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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -- The Liechtenstein mouse is roaring, and the squeak is irritating Czechoslovakian ears.The principality of Liechtenstein, a country so small it's often missing from maps of Europe, has no army, no heavy weapons, no airport, no jail and not very many taxes.But now, the prince of Liechtenstein snipes at Czechoslovakia from his tiny Alpine redoubt in a dispute that recalls Peter Sellers' classic film comedy "The Mouse That Roared." Mr. Sellers, as late-show aficionados all know, plays the leader of the Grand Duchy of Fenwick, who declares war on the United States so that his country can lose and get rich on U.S. foreign aid.His Serene Highness Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein doesn't need any help in getting rich.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2000
PARIS - Author W. Somerset Maugham once described Monaco as "a sunny spot for shady people." Last week, the French Parliament offered a few more details. In a scathing 400-page report, the Parliament said that the tiny principality - a famous refuge for wealthy tax dodgers - is an ideal place to launder money. It accused Monaco of having deliberately put into effect lax banking laws - including a guarantee of anonymity - to attract wealthy depositors. And it said that the monetary surveillance systems are so poor that even if Monaco officials wanted to cooperate in international efforts to prevent money laundering, they could not. "Monaco is one of the most hypocritical territories when it comes to the fight against money laundering," said Arnaud Montebourg, one of the Socialist members of Parliament who helped to write the report.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1996
VADUZ, Liechtenstein -- With the snow-capped Alps as the backdrop and the misty Rhine River as the stage, Swiss police waited in vain yesterday afternoon at the next scheduled stop on the long, gilded trail of Martin Bramson.With the help of the Swiss, the U.S. government had hoped to finally get its hands on Bramson, 51, who is believed to have stolen up to $20 million by selling bogus malpractice insurance to doctors via a family-run scheme in Columbia, Md.Bramson's father and brother are in jail for their roles in the scheme, and yesterday Bramson was to have been arrested by the Swiss as he crossed into the country from Liechtenstein.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1997
Globe-trotting con man Martin Bramson, the mastermind in one of America's largest insurance fraud schemes, pleaded guilty yesterday to swindling more than $12 million from thousands of doctors and laundering the money in 588 banks around the world.The guilty plea ends one phase of the case against Bramson, a Maryland fugitive who was chased throughout Europe, Mexico and the Caribbean by Interpol before being tracked down in the tiny principality of Liechtenstein. But the hunt continues for millions more that he may have stashed in foreign bank accounts.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
VADUZ, Liechtenstein -- Suspected swindler Martin Bramson remained in international limbo yesterday, locked in a Liechtenstein prison and awaiting the next move by U.S. authorities looking to bring him home to Maryland.The Liechtenstein government, which has frustrated U.S. justice officials by refusing to extradite Bramson since his arrest in the tiny European nation 21 months ago, wouldn't speak about the case yesterday and seemed to be getting frustrated.Government officials had tried to send Bramson to Swiss authorities Friday in a secret transfer at a bridge on the Rhine River, but the mission was canceled after Bramson claimed he couldn't walk out of his cell, authorities said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Martin Bramson -- international fugitive, alleged confidence man and multimillionaire crook -- sits today in a prison cell in the tiny European nation of Liechtenstein, where it would seem at first glance that his luck has finally run out.But a 1936 extradition treaty between Liechtenstein and the United States may have a loophole and give Mr. Bramson his freedom again: It seems to have no provision for white-collar crime."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
Suspected Maryland con man Martin Bramson has lost his first legal bid to be freed from a Liechtenstein prison, but he is still fighting to block his extradition and to keep more than $3 million seized when he was arrested.A Liechtenstein judge denied Mr. Bramson's appeal for release, saying that one of the white-collar crimes he is accused of seems to be covered by the nation's extradition treaty. A formal extradition hearing is pending, but the judge's move could pave the way for Mr. Bramson's return to face charges in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
ZURICH, Switzerland -- Kicked out of a Liechtenstein prison after 21 months and shorn of more than $3 million, international fugitive Martin Bramson has been thrust into a Swiss prison, awaiting yet another extradition attempt by frustrated U.S. authorities.The suspected multimillion-dollar con man from Maryland was jailed in Switzerland last night, having been secretly moved there overnight from the tiny nation of Liechtenstein.While the government ruled by Prince Hans-Adam II finally expelled Bramson from Liechtenstein, it refused to extradite him to the United States, saying it feared "inhuman and degrading punishment" by U.S. prosecutors.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
Martin Bramson, the suspected multimillion-dollar con man who led U.S. authorities on a worldwide chase and spent the past 2 1/2 years in European prisons fighting extradition, is being flown back to the United States today, federal agents said.Bramson, jailed since last fall in a small Alpine village in Switzerland, lost his final appeal to the Swiss Supreme Court on July 16 and must face trial in Baltimore for masterminding one of America's largest insurance fraud schemes. Up to $20 million was swindled from doctors and hidden in more than 600 bank accounts around the world, court papers said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1997
Globe-trotting con man Martin Bramson, the mastermind in one of America's largest insurance fraud schemes, pleaded guilty yesterday to swindling more than $12 million from thousands of doctors and laundering the money in 588 banks around the world.The guilty plea ends one phase of the case against Bramson, a Maryland fugitive who was chased throughout Europe, Mexico and the Caribbean by Interpol before being tracked down in the tiny principality of Liechtenstein. But the hunt continues for millions more that he may have stashed in foreign bank accounts.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
Martin Bramson, the suspected multimillion-dollar con man who led U.S. authorities on a worldwide chase and spent the past 2 1/2 years in European prisons fighting extradition, is being flown back to the United States today, federal agents said.Bramson, jailed since last fall in a small Alpine village in Switzerland, lost his final appeal to the Swiss Supreme Court on July 16 and must face trial in Baltimore for masterminding one of America's largest insurance fraud schemes. Up to $20 million was swindled from doctors and hidden in more than 600 bank accounts around the world, court papers said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
ZURICH, Switzerland -- Kicked out of a Liechtenstein prison after 21 months and shorn of more than $3 million, international fugitive Martin Bramson has been thrust into a Swiss prison, awaiting yet another extradition attempt by frustrated U.S. authorities.The suspected multimillion-dollar con man from Maryland was jailed in Switzerland last night, having been secretly moved there overnight from the tiny nation of Liechtenstein.While the government ruled by Prince Hans-Adam II finally expelled Bramson from Liechtenstein, it refused to extradite him to the United States, saying it feared "inhuman and degrading punishment" by U.S. prosecutors.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
VADUZ, Liechtenstein -- Suspected swindler Martin Bramson remained in international limbo yesterday, locked in a Liechtenstein prison and awaiting the next move by U.S. authorities looking to bring him home to Maryland.The Liechtenstein government, which has frustrated U.S. justice officials by refusing to extradite Bramson since his arrest in the tiny European nation 21 months ago, wouldn't speak about the case yesterday and seemed to be getting frustrated.Government officials had tried to send Bramson to Swiss authorities Friday in a secret transfer at a bridge on the Rhine River, but the mission was canceled after Bramson claimed he couldn't walk out of his cell, authorities said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1996
VADUZ, Liechtenstein -- With the snow-capped Alps as the backdrop and the misty Rhine River as the stage, Swiss police waited in vain yesterday afternoon at the next scheduled stop on the long, gilded trail of Martin Bramson.With the help of the Swiss, the U.S. government had hoped to finally get its hands on Bramson, 51, who is believed to have stolen up to $20 million by selling bogus malpractice insurance to doctors via a family-run scheme in Columbia, Md.Bramson's father and brother are in jail for their roles in the scheme, and yesterday Bramson was to have been arrested by the Swiss as he crossed into the country from Liechtenstein.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
As the Supreme Court of Liechtenstein ponders the extradition of suspected Maryland con man Martin Bramson, the hunt is on for between $10 million and $20 million authorities believe he has stashed in banks all over the world.A Baltimore team of "forensic accountants" -- so called because they use detective work to find money hidden by mastermind criminals -- is on the trail of bank accounts in Luxembourg, Panama, Anguilla, Saipan, Japan, Germany, Israel and Switzerland."There's as much as $20 million out there.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
Suspected Maryland con man Martin Bramson has lost his first legal bid to be freed from a Liechtenstein prison, but he is still fighting to block his extradition and to keep more than $3 million seized when he was arrested.A Liechtenstein judge denied Mr. Bramson's appeal for release, saying that one of the white-collar crimes he is accused of seems to be covered by the nation's extradition treaty. A formal extradition hearing is pending, but the judge's move could pave the way for Mr. Bramson's return to face charges in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | January 21, 1995
A Maryland fugitive suspected of bilking nearly $10 million from doctors in a phony insurance scheme was arrested this week at a European border patrol, where Liechtenstein police seized a small fortune in gold bullion and Swiss francs he was carrying, federal prosecutors said yesterday.Martin Bramson, 47, who has dodged authorities worldwide for more than three years, was arrested Thursday with a male friend at the Liechtenstein-Austrian border and is now awaiting extradition back to the United States, authorities said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
As the Supreme Court of Liechtenstein ponders the extradition of suspected Maryland con man Martin Bramson, the hunt is on for between $10 million and $20 million authorities believe he has stashed in banks all over the world.A Baltimore team of "forensic accountants" -- so called because they use detective work to find money hidden by mastermind criminals -- is on the trail of bank accounts in Luxembourg, Panama, Anguilla, Saipan, Japan, Germany, Israel and Switzerland."There's as much as $20 million out there.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Martin Bramson -- international fugitive, alleged confidence man and multimillionaire crook -- sits today in a prison cell in the tiny European nation of Liechtenstein, where it would seem at first glance that his luck has finally run out.But a 1936 extradition treaty between Liechtenstein and the United States may have a loophole and give Mr. Bramson his freedom again: It seems to have no provision for white-collar crime."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | January 21, 1995
A Maryland fugitive suspected of bilking nearly $10 million from doctors in a phony insurance scheme was arrested this week at a European border patrol, where Liechtenstein police seized a small fortune in gold bullion and Swiss francs he was carrying, federal prosecutors said yesterday.Martin Bramson, 47, who has dodged authorities worldwide for more than three years, was arrested Thursday with a male friend at the Liechtenstein-Austrian border and is now awaiting extradition back to the United States, authorities said.
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