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NEWS
April 2, 2011
The U.S. government watched without interfering as the citizens of Tunisia and Egypt changed their governments. We have not dispatched troops to Yemen, Syria or Bahrain as their citizens demonstrate and die. Yet we have intervened in Libya in support of an opposition group that apparently not only is leaderless but is unable to generate support among the people in areas still under government control. Haven't our ill-advised adventures in Iraq and Afghanistan wasted enough lives and treasure?
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NEWS
September 13, 2014
While ISIS is not invincible, even if temporarily defeated, it will morph into a new terror group similar to the off-shoots of al-Qaida ( "ISIS is not invincible," Sept. 9). Unfortunately, radical Islam is not a one-time or one-nation occurrence, as evidenced by recent developments in the Middle East and Africa. Many nations are experiencing its terrorist actions, such as Nigeria, Somalia, Egypt, Libya, all of the Middle East, India and eastern Asia. With the worldwide presence of radical Islam, we can only expect to contain it and not to defeat it entirely.
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NEWS
October 19, 2012
Your headline the morning after the second presidential debate was a nice try, but it was our president, not Mitt Romney, who lied during the debate ("Obama takes an aggressive stand: President accuses Romney of saying things that are 'not true,'" Oct. 17). President Obama claimed to have called the attack on Libya an act of terror the day after he learned about it. Really? Then why was Susan Rice all over the airwaves claiming it was a spontaneous demonstration sparked by a YouTube video?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 4, 2014
Matthew VanDyke, the self-styled "Arab Spring Freedom Fighter" from Baltimore, was a friend of the two American journalists who were beheaded by Islamic State militants. VanDyke met James Foley and Steven Sotloff during his travels in Libya, and it was Foley to whom he first confided what we all later came to learn - that VanDyke was neither a journalist nor a filmmaker when he was captured and held in a Libyan prison for six months in 2011. Instead, he had gone there to fight with the rebels who eventually overthrew dictator Muammar Gaddafi.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
Senator Barbara Mikulski has yet to publicize or state her position on U.S. military involvement in Libya. Considering her "No" vote on use of military force in Iraq in 2002 and her reliably consistent Democratic party line voting, one can only assume she is dodging the issue. But remaining mute is not why Maryland voters pay her the big taxpayer bucks, benefits and pension. It is an insult to our armed forces that Senator Mikulski has time to publish a press release on her website glorifying taxpayer largess of $10,331 to bring broadband Internet access to an elementary school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 24, 2011
A week and a half before the United States launched a war -- or whatever euphemism the administration is currently using while dropping bombs -- against Libya, General David Petraeus and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates joked around about invading the country. The administration is adamant in saying the bombing isn't a war, while the military is joking around about invasions. I guess not everyone is getting the talking points memos.   
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 28, 2011
President Barack Obama's speech Tuesday night about the military action in Libya was composed of 3,362 words. But there were two words conspicuously absent from the 30-minute address: "Oil" and "energy. " Back in the day, when politicians didn't use word like "interest" -- a word that appeared six times in Obama's speech -- as a euphemism, they spoke more plainly.  A quick history lesson (I know, I know, but I promise I'll keep this short): When Europeans were divvying up the deceased Ottoman Empire after World War I, they spoke openly of the desire to control oil fields as their reason for interest in African and Middle Eastern countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 6, 2011
The first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem.  Thankfully, Congress yesterday ended its collective denial and admitted it is completely irrelevant.  Senate leaders on Tuesday abandoned plans to force a vote on authorizing the U.S. war in Libya. You know, the war that the White House creatively calls a “kinetic military action” to avoid calling it a war. The one that’s included nearly 5,000 raids in which NATO shot missiles or dropped bombs.  “If the resolution we’re debating is debated and passed, it would not affect one iota what we’re doing in Libya,” said Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, according to AP. The sad part is: He’s right.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
I'm beginning to believe that Sarah Palin, who could see Russia from her doorstep, had more foreign policy savvy than Mitt Romney. With a chance to act presidential, Mr. Romney instead choose to attack President Obama ("Romney jab on response to video protests draws rebukes," Sept. 13). It seems to me that the horrific act that killed an ambassador and three other Americans is not exactly the event on which to plant a partisan political flag. Such a tragedy should, for a brief moment at the very least, be an opportunity to rally Americans against those who attacked us, not to score political points.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 24, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - First Saddam Hussein falls to the Bush Doctrine, and now Libya's dictator, Col. Muammar el Kadafi, buckling under pressure, announces he will give up his efforts (and they were considerable) to develop weapons of mass destruction. He has also allowed American and British inspectors into Libya to see what he's been up to for the last two decades. The New York Times had advised a different course of action. The newspaper editorialized that the United States should have followed the example of the United Nations and lifted sanctions after Libya's settlement with the families of those killed aboard Pan Am Flight 103 over Scotland in 1988, a terrorist attack in which Colonel Kadafi grudgingly admitted his role.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
Weeks after the attack in Benghazi, American reporters interviewed Ahmed Abu Khatallah at a cafe in Libya, so why did it take our government almost two years to capture him and why now on Fathers Day ( "Benghazi suspect was planning more attacks, U.S. tells U.N.," June 18)? It appears that he was hiding in plain sight. This is just another sign of how our government's leaders are not qualified to do the jobs they are elected or appointed to do. J. Heming, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Charles Campbell | June 19, 2014
The Middle East and Africa are a complex matrix of religious cultural, racial, ethnic, clan and tribal dynamics that have developed over 1,000 years of conflict. Scott Anderson wrote in his new book, "Lawrence in Arabia," that the first inept U.S. government agent in the region, William Yates, established a tradition of misinterpreting the situation that his successors have rigorously maintained for 100 years. The rise of the group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and the return of Sunni control to large sections of Syria and Iraq are not unexpected.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Rep. Elijah Cummings, like so many elected officials, would rather defend his party at all cost and retain his position of power than defend truth and his sworn oath ( "Benghazi probe puts Cummings back in spotlight," May 2). It is obvious that the Obama administration's incompetence and lack of leadership has resulted in bungled situation after situation, including the response to the terrorist attack in Libya. The fight took several hours yet planes and other resources less than two hours away in Italy remained grounded.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
One must wonder then what happened this past week when The Sun ran a front-page story about the racial comments made by Clippers owner Donald Sterling but made no mention of the stunning disclosure of the September 14, 2012 email from White House aide Ben Rhodes. That email played a central role in preparing former UN Ambassador Susan Rice for the appearance on TV in which she wrongly blamed the killing of four Americans in Benghazi, Libya, on protests over an Internet video rather than on terrorist attacks, no doubt motivated by the upcoming November presidential election.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
The deadly 2012 attack by militants on U.S. government posts in Benghazi, Libya, was preventable according to a recently released report by the Senate Intelligence Committee, and it was the fault of the U.S. State Department for inadequate security precautions. Several months before the attacks on an American diplomatic post and CIA compound in Benghazi, U.S. intelligence agencies had issued numerous reports warning that security in eastern Libya was deteriorating and that U.S. personnel and posts there were at risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
CBS News put correspondent Lara Logan and producer Max McClellan on leave Tuesday in the wake of an internal investigation that was critical of their flawed report on the attack on an American compound in Benghazi, Libya. The Sept. 11, 2012 attack left four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens, dead. The forced leaves of absence coupled with the internal investigation acknowledging serious errors and conflicts in reporting the "60 Minutes" piece give the appearance of CBS News taking substantive action.
NEWS
April 1, 1992
United Nations sanctions against Libya, limited as they are, mark the Security Council's latest imposition of mandatory sanctions against a rogue regime. It also took action against Iraq for invading Kuwait in August 1990, and Iraq's defiance led to the gulf war and the crackdown on Iraqi weapons-making that has come after.In shutting down Libya's civil aviation link with the world, the Security Council has sought a punishment to fit the crime of airliner sabotage. The world community demands that Libya produce for trial the six suspects in the destruction of an American plane over Scotland in 1988 and a French airliner over Niger the next year with a combined death toll of 441. Since the suspects are Libyan intelligence officers, the dictator Muammar el Kadafi must want to loyally protect his agents and prevent their testifying.
NEWS
March 24, 2011
The Obama administration has made the right call on Libya. Humanitarian assistance, especially protecting rebels and civilians from outright massacre, is the right thing to do and can help improve our standing in the Muslim world. Linda K. Brown, Baltimore
NEWS
By Timothy Meyer | May 29, 2013
Conservatives have long viewed Washington as one giant, inevitable disaster waiting to happen. For conservative political strategists, part of our job is helping to frame that eventual disaster as President Barack Obama's fault. But conservatives should resist the temptation to be too Obama-centric in their criticisms of Washington's recent scandals. Yes, a president is in charge of, and ultimately responsible for, the federal government. But while Mr. Obama may be a tempting foil in the short term, especially with midterm elections on the horizon, it's important to not lose sight of longer-term objectives.
NEWS
By Joe Davidson, The Washington Post | May 24, 2013
Let's take a break from the raging discord that has dominated Washington lately by remembering federal employees who died abroad in service to their country. With so much attention focused on what the government has done wrong, we'll end the week with words about government workers who died trying to do right. Actually, four of them are central to one of the controversies — last year's attack on the American post in Benghazi, Libya. But this piece will focus on the individuals who lost their lives and not on the political messaging that still haunts their deaths.
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