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By THOMAS OLIPHANT | November 14, 1991
Washington -- It's bad enough that Vice President Dan Quayle has been slandered by a comic strip.What is incomprehensible is that the press has compounded the slander by treating it as news.The result, on the eve of Campaign '92, is an intriguing glimpse of today's media culture, in which the same standards used in the production of Geraldo Rivera's news-porn can be found in your daily paper.The fact that the press is being played like a violin by rumor-mongers undercuts its efforts to play character cop and advertising fact-checker in political campaigns; moreover, it undercuts the vital bond of trust between purveyor and consumer that is at the core of the news business' existence.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 22, 2014
Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti better not be lying. He left himself open to be put in the same class as former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling on Monday after a nearly 50-minute press conference in which he disputed a recently published report by ESPN challenging the integrity of his franchise. Bisciotti was what you want an owner to be in this situation. He was feisty, defiant, combative and apologetic at times, and repeated his denial of not having seen the second video of running back Ray Rice his wife in an elevator until seven months after the incident.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | January 21, 1999
"I regret that what began as a friendship came to include this conduct."-- President Clinton, Aug. 17, 1998WASHINGTON -- Such is President Clinton's fecundity as a liar, there still are darkly illuminating lies that are just now being scrutinized for the first time, even by people who have been attentive to this scandal. Consider the lie printed above.Like Edgar Allan Poe's purloined letter, Mr. Clinton's lie has been in plain view. For five months. And it was neither a slip of the tongue nor a flustered response to an unexpected question.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 21, 2014
The man-made catastrophe known as the "Affordable Care Act" and "Obamacare" still lurks. And nobody should interpret the absence of daily negative headlines as a sign the law's myriad problems have been rectified, or that there is substance to Harry Reid's claim of "untrue" horror stories following the law's implementation. So, how much damage has been inflicted now that gross ineptitude in foreign policy has replaced gross ineptitude in health care policy? Let me count the ways … and lies.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Is a lie not a lie when it is told by a writer? Apparently, some writers - most notably James Frey at the moment - want us to think so. Readers may presume fiction to be invented, but they expect nonfiction to be the truth and nothing but. That is the expectation wrought by the prefix "non" - not fiction means not made up. Thus, when a writer does lie - and that's the word for it - he or she subverts the line between fiction and nonfiction. And that makes readers wonder whether all writers lie. With the revelation that Frey's A Million Little Pieces - the second-best-selling book of 2005 - was memoir tainted by unknown amounts of fiction, Frey's editor and publisher, Nan Talese, asserted in The New York Observer that memoir invites expansion and fabulism, a blurring of lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
While much is being made of Karl Rove's post-election return to the air this week on Fox, I don't think that's really the news that matters these days at Rupert Murdoch's channel. Reflecting in a way the very post-election GOP malaise that they discussed, both Bill O'Reilly and Rove seemed off their games Wednesday night on "The O'Reilly Factor. " Two of the most self-confident blowhards in American media and political life seemed less confident, less energized, less animated than I have ever seen either when it comes to saying bad things about President Obama.
NEWS
By Howard Kleinberg | June 26, 1996
MIAMI -- Not that long ago, I held out the prospect of a hefty financial reward to anyone who could produce a photograph showing an abhorrently worded Miami Beach hotel sign of decades ago: ''No Jews, No Dogs.''While photos of other, less abusive restrictive notices have survived the years, none containing this language has emerged. My suspicion was that this particularly worded sign never existed, that it grew in the imaginations of those who were being discriminated against as an outlandish icon of that discrimination.
FEATURES
By BEVERLY MILLS | January 29, 1995
Q: My 6-year-old daughter has a tendency to lie. A lot of times she'll lie to me and tell her father the truth. What should I do?L.R., Shelby, N.C.A: Sometimes, without even realizing it, parents actually encourage their children to lie.When children encounter an adult whose reactions to the truth are unpleasantly strong, they tend to modify what they say to these people, says Charles Ford, a psychiatry professor at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, who...
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
Think I'm lying? I'll show you. I'll have my brain scanned. Two companies plan to begin marketing functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, this spring as a new generation of lie detectors for anyone trying to prove he or she is telling the truth. And government use of the technology may not be far behind. Developed in the early 1990s, fMRI identifies brain regions where blood flow increases when someone performs a particular task, such as viewing a picture, touching a fingertip or responding to a question.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 25, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- Maybe I'm just being nostalgic, but it seems to me that the baseball players of the past were much better liars than the guys who currently populate major league clubhouses. Babe Ruth didn't call any shot in the 1932 World Series, but he sure convinced everybody that he did and manufactured -- after the fact -- one of the most memorable moments in baseball history. The 1951 New York Giants were able to keep it a secret for more than a half-century that they were stealing signs during the game in which Bobby Thomson hit the famous "Shot Heard 'Round the World."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
The new fall network TV season begins this week, and one of the most highly touted dramas of the year is one of the biggest disappointments. So big is the failure of “Madam Secretary,” a new CBS drama starring Tea Leoni as Secretary of State Elizabeth Faulkner McCord, that it makes me angry. Usually I like TV shows that rattle my emotional cage, but not this one, which premieres at 8:30 p.m. Sunday. What maddens me about “Madam Secretary” is the lie it's selling about Washington and the people who work there.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The war of words in the race for governor escalated Thursday as Republican Larry Hogan called his Democratic rival a liar and asked him to take down a series of "slanderous" advertisements. "I've been around politics for a long time. I know it's a rough and tumble business," Hogan told reporters at his Annapolis headquarters. "This is the most deceitful, most dishonest campaign that I have ever witnessed in my entire life. " Hogan said Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's television spots mischaracterize his positions on abortion, gun control, tuition rates, taxes and pre-kindergarten.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
According to The Sun's Jeff Zrebiec , Ozzie Newsome claims that Ray Rice did not lie to him about the incident in which Mr. Rice struck his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer ("Highlights from interview with Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, president Dick Cass and GM Ozzie Newsome," Sept. 11). Most would assume that means Mr. Rice did not minimize or represent what happened. Dick Cass, team president, states that he was told Mr. Rice slapped his fiancée and she hit her head. The video certainly proves that version to be wrong.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your article about U.S. citizens serving in the Israeli Defense Forces doesn't address where their loyalty lies. Is it with Israel or with the U.S., since they chose to serve in a foreign country's military rather than their own ( "Americans find meaning in Israeli military service," Aug. 4)? What happens when these fighters return to the U.S. and enter government or media, as so many of them do? Will they continue to put Israel's interests and security ahead of America's, promoting Israeli propaganda?
NEWS
July 15, 2014
As a high school student, I am in full agreement with Alexandra Della Santina in that an astonishing number of girls spend nearly all of their time focused entirely on their appearance ( "Don't hate me because I like myself," July 8). Being able to state, "I think I'm pretty," should absolutely not inspire a pang of guilt. However, possessing the self-assurance to declare such "taboo" words will not launch you into a mindset of confidence when you spend your entire days in hallways full of girls that all share the deep desire to be a pant size 00. In order to fix that problem, we need to focus on what caused this generation of girls to focus so steadily on nothing but their appearance.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 12, 2014
Frank Sinatra's song about Chicago, "My Kind of Town," "a the town that won't let you down," seems dated in light of last weekend's shooting spree that left 16 dead and dozens wounded in 53 separate incidents. According to the Chicago Tribune, "The victims were among 82 people shot between Thursday afternoon and early Monday. "   Chicago wasn't alone in the Independence Day violence. New York City and Detroit combined for 10 dead in 46 shootings, but let's stick with Chicago where violence in mainly poor African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods has become a way of death.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 21, 2005
In an incident now famous in literary circles, in 1979 playwright Lillian Hellman sued writer Mary McCarthy for stating that "every word [Hellman] writes is a lie, including `and' and `the.'" To understand why the playwright found being accused of lying so heinous, you have only to look at her first successful play - The Children's Hour. Though the play was written in 1934, director Donald Hicken's gripping production at Everyman Theatre proves it still packs a wallop. The lie in Hellman's script is manufactured by a spoiled teenaged girl named Mary Tilford, who drums it up as an excuse not to return to boarding school.
NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 1997
Before becoming a biographer, I read autobiographies uncritically. I started, as a teen-ager, with the lives of star athletes. I thrilled to their accounts of exploits on the diamond, gridiron, and hardwood. I admired them, too, for their accounts of generosity with crippled fans and other unfortunates between games. It never occurred to me to be skeptical. These were books, and books are in libraries where teen-agers go to write term papers. Ergo, books are by definition accurate, I thought then.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 18, 2014
Rather than confront poverty by extending jobless benefits to the long-term unemployed, endorsing a higher minimum wage or supporting jobs programs, conservative Republicans are taking a different tack. They're peddling three big lies about poverty. To wit: Lie No. 1: Economic growth reduces poverty. "The best anti-poverty program," wrote Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee chairman, in the Wall Street Journal, "is economic growth. " Wrong. Since the late 1970s, the economy has grown 147 percent per capita but almost nothing has trickled down.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
I don't agree with what Karl Rove, a Republican strategist, said about Hillary Clinton ("Anatomy of a smear," May 15). But what the Democrats did to Sarah Palin and Mitt Romney was just as bad. (The suggestion that Mr. Romney single-handedly caused a women who worked for him to die of cancer is one example.) How about some equal opportunity editorializing on the lying by the current administration about the Affordable Care Act, Benghazi, "Fast and Furious," the IRS scandal, etc.?
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