reduced the daily distraction that high school kids deal with today. What a shame. Conrad Johnson
NEWS
October 9, 2013
I was appalled to learn that Baltimore City showed such a lack of compassion to the family of Angel Chiwengo ("Family and friends gather for funeral of woman killed in police crash," Oct. 5). No representative from the city bothered to show up at Ms. Chiwengo's funeral. And despite her absence, Mayor Rawlings-Blake was kind enough to interrupt her busy schedule and email The Sun about the tragic loss of life that occurred. The mayor's perfunctory email and failure to appear at the funeral remind us how little our lives and safety matter to those in power.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
In the opening episode of Season 4 of “Homeland,” Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes), CIA station chief in Kabul, is sitting in a rec center within the U.S. compound drinking a beer and watching baseball on TV, when a young Air Force pilot approaches. After an exchange that establishes Carrie as the person who called in the airstrike he flew on the home of a suspected terrorist, the lieutenant says, “Monsters.” “What did you say?” Mathison angrily demands of the young man she had previously been sizing up sexually.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Yoga enthusiast Riley Porter has sharpened his tree pose taking classes at Ellicott City's Gogo Guru Yoga Studio & Store. Riley is 8 years old. His mom, Jeni Porter, says her son's interest in yoga began when he was 5.  “He heard that all football players and baseball players also study yoga. He thought it was cool,” says Porter, who took yoga while she was pregnant with Riley. “There's a lot of movements [in yoga] that are similar to shooting a basketball.” Kids' yoga classes are just one example of the niche offerings Howard County studios are developing in an effort to expand their appeal to a wider audience.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
I am all for the feral cats Let it be noted that I am not talking at all about the feral cat in the school, however ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). I do know that the American Bird Conservancy bitterly despises all feral cats and would willingly kill them all. The Department of Natural Resources in Maryland is also very antiquated in their concepts about these cats and would also kill them. I have worked with feral cats and kittens - rescuing them, getting them medical checkups, needed shots and gradually turning them into some of the kindest and most loving animals that I have ever known.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | November 23, 2012
This holiday season may be the greatest ever for book adaptations, and this week, we have a visual stunner: "Life of Pi," Ang Lee's take on the best-selling Yann Martel novel . Among the other big adaptations is "Lincoln," the Steven Spielberg movie that was inspired by Doris Kearns Goodwin's "Team of Rivals," and that has already become an Academy Award favorite.  The season's bounty also includes "The Hobbit," "Les Miserables"...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
People are always bursting Casey Carle's bubbles. And he couldn't be happier. "I'm glad the bubbles burst," says Carle, an acclaimed bubbleologist (perhaps the only bubbleologist) and comic performer who will be the main attraction at this weekend's Bubble Days at the Maryland Science Center . "If they didn't, I'd have to actually have a much bigger house to put all my creations in. It would be a huge challenge. " Perhaps not as challenging, however, as the stuff he does during his act — stuff that involves making that most ephemeral of creations, soap bubbles, do all manner of tricks.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A biography of former Baltimore banker Ed Hale is set to detail his rise from a Sparrows Point upbringing to exploits in real estate, sports business and banking - working covertly for the CIA and surviving plane crashes along the way. Apprentice House, a student-run book publisher at Loyola University Maryland, is releasing "Hale Storm," by former Baltimore Sun columnist Kevin Cowherd , on Nov. 1. A preview of the book suggests Hale's story...
NEWS
September 22, 2014
It is during times of crisis that we see the very "best" in our fellow Americans. First responders and other heroic professionals routinely surprise us with tremendous and often unexpected acts. The University of Maryland Shore Regional Health System represents an often overlooked group of medical professionals who perform such acts every day. My father recently suffered a massive stroke and was admitted to Shore Regional Health's Easton facility. We do not yet know whether he will survive, but we are certain he could receive no finer care.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.