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NEWS
February 27, 2010
I don't know what summit The Sun's editorial board was watching ("Disagreeing to agree," Feb. 26) but apparently they missed Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin blowing the lid off of the alleged budget savings in the Congressional Budget Office score of the Senate health care bill (the president's release earlier in the week could not be scored by CBO). As Representative Ryan pointed out, when you removed the smoke and mirrors, $131 billion in savings is based on 10 years of revenue and 6 years of costs; necessary elements of reform were removed from of the health care legislation because of their adverse cost effect to the Senate plan, to the tune of $371 billion; and "savings" that are in fact obligated to pay future entitlements are double-counted.
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NEWS
By Dennis Nugent | February 27, 2013
It was a headline that had me shaking my head: "Helmet bill gets objections from bike advocates. " Really? Was there a modifier misplaced or a participle left dangling somewhere? How can anyone object to something that could prevent serious injuries and even save lives? What's the problem with a law that would require a person riding a bike to wear a helmet? An advocate for cycling certainly doesn't want bikes to resemble cigarette packs with warnings like "Riding this thing could kill you. " But let's be honest.
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NEWS
By Dennis Nugent | February 27, 2013
It was a headline that had me shaking my head: "Helmet bill gets objections from bike advocates. " Really? Was there a modifier misplaced or a participle left dangling somewhere? How can anyone object to something that could prevent serious injuries and even save lives? What's the problem with a law that would require a person riding a bike to wear a helmet? An advocate for cycling certainly doesn't want bikes to resemble cigarette packs with warnings like "Riding this thing could kill you. " But let's be honest.
NEWS
February 27, 2010
I don't know what summit The Sun's editorial board was watching ("Disagreeing to agree," Feb. 26) but apparently they missed Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin blowing the lid off of the alleged budget savings in the Congressional Budget Office score of the Senate health care bill (the president's release earlier in the week could not be scored by CBO). As Representative Ryan pointed out, when you removed the smoke and mirrors, $131 billion in savings is based on 10 years of revenue and 6 years of costs; necessary elements of reform were removed from of the health care legislation because of their adverse cost effect to the Senate plan, to the tune of $371 billion; and "savings" that are in fact obligated to pay future entitlements are double-counted.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - In my previous column I laid out why I believe that liberals underestimate how ousting Saddam Hussein could help spur positive political change in the Arab world. This column explores why conservative advocates of ousting Mr. Hussein underestimate the risks, and where we should strike the balance. Let's start with one simple fact: Iraq is a black box that has been sealed shut since Mr. Hussein came to dominate Iraqi politics in the late 1960s. Therefore, one needs to have a great deal of humility when it comes to predicting what sorts of bats and demons may fly out if the United States and its allies remove the lid. Think of it this way: If and when we take the lid off Iraq, we will find an envelope inside.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 12, 2001
I WAS in the middle of my "Voila!" move - lifting the lid off the barbecue kettle cooker and admiring the sizzling chow - when embarrassment struck. The lid handle traveled upward in my hand. But the metal lid stayed smack-dab on the cooker. The welds securing the handle to the lid had given way. Not only was this predicament impractical - moving a hot lid without a handle can be tricky - it was also downright disconcerting. A backyard barbecuer without a cooker handle is like a fish without water, a bee without a flower, a Republican without a tax cut. The core of my being was in question.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | June 17, 1995
Around the house* When cleaning up after painting, wipe off lid and rim of can of paint; rub a coat of vegetable shortening on rims of can and lid. Next time you're painting, the lid will be easier to remove.* Check filters of room air-conditioners at least once a month. If dirty, clean with mild soap and water. Remember to turn off units whenever house is empty.
NEWS
By Cole's Cooking A to Z | June 11, 2000
To help prevent burns to the face and arms when removing the lid from a steaming pan or pot, tilt the lid so that it opens away from you. Let the steam escape before you look or reach into the pan.
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY and SANDRA PINCKNEY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2006
The first time I tasted Beef Daube, I was shooting a segment on French foods for Food Finds, the show I host on the Food Network. The daube (pronounced dobe) arrived frozen from a California gourmet market. There was no time for gentle defrosting. The production assistant simply scraped some into a bowl and zapped it in the microwave for me to eat on camera. Even under these crude conditions, I could tell this was no ordinary beef stew. The taste was amazing - the flavors more intense, the meat more tender.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
My rice never turns out right. How do I get fluffy yet sticky rice that will clump on my fork? There are several methods for cooking long-grain white rice, the most common white rice in this country. Here's the method I use: Bring 2 cups of water to boil in a saucepan with a tight-fitting lid. Add 1 cup rice and 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of salt. Shake the pan a little to spread out the rice, cover, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook for 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, uncover and place a dish towel over the pan. Replace the lid and let it stand.
TRAVEL
By Josh Noel, Tribune Newspapers | October 11, 2009
Name: : Brugo thermal travel cup What it is: : A 16-ounce plastic travel cup that maker Jolex says significantly reduces the temperature of hot coffee one sip at a time while the rest stays piping hot. How it works: : When the cup is tilted back, about 2 ounces are transferred to a shallow "temperature control chamber" just below the rim. The chamber functions as a heat sink, which absorbs heat. When your drink gets to a reasonable temperature, you can change the setting on your lid from "tip and cool" to "sip" and use it like a regular cup. There also is a "lock" setting.
NEWS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Fourteenth-ranked Marriotts Ridge does not have the type of lineup that strikes fear into its opponents, so the Mustangs rely on sound defense and good pitching to win games. In Saturday's Howard County matchup against No. 8 Hammond, Marriotts Ridge made enough plays on offense and locked down the host Golden Bears' potent lineup for a 4-3 victory. The Mustangs handed Hammond its first loss of the season, but they still remain a game back in the conference standings. "We really tried to focus on our game," said Marriotts Ridge assistant coach Michael Doyle, who was filling in for head coach Paul Eckert, who had a family commitment.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
For those more caught up in infield shenanigans than the horses on the track, the big question about Saturday's 133rd running of the Preakness is whether there will be another "Running of the Urinals." The answer: not likely. Preakness officials say that, in an attempt to thwart a repeat of last year's impromptu event -- in which inebriated people raced across the rooftops of a long row of portable toilets while fellow revelers pelted them with open cans of beer -- the portable units at Pimlico this year have been arranged in smaller groups with more space between them.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen and Carrie Mason-Draffen,Newsday | February 23, 2008
Talk isn't cheap on eBay. So the online auction company is tampering with tradition to rein in sellers who post negative comments about buyers. The San Jose, Calif., company recently announced that it would end its feedback structure that enables buyers and sellers to engage in mutual admiration or a flaming war of words after a transaction. Some sellers, the company has said, have gotten out of hand with retaliatory postings that are driving away customers. Some sellers believe that a mutual comment policy is the only way to level the playing field in a battle with customers bent on trashing merchants and hurting their businesses.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Army is accustomed to protecting classified information. But when it comes to the planning for the Iraq war, even an unclassified assessment can acquire the status of a state secret. That is what happened to a detailed study of the planning for postwar Iraq prepared for the Army by the RAND Corp., a federally financed center that conducts research for the military. After 18 months of research, RAND submitted a report in the summer of 2005 called "Rebuilding Iraq." RAND researchers submitted an unclassified version of the report along with a secret one, hoping that its publication would contribute to the public debate on how to prepare for future conflicts.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 27, 2008
Every day, I thank my lucky stars for the luxurious modern conveniences I enjoy that my parents never had: disposable baby wipes, cell phones, drive-through coffee shops, salad in a bag and curiously strong breath mints. But every once in a while, I am reminded of that old French phrase: Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose. Roughly translated, this means: "You will never find a plastic top that fits the container you choose to store leftovers in." My mother used to have Tupperware, and I remember it being a challenge when I was a child to find the matching top for a given container.
TRAVEL
By Josh Noel, Tribune Newspapers | October 11, 2009
Name: : Brugo thermal travel cup What it is: : A 16-ounce plastic travel cup that maker Jolex says significantly reduces the temperature of hot coffee one sip at a time while the rest stays piping hot. How it works: : When the cup is tilted back, about 2 ounces are transferred to a shallow "temperature control chamber" just below the rim. The chamber functions as a heat sink, which absorbs heat. When your drink gets to a reasonable temperature, you can change the setting on your lid from "tip and cool" to "sip" and use it like a regular cup. There also is a "lock" setting.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court yesterday revived a patent suit Crown Holdings Inc. filed against Anheuser-Busch Cos., the world's biggest beer maker, over aluminum can lids. Crown Holdings, maker of about one-fifth of the world's beverage cans, claims that the "Lid of the Future" by Anheuser-Busch and its Metal Container Corp. unit infringes on a patent owned by Crown and used for its "SuperEnd" beverage can. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said U.S. District Judge John Shabaz had wrongly defined a term in the Crown patent and it remanded the case for further review.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Annapolis bar owners, upset over a city council vote to keep a moratorium on granting 2 a.m. liquor licenses, said they are planning to push for change in city government because of what they believe is inequitable treatment. Their comments came yesterday after the city council failed to pass a bill Monday night that would have allowed more 2 a.m. liquor licenses downtown. Alderwoman Classie G. Hoyle, a Ward 3 Democrat who sponsored the legislation, attempted to postpone a vote on the issue, saying more research on the issue was needed.
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