Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLice
IN THE NEWS

Lice

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN, King Features Syndicate | August 13, 2000
Q.This summer I used Vaseline to rid my children of head lice. It worked, but getting the Vaseline out of the hair can be tricky. This is what I did after leaving the Vaseline on their heads overnight: I applied baby oil to the hair, completely saturating it. Next, using a fine-tooth comb, I combed the hair, and the petroleum jelly slid out. It took a fair bit of combing until all the Vaseline was out. Then I shampooed about four or five times. I recommend doing all this outside. My kids wore their bathing suits and sat in plastic lawn chairs with their heads tilted back: You wouldn't want this greasy mess in your tub. The kids complained, of course, because I washed their hair with cold water from the outside faucet, but it was well worth it. We got rid of the lice!
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Don't let it be said that Baltimore isn't at the forefront of the environmental protection movement.  According to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart," Charm City is almost single-handedly helping to save a certain species from extinction.  Unfortunately, it isn't the polar bear. It's the, ahem, crab. And, no, not that crab.         Thanks to Brazilian waxes and similar trends, the ecosystem of pubic lice is endangered, the show's Jessica Williams reports.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | August 4, 2002
Q. Friends have called in a panic about treating lice. Their 6-year-old daughter brought them home from summer camp. When I was a girl, my parents used kerosene, but I hated it. These folks are reluctant to use insecticide on their little girl, so I hope you can tell us some natural ways to get rid of lice. A. Kerosene is an old-fashioned home remedy that is far too risky. Don't use it. A lice expert told us that alcohol is effective for overcoming lice. It is found in HairClean 1-2-3, along with coconut oil, anise oil and ylang-ylang oil. Clinical tests have found this product effective even against lice that have developed resistance to standard treatments.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | October 4, 2009
Jim Gilbert of East New Market writes: I live on the Choptank River, and this time of year we catch a lot of 12- to 14-inch rockfish. Almost all the fish have some sort of lice-type creature in each gill. My question is, should I remove the parasite and let the fish go or should I just let them go as is, parasite and all? Rudy Lukacovic, a state fisheries biologist, replies: Depending upon the size, it could either be Ergasilus or Lironeca ovalis. Argulus, [or fish lice], is usually found on the body, not the gills.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
Q.Last year my granddaughter caught lice at school. I read about using petroleum jelly and told my daughter about it. Well, the whole family tried it together. What a nightmare! Nothing will wash it out!I called the 800 number on the jar, and someone told me they had had a rash of calls because of the article in the paper. The whole family had to go to work and school with petroleum jelly in their hair.I felt awful, because I was the one who told them about your article.A.Guilty as charged.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
It's wintertime at Harman Elementary School, and the nurse knows it by the amount of nitpicking going on. Literally.In recent months, the heads of hundreds of Anne Arundel County students have been infested with six-legged lice and their rice-shaped eggs, called nits, which experts say have become harder to kill in the past year."
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER and ANDREW SCHNEIDER,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
After more than a half century of use and thousands of reports of illness and deaths blamed on the pesticide, the federal government has banned all uses of lindane - except by those who rub it on their scalps and bodies to kill lice and mites. This month, the Environmental Protection Agency banned all uses of lindane as a pesticide, but the Food and Drug Administration has decided to allow its continued use in medicines. Many public health advocates and environmental activists are expressing outrage, and some are gathering petitions to send to the FDA. "Lindane is a known cause of seizures and has no role in the routine management of lice or scabies," said Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua Sharfstein.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | February 28, 2008
My daughter had three stubborn warts on the bottom of her foot that hurt her terribly. We tried salicylic acid tape from the pharmacy. It always burned off all the good skin and left the wart intact. Duct tape didn't work, and neither did freezing them off at the doctor's office. They kept coming back. I made a paste of fresh-scraped turmeric root and taped it on the warts. The warts were completely gone in three applications. Bright-pink, fresh, smooth skin grew in the black-specked holes left behind after the bandage was removed.
NEWS
September 28, 2009
Question: : I am 64 and nearing retirement, but with the stress of the economic downturn, I'm having a difficult time sleeping. Sleeping pills like Ambien or Lunesta cost more than $160 a month, which I cannot afford. What can you recommend for me so I can sleep at night and stay sharp on the job? Answer: : Ambien is available as an inexpensive generic, zolpidem. It has some adverse effects, though: Some people sleepwalk or even sleep-drive while on this drug, and many readers report some generic formulations don't work as well as Ambien.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | October 4, 2009
Jim Gilbert of East New Market writes: I live on the Choptank River, and this time of year we catch a lot of 12- to 14-inch rockfish. Almost all the fish have some sort of lice-type creature in each gill. My question is, should I remove the parasite and let the fish go or should I just let them go as is, parasite and all? Rudy Lukacovic, a state fisheries biologist, replies: Depending upon the size, it could either be Ergasilus or Lironeca ovalis. Argulus, [or fish lice], is usually found on the body, not the gills.
NEWS
September 28, 2009
Question: : I am 64 and nearing retirement, but with the stress of the economic downturn, I'm having a difficult time sleeping. Sleeping pills like Ambien or Lunesta cost more than $160 a month, which I cannot afford. What can you recommend for me so I can sleep at night and stay sharp on the job? Answer: : Ambien is available as an inexpensive generic, zolpidem. It has some adverse effects, though: Some people sleepwalk or even sleep-drive while on this drug, and many readers report some generic formulations don't work as well as Ambien.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 6, 2009
We are lice-free at last with Listerine, alcohol, vinegar and Denorex! We sprayed four heads every night with Listerine before bed, then combed and combed every inch with a nit comb. The lice were gone in three days, but we continued this ritual for seven more days to kill off any newly hatched eggs each day. I soaked the four separate nit combs in rubbing alcohol between uses and dipped them periodically in the alcohol as I combed. We also used vinegar on one severely affected head to loosen the nits.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld | May 3, 2008
Aphids are all over the tips of my sedum, and it's getting distorted. What do I spray? Early season aphid (plant lice) populations explode, then crash. Many predator insects, such as ladybugs, syrphid (flower) flies and even wasps, are enemies of aphids and control their numbers as the season progresses. Look for tan, puffed-up aphids. These are aphid "mummies," dead aphids that have been parasitized. Hold off the insecticides so you don't ruin this natural course of events. Your sedum will outgrow the distortion of their leaves.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | February 28, 2008
My daughter had three stubborn warts on the bottom of her foot that hurt her terribly. We tried salicylic acid tape from the pharmacy. It always burned off all the good skin and left the wart intact. Duct tape didn't work, and neither did freezing them off at the doctor's office. They kept coming back. I made a paste of fresh-scraped turmeric root and taped it on the warts. The warts were completely gone in three applications. Bright-pink, fresh, smooth skin grew in the black-specked holes left behind after the bandage was removed.
FEATURES
By Kristen Kridel | January 10, 2008
Lice salons: lousy idea or necessity? Perched in a hairdresser's chair, 9-year-old Grace Lasky raised her eyebrows as a woman slicked one of the salon's specialty products through her long, straight hair. No, Grace wasn't getting her hair styled in the swank Chicago boutique. The woman pulling a fine-toothed comb through the girl's hair was looking for nits, the eggs laid by lice and a recurring annoyance for the third-grader. "It sort of feels itchy," Grace said. Experts don't agree on the usefulness of delousing salons, but that hasn't stopped them from multiplying.
NEWS
By Regina Nuzzo and Regina Nuzzo,Los Angeles Times | December 22, 2006
In the war against head lice, we face an enemy that is fast and plentiful, with nimble armies that can evolve and outwit standard weaponry. Will we ever take the lead in this scalp-biting, nit-picking arms race? Recently, experts from around the world gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to swap battle tactics at the Third International Congress on Phthiraptera, the group of 3,000 species of wingless parasitic insects that includes Pediculus capitis, bane of parents and school nurses across the land.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Don't let it be said that Baltimore isn't at the forefront of the environmental protection movement.  According to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart," Charm City is almost single-handedly helping to save a certain species from extinction.  Unfortunately, it isn't the polar bear. It's the, ahem, crab. And, no, not that crab.         Thanks to Brazilian waxes and similar trends, the ecosystem of pubic lice is endangered, the show's Jessica Williams reports.
NEWS
July 3, 2001
Nellie Walter Coomes, 92, spent most of her life in Elkridge. She was interviewed by folklorist Alison Kahn on July 3, 1999, as part of an oral history project coordinated by Friends of Patapsco Valley & Heritage Greenway Inc. This is the second of two installments from that interview. It is the final installment of The Sun's Howard history series in observance of the county's sesquicentennial. Dr. Erikson was the doctor that delivered me, and when Dr. Erikson died, he died during the flu epidemic, and he knew that he was sick, and he got [Dr.]
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER and ANDREW SCHNEIDER,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
After more than a half century of use and thousands of reports of illness and deaths blamed on the pesticide, the federal government has banned all uses of lindane - except by those who rub it on their scalps and bodies to kill lice and mites. This month, the Environmental Protection Agency banned all uses of lindane as a pesticide, but the Food and Drug Administration has decided to allow its continued use in medicines. Many public health advocates and environmental activists are expressing outrage, and some are gathering petitions to send to the FDA. "Lindane is a known cause of seizures and has no role in the routine management of lice or scabies," said Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Joshua Sharfstein.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
After riding silently on our scalps for thousands of years, human head lice have finally begun to speak. Genetic evidence teased from the DNA of Pediculus humanus suggests that modern man caught one variety of the itchy pest during an encounter with one of our archaic cousins - possibly Homo erectus, who died out in Asia a short time later, at least 25,000 years ago. Scientists say the findings are the first evidence of direct contact between our own...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.