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Lieutenant Colonel

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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1996
A high-ranking Maryland State Police official has been named the agency's first female lieutenant colonel -- a rank that puts her among the top four state police commanders, officials said.Maj. Cynthia R. Smith, 37, commander of the three barracks in Western Maryland, will begin her duties as head of the Administrative Services Bureau at state police headquarters Jan. replacing retiring Lt. Col. Charles R. Mazzone."My career ambition has been to do the best I can in every job I get," said Smith, a Grantsville resident.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Odis Lee Sistrunk Jr., a retired Baltimore police lieutenant colonel known as the "Big O," died of undetermined causes May 19 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 65. Born in Steubenville, Ohio, he was the son of Odis Lee Sistrunk Sr., a steelworker, and Winnie Mae Sistrunk, a homemaker. He was a 1968 graduate of Steubenville High School, where he played on the basketball team. He joined the Job Corps in New York and responded to an ad that said Baltimore was recruiting police cadets.
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NEWS
January 17, 2004
Anthony M. Solberg, a retired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, died of cancer Jan. 10 at his home in Bel Air. He was 68. A native of La Crosse, Wis., he graduated in 1957 from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and shortly after married his high school sweetheart, Carol Vondrashek. During his 23-year military career, he served at West Point and the War College, as well as in Germany, Vietnam and Iran. He retired in 1980, while stationed at Aberdeen Proving Ground. He continued his ties to the military as vice president of Dynamic Science Inc. in Aberdeen, a contractor for Army bases.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
I would like to thank Randall Leonard for his May 28 commentary, "Punishing honesty at the Naval Academy. " Ethics is a subject not to be taken lightly, especially for those who hold coalition, enemy, and civilian lives in the balance. There is, however, a big difference between a mistake and a crime. Per Webster's II New Riverside University Dictionary, as a noun a mistake is "1. An error: fault. 2. A misconception: misunderstanding. " The same defines a crime as "1. An act committed or omitted in violation of law forbidding or commanding it and for which punishment is imposed upon conviction.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
Truman E. "Ted" Deyo, former Severn School business manager and retired career Army officer, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Austin, Texas. He was 87. Mr. Deyo was born in Dunkirk, Ind., and raised in Fort Washington in Prince George's County. After graduating from Oxon Hill High School in 1933, he enlisted in the Army and later entered West Point, graduating in 1941. During World War II, he was assigned to the 1st Army staff at Clifton College in Bristol, England, where plans for the invasion of Europe were developed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
James A. Jones, a retired Maryland State Police lieutenant colonel who was an early advocate of alcohol and drug testing to reduce highway accidents, died of an embolism Dec. 19 at his Perry Hall home. He was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea, he was a 1948 Calvert Hall College High School graduate. He joined the Navy and became an aviation electrician aboard an aircraft carrier. Among other decorations, he received the Korean Service Medal with two battle stars. He joined the Maryland State Police in 1957 and was stationed at Waldorf, Upper Marlboro, Bel Air and Golden Ring, before moving on to the state police headquarters in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
Johnny Potocki is out of his element at Southwestern High School.The retired Army lieutenant colonel cannot order anyone to do anything, cannot hold up a single-minded goal and expect everyone to follow. He can only ask and hope his students respond.But after 30 years in the Army, this is where he wants to be."It's the greatest feeling in the world to stand up and see them grasp what you're teaching," said Mr. Potocki, 53. "I used to run and I get a running high when my endorphins kick in. It's the same thing" with teaching.
NEWS
January 30, 2004
John Samuel Revelle, a retired insurance salesman and Army National Guard lieutenant colonel, died of congestive heart failure Jan. 23 at Maryland General Hospital. The Bolton Hill resident was 86. Mr. Revelle's mother died during childbirth at Crisfield's old Marine Hospital, and he was raised by the hospital's head nurse, Florence S. Smith, in Crisfield and Salisbury. She arranged for a scholarship enabling Mr. Revelle to attend McDonogh School, where he was a 1937 graduate. He remained active in alumni affairs, and his son and two grandchildren also became graduates of the school.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2004
The acting superintendent of the Maryland State Police has replaced two of his predecessor's top commanders as part of his first round of promotions since taking over the agency, officials said yesterday. Col. Thomas E. "Tim" Hutchins promoted two majors to the rank of lieutenant colonel in charge of the department's operations and administrative bureaus. He also replaced his chief of staff. Lt. Col. Edwin Lashley, a 27-year state police veteran, replaces Lt. Col. Mark S. Chaney as commander of the operations bureau, which includes patrol divisions and special operations sections.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Six gay and lesbian members of the military began a constitutional challenge yesterday to the new federal law and Pentagon rules that together will force most homosexuals out of the services.In a lawsuit filed in federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y., three officers -- including a female lieutenant colonel who is the commander of an Army Reserve battalion -- and three enlisted men attacked the so-called "don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" policy that emerged in a compromise between the Clinton administration and Congress.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Saul Sitzer, who owned a popular Parkville restaurant and was a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel who flew numerous combat missions over Germany in World War II, died of stroke complications Sunday at the Loch Raven Veterans Affairs Hospital. He was 86 and lived in Perry Hall. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in the Canarsie section, he was the son of a Polish-born grocer. He was a 1942 graduate of Samuel J. Tilden High School. He attended Brooklyn College and enlisted in what was then the Army Air Corps.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 22, 2010
Dr. Albert Shapiro, a retired Baltimore dermatologist and a former longtime Pikesville resident, died March 12 in his sleep at the Noreen McKeen Residences in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 96. Dr. Shapiro, the son of a businessman and a homemaker, was born in Somerville, Mass., and spent his early years in nearby Chelsea. In 1921 he moved with his family to Baltimore, where he graduated from City College in 1931. He graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1937 and completed postgraduate training in dermatology at New York University's Skin and Cancer College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 23, 2010
James Henry Kehoe Jr., who during his more than three-decade career at the University of Maryland, College Park produced many team championships as a track-and-field coach and succeeded in lifting Maryland from athletic mediocrity during his tenure as athletic director, died of heart failure Sunday at Burnett-Calvert Hospice in Prince Frederick. The longtime Chesapeake Beach resident was 91. Mr. Kehoe, the son of a Harford County Standard Oil Co. oil distributor and a homemaker, was born and raised in Bel Air. He graduated from Bel Air High School in 1936, where he was a state champion half-miler.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 9, 2009
Col. Louis Beck, a retired career Army intelligence officer who served in three wars, died of liver failure Aug. 2 at the Veteran Administration's Extended Care and Rehabilitation Center in Northeast Baltimore. He was 90 and had lived in Northwest Baltimore. Colonel Beck, the son of parents from Lithuania and Belarus, was born and raised in Hartford, Conn., where he attended Hartford High School. In 1943, he was inducted into the Army, where he earned his General Educational Development diploma.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
James A. Jones, a retired Maryland State Police lieutenant colonel who was an early advocate of alcohol and drug testing to reduce highway accidents, died of an embolism Dec. 19 at his Perry Hall home. He was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea, he was a 1948 Calvert Hall College High School graduate. He joined the Navy and became an aviation electrician aboard an aircraft carrier. Among other decorations, he received the Korean Service Medal with two battle stars. He joined the Maryland State Police in 1957 and was stationed at Waldorf, Upper Marlboro, Bel Air and Golden Ring, before moving on to the state police headquarters in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
Vietnam veteran Gerald W. Elliott had waited 40 years for this moment, and he wasn't about to let Tropical Storm Hanna keep him away from the military ceremony at which he was to be decorated with two Purple Hearts. Elliott, 61, a Salisbury resident, accompanied by his wife of 39 years, a daughter and a granddaughter, arrived shortly before the 11 a.m. ceremony yesterday at the Marine Corps Reserve Center in Northeast Baltimore. Originally scheduled outdoors, it was moved because of the foul weather to a large gymnasium that was filled with Marines, some 50 of whom were in military formation.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | June 1, 1994
Continuing his top-to-bottom reorganization of the Baltimore Police Department, Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier announced today that he is abolishing the positions of the department's three deputy commissioners.The commissioner also said the department eventually would be abolishing two other ranks through attrition -- those of lieutenant colonel and captain. The department has one lieutenant colonel and 12 captains.Mr. Frazier told a morning news conference that the moves are needed to improve efficiency and communication in the department.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun Reporter | November 26, 2006
In a room lined with empty bookcases, Prince George's County Del. Anthony G. Brown sits at the head of a long wooden table, surrounded by most of the 44 people who have just signed on to Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley's transition team. He urges members to introduce themselves, to share a bit about their backgrounds. But when the first few are long-winded, Brown, an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel, politely tells them to shorten it up. He advises a simple change of direction: Name and organization, he says, would do just fine.
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