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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | December 20, 2006
A 17-year-old girl accompanied by a 19-year-old Howard County police cadet was able to buy alcohol without showing identification at two county liquor stores, resulting in a combined $1,500 worth of fines. Chirag Patel, licensee for Savage Liquors, in the 8800 block of Gorman Road, drew the heavier penalty from the county's Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board last week - a $900 fine for the March 28 infraction. Detective Martin Johnson was watching the young couple make their purchase just before 9 p.m. Patel told the board that the employee who made the sale was rushed at closing time and no longer works for the store.
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NEWS
September 19, 2010
Penn National Gaming is in the entertainment industry, so perhaps the company is going for laughs of late. Its latest claim — that a state commission's concerns over Penn National's efforts to quash slots machines at Arundel Mills Mall is a violation of their First Amendment rights — can't be serious. Company officials must believe they can play Maryland taxpayers for chumps. On the one hand, Penn National holds a profitable license to operate a 1,500-machine slots parlor in Cecil County.
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NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
Four Howard county restaurants are facing fines totaling $1,050 for allowing drinking after hours. A $100 fine was imposed in a written decision yesterday on the owners of Crickett's Bar, in the 9700 block of Washington Blvd. in Laurel, by the county liquor board, which is made up of County Council members. The county liquor inspector, Detective Martin Johnson, found two employees drinking at 2:53 a.m. Jan. 21. In decisions signed July 27 by the county's Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board, owners of the Ram's Head at Savage Mill and Sonoma's Bar and Grille in Owen Brown Village Center were each ordered to pay $350 for allowing alcohol to be imbibed after the 2 a.m. closing time.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | December 20, 2006
A 17-year-old girl accompanied by a 19-year-old Howard County police cadet was able to buy alcohol without showing identification at two county liquor stores, resulting in a combined $1,500 worth of fines. Chirag Patel, licensee for Savage Liquors, in the 8800 block of Gorman Road, drew the heavier penalty from the county's Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board last week - a $900 fine for the March 28 infraction. Detective Martin Johnson was watching the young couple make their purchase just before 9 p.m. Patel told the board that the employee who made the sale was rushed at closing time and no longer works for the store.
NEWS
August 6, 1997
The county liquor board imposed a six-day suspension on an Eldersburg package goods store for selling beer to an underage police cadet.The Board of License Commissioners announced its decision after hearing testimony that Carrolltown Liquors, in the 6400 block of Ridge Road, sold a six-pack of beer to the 20-year-old cadet after asking for his identification May 23.In lieu of serving the suspension, Jesse David Noland, the liquor store licensee, may pay...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
Leaving a 19-year-old in charge after closing proved expensive for the owners of the Johnny Star Rib Company restaurant in Ellicott City, who were fined $800 by Howard County's liquor board after the teen invited some friends over for a few hours of illegal drinking.The board also meted out fines of $700, $500 and $50 to the license holders of three other Howard County liquor outlets in decisions dated Dec. 1, including one at the county-owned Timbers of Troy Golf Course in the 6100 block Marshalee Drive in Elkridge.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1991
A Harford County councilman expects to introduce a bill Oct. 8 that would establish Maryland's first comprehensive law for regulating the operation of adult bookstores.The bill, sponsored by Councilman Phillip J. Barker, D-District F, is modeled after a more extensive ordinance in Dallas that regulates adult-oriented businesses and would affect all five adult bookstores in Harford and any new ones.Barker, whose district contains four adult bookstores along the U.S. 40 corridor between Havre de Grace and Edgewood, says his bill is not intended to regulate the types of magazines, videos and other sexually oriented material sold.
BUSINESS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Eveningk Sun Staff | June 3, 1991
Steeltown, a new cavernous dance-sports-breakfast bar in the 2400 block of North Point Blvd., is about as dramatic a departure from the typical eastern Baltimore County watering hole as may be possible.In place of the old Whitehouse Tavern, where go-go dancers entertained a blue-collar crowd for lunch in the rundown North Point Plaza shopping center, stands a brand newbuilding within a building, with more features than can be described in one sentence.And no go-go girls.The concept behind Steeltown, which can accommodate 1,500 people, is similar to the Fish Market complex that closed two years ago near the Inner Harbor: distinctly themed bars and restaurants inside a larger building.
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 16, 1996
TOWSON -- With yesterday's approval of a liquor license transfer, Applebee's Neighborhood Grill and Bar can proceed with plans for a 198-seat, casual-dining restaurant at Joppa and LaSalle roads near Towson Marketplace.After listening to testimony by Applebee's licensees Harry T. Rose and John F. Gaburick, the county liquor board quickly granted a request to purchase the liquor license of the defunct Golden Arm Restaurant. It closed last year to make room for an expansion of Giant Food Inc. in the 6300 block of York Road.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 16, 1993
RICHMOND, Va. -- Jeffrey Taylor, a dentist from Covington, Va., might be considered the least likely of six applicants to be awarded a license to build Virginia's first thoroughbred racetrack.He is the only potential licensee -- in a group that includes experienced racetrack operators from Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio and Puerto Rico -- who has never run a pari-mutuel facility.But Taylor indicated in Richmond yesterday that he may file a detailed licensing application with the Virginia Racing Commission before the board's Oct. 1 deadline.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
Four Howard county restaurants are facing fines totaling $1,050 for allowing drinking after hours. A $100 fine was imposed in a written decision yesterday on the owners of Crickett's Bar, in the 9700 block of Washington Blvd. in Laurel, by the county liquor board, which is made up of County Council members. The county liquor inspector, Detective Martin Johnson, found two employees drinking at 2:53 a.m. Jan. 21. In decisions signed July 27 by the county's Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board, owners of the Ram's Head at Savage Mill and Sonoma's Bar and Grille in Owen Brown Village Center were each ordered to pay $350 for allowing alcohol to be imbibed after the 2 a.m. closing time.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2005
Months after attorney Marvin Mandel, the former governor, helped persuade a skeptical Howard County licensing board to approve a liquor license for Young Duk Suh despite the licensee's past infractions, Suh admitted that he violated a number of county liquor laws. Suh's hard-won license for the tiny Rainpia Cafe, on U.S. 40 near Bethany Lane, hangs in the balance again, after a hearing this week before the county's Alcoholic Beverage Hearing Board. Suh, through Robert J. Kim, his new attorney, agreed that when the county liquor inspector, Detective Martin Johnson, visited the business in April, he found several technical violations.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2004
To speed development of a treatment that could reverse nerve damage, Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced yesterday that it licensed an experimental drug to a new Delaware firm with strong venture capital backing - with the option of buying it back should clinical testing prove successful. The Baltimore drugmaker licensed specific U.S. rights to its GPI 1485 drug to Symphony Neuro Development Co., or SNDC, the company said. SNDC is a newly formed Delaware corporation with backing from Symphony Capital Partners LP, a New York investment firm that specializes in development-stage biopharmaceutical programs.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - The last time his old team, the Raiders, reached the Super Bowl, Gene Upshaw was a newly hired labor chief desperately trying to save the football union. The Raiders will once again appear in the championship tomorrow, but Upshaw is in a better position to enjoy the game. The NFL Players Association he has led for two decades has not only averted disaster but grown into the richest union in sports, largely due to a pioneering subsidiary that he founded. Players Inc. goes beyond the commercial endeavors traditionally pursued by players associations.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
Leaving a 19-year-old in charge after closing proved expensive for the owners of the Johnny Star Rib Company restaurant in Ellicott City, who were fined $800 by Howard County's liquor board after the teen invited some friends over for a few hours of illegal drinking.The board also meted out fines of $700, $500 and $50 to the license holders of three other Howard County liquor outlets in decisions dated Dec. 1, including one at the county-owned Timbers of Troy Golf Course in the 6100 block Marshalee Drive in Elkridge.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Biospherics Inc. said yesterday that it could be getting closer to finally making money from production of a sugar substitute it developed a decade ago.The Beltsville company sold licensing rights to the substitute, called D-tagatose, three years ago to MD Foods Ingredients, a Danish dairy producer. MD Foods will produce tagatose, sell it to food manufacturers and pay royalties on the sales to Biospherics.In what Biospherics executives hope is a sign that MD Foods is getting ready to go into high gear on production of tagatose, the Danish company said it is planning to merge with the Swedish dairy-and-food products company Arla.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
The federal government didn't intend to license Otis W. Cutler Jr. to supply guns to drug dealers. But that's what he did with the license they gave him.Over seven months in late 1992 and early 1993, Cutler, a polished, college-educated former Marine with a hobbyist's fervor for firearms, ordered at least 184 handguns for delivery to his Northwest Baltimore home. Nearly all ended up in criminals' hands.In the year since agents of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms caught up with him, police have recovered 37 of Cutler's guns in crimes, including at least three murders.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - The last time his old team, the Raiders, reached the Super Bowl, Gene Upshaw was a newly hired labor chief desperately trying to save the football union. The Raiders will once again appear in the championship tomorrow, but Upshaw is in a better position to enjoy the game. The NFL Players Association he has led for two decades has not only averted disaster but grown into the richest union in sports, largely due to a pioneering subsidiary that he founded. Players Inc. goes beyond the commercial endeavors traditionally pursued by players associations.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
In another indication that a long-standing investigation is reaching a conclusion, the records of seven more licensees have been subpoenaed by a grand jury probing charges of corruption within the Baltimore City Liquor Board.The subpoena issued last week by a grand jury in Baltimore was the second in as many months stemming from an inquiry being conducted by state Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli. Three prior subpoenas required the agency to produce licensing records for more than a dozen other establishments and the personnel records of some liquor board employees.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
With the Duke basketball team riding high and consumers snapping up apparel bearing the university's name, Duke University plans to announce a far-reaching code of conduct tomorrow to ensure that products bearing its name are not made in sweatshops.Duke students and anti-sweatshop groups applauded the code because it goes further than any other university code and will likely be copied by other colleges. Duke has one of the most popular names on sports gear and has 700 licensees that make apparel at hundreds of plants in the United States and in more than 10 other countries.
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