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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
A top Harford County school official was placed on paid leave yesterday after an August arrest by Baltimore police on a sex charge.Joseph P. Licata, 43, assistant superintendent of operations for the Harford County school system, was arrested Aug. 22 in the city's Eastern District and charged with committing a perverted practice, according to court records. A trial is scheduled Nov. 10.Under state law, perverted practice includes a variety of sex acts aside from conventional male-female intercourse.
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NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
SEATTLE -- For believers in a Lesser Seattle, it was a fantastic month. First, Seattle voters said a resounding "no" to spending public money on a new professional basketball arena, all but begging the NBA SuperSonics to leave town. Strong opposition also has emerged to the mayor's plans for a "Big Dig"-style tunnel project along the waterfront. And the National Weather Service announced last week that November was the rainiest month here in nearly 75 years. Wonderful, from the Lesser Seattle point of view.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
To Harford County school system's supervisor of construction, most of the criticism heaped on the system's building program is unfair."What you don't hear about is that we have built over $100 million worth of projects in the last five years on time and on budget," said Joseph Licata, the system's construction chief. "The criticism we are taking, especially from the media, is simply unfair."The school system, which has three employees, including Mr. Licata, supervising more than $40 million worth of projects this school year, has had well publicized construction problems.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
NO MATTER HOW you calculate it - there is more than one way - enrollment in Harford County public schools is growing and this trend will continue. Under an enrollment projection system approved by the Maryland Department of Planning, the county school situation seems manageable. Although enrollment projections will vary greatly from school to school, the number of elementary-school pupils is expected to rise 4.5 percent during the next five years. It is pretty much the same for the middle schools, which are expecting a 4.2 percent increase in pupils by 2008.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
There aren't many quiet hours at Emmorton and Church Creek elementary schools this summer as workers try to beat the clock and finish the buildings by late August.Construction at both schools was slowed by winter's bad weather, but school officials are determined to have them ready before the opening of school Sept. 7.School board members recently approved $465,000 to speed construction at Emmorton Elementary in Abingdon, which was finally made weather-tight June 24. The money will allow the contractor, H. A. Harris Co. Inc. of Baltimore, to have crews working longer days, six days a week.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
The Harford school board unanimously approved a system last week for grading contractors, prequalifying potential bidders with a point system that the school system's supervisor of construction says will make it easier to control school construction projects.The procedure will "put more teeth in it, protect us better and put us in control," said Joseph P. Licata.The process is designed to identify contractors best suited for school construction, rating them on a five-point scale based on experience, financial background, composition of the building team, safety record and equipment, Mr. Licata said.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
The committee that advises the Harford County school board on enrollment issues told board members this week that redistricting would not be among its suggestions for dealing with classroom crowding in the 2003-2004 school year - even though one school is at nearly 130 percent capacity. The committee, which includes administrators and teachers, identified three schools that are at more than 100 percent capacity this year: Prospect Mill Elementary, Fallston Middle and Bel Air High. Fallston Middle, the most crowded, is at 128.9 percent of capacity.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
As the Harford County public school system begins its annual capital budget deliberations, all eyes are focusing on crowded classrooms. "Our priorities are for a new middle-high school in the Bel Air area and to do something about the overcrowding at the Fallston Middle School," said Joseph Licata, assistant superintendent for operations. Licata's comment came the day after school board member Robert B. Thomas Jr. of Joppatowne proposed closing the doors to new pupils at Fallston Middle School, which is nearly 30 percent over capacity.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
County school officials told a meeting of concerned parents Thursday night that they will spend $60,000 on a new water filtration system to lower the nitrate level and, hopefully, improve the taste of the drinking water at North Harford Middle School. Joseph Licata, assistant superintendent for operation, said bids for the work were opened last week and the new system should be installed within two months. About a dozen parents attended the meeting, which also addressed the school's air quality.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
Riverside parents who wanted to know when construction would resume on their neighborhood elementary school were bitterly disappointed Monday night at their community association meeting.Donald R. Morrison, school spokesman, promised the community that the 600-student Church Creek Elementary School, at Riverside Parkway and Church Creek Road, would open in time for the start of school next year. But he said he did not know when construction would resume.About 50 parents packed Riverside's Community Center, seeking answers to problems that have plagued the Belcamp school's construction, which is about 35 percent complete.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
As the Harford County public school system begins its annual capital budget deliberations, all eyes are focusing on crowded classrooms. "Our priorities are for a new middle-high school in the Bel Air area and to do something about the overcrowding at the Fallston Middle School," said Joseph Licata, assistant superintendent for operations. Licata's comment came the day after school board member Robert B. Thomas Jr. of Joppatowne proposed closing the doors to new pupils at Fallston Middle School, which is nearly 30 percent over capacity.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
County school officials told a meeting of concerned parents Thursday night that they will spend $60,000 on a new water filtration system to lower the nitrate level and, hopefully, improve the taste of the drinking water at North Harford Middle School. Joseph Licata, assistant superintendent for operation, said bids for the work were opened last week and the new system should be installed within two months. About a dozen parents attended the meeting, which also addressed the school's air quality.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
The committee that advises the Harford County school board on enrollment issues told board members this week that redistricting would not be among its suggestions for dealing with classroom crowding in the 2003-2004 school year - even though one school is at nearly 130 percent capacity. The committee, which includes administrators and teachers, identified three schools that are at more than 100 percent capacity this year: Prospect Mill Elementary, Fallston Middle and Bel Air High. Fallston Middle, the most crowded, is at 128.9 percent of capacity.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
When Lisa Licata brought her 5-year-old godson home from his first soccer game, his dad's question was classic: "Who won?" Puzzled, the child asked his mom. "He knows he kicked and he played," she told about 75 youth sports officials at a statewide conference yesterday in Columbia. The topic - how to protect young players from adults. "There's too much emphasis on winning, and no fun," said Licata, vice president of the Florida-based National Alliance for Youth Sports. From the manslaughter conviction last month of Thomas Junta, the 270- pound ice hockey dad who killed Michael Costin, his son's much smaller coach, to the enraged Crofton parents who followed, threatened and cursed at a teen-age referee, "sideline rage" is a major, growing problem in youth sports.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
When Lisa Licata brought her 5-year-old godson home from his first soccer game, his dad's question was classic: "Who won?" Puzzled, the child asked his mom. "He knows he kicked and he played," she told about 75 youth sports officials at a statewide conference yesterday in Columbia. The topic - how to protect young players from adults. "There's too much emphasis on winning, and no fun," said Licata, vice president of the Florida-based National Alliance for Youth Sports. From the manslaughter conviction last month of Thomas Junta, the 270- pound ice hockey dad who killed Michael Costin, his son's much smaller coach, to the enraged Crofton parents who followed, threatened and cursed at a teen-age referee, "sideline rage" is a major, growing problem in youth sports.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
A top Harford County school official was placed on paid leave yesterday after an August arrest by Baltimore police on a sex charge.Joseph P. Licata, 43, assistant superintendent of operations for the Harford County school system, was arrested Aug. 22 in the city's Eastern District and charged with committing a perverted practice, according to court records. A trial is scheduled Nov. 10.Under state law, perverted practice includes a variety of sex acts aside from conventional male-female intercourse.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
When Lisa Licata brought her 5-year-old godson home from his first soccer game, his dad's question was classic: "Who won?" Puzzled, the child asked his mom. "He knows he kicked and he played," she told about 75 youth sports officials at a statewide conference yesterday in Columbia. The topic - how to protect young players from adults. "There's too much emphasis on winning, and no fun," said Licata, vice president of the Florida-based National Alliance for Youth Sports. From the manslaughter conviction last month of Thomas Junta, the 270- pound ice hockey dad who killed Michael Costin, his son's much smaller coach, to the enraged Crofton parents who followed, threatened and cursed at a teen-age referee, "sideline rage" is a major, growing problem in youth sports.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Rainy fall weather and the worst winter in recent memory have put Emmorton Elementary School 47 days behind schedule. The school was to have been completed Aug. 1."We're not panicking yet," said Joseph Licata, the Harford County school system's construction chief. He said the general contractor, H. A. Harris of Baltimore, has promised to make up the lost days by working evenings and weekends.And Mr. Licata said he feels confident that the school will be ready by Sept. 7, the first day of school for students.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
There aren't many quiet hours at Emmorton and Church Creek elementary schools this summer as workers try to beat the clock and finish the buildings by late August.Construction at both schools was slowed by winter's bad weather, but school officials are determined to have them ready before the opening of school Sept. 7.School board members recently approved $465,000 to speed construction at Emmorton Elementary in Abingdon, which was finally made weather-tight June 24. The money will allow the contractor, H. A. Harris Co. Inc. of Baltimore, to have crews working longer days, six days a week.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Rainy fall weather and the worst winter in recent memory have put Emmorton Elementary School 47 days behind schedule. The school was to have been completed Aug. 1."We're not panicking yet," said Joseph Licata, the Harford County school system's construction chief. He said the general contractor, H. A. Harris of Baltimore, has promised to make up the lost days by working evenings and weekends.And Mr. Licata said he feels confident that the school will be ready by Sept. 7, the first day of school for students.
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