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By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1995
WELL, WE successfully weathered the first of the holidays in this lively season. Halloween was great fun! The terrific weather kept many out of the Savage library and on the streets where ghosties belong that night. However, on the negative side, few area residents managed to see the Savage branch library staff resplendent in their holiday finery.Branch manager Donna Matthews wore her by now-traditional get-up as Batwoman. Henry Lattimore, assistant branch manager, and normally a spiffy dresser, dressed as a Generation Xer, complete with spiked hair and boxers over trousers.
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NEWS
January 13, 2014
Harford County Public Library collected handmade hats and scarves during December to donate to local Faith Communities and Civic Agencies United (FCCAU) shelters before the holidays. More than 500 donations poured in from library staff, customers, knitting groups and local crafting groups. Shelter clients received the items wrapped in gift bags during the week of Christmas.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
Resentment is brewing among Carroll County Public Library employees over a new pay scale that raises the earning potential for a few supervisory positions while lowering that of middle- and lower-level jobs."
NEWS
August 7, 2013
More and more, the last things on the minds of patrons strolling into Baltimore County's public libraries are books - you know, those quaint, bound collections of paper pages stacked on shelves. Computer stations and audiobooks were the early library offerings for which no trees were felled. Now, it's e-books and e-readers that patrons want. The county library system is working to meet the challenge of customers who expect more, who do not want to turn pages, but to click buttons on their Nooks, Kindles, iPads or home computers.
NEWS
By Herbert Foerstel | April 29, 2002
AN FBI agent visited the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library at the University of Maryland, College Park, in April 1986, asking staff members to report on the reading habits of "anyone with a foreign-sounding name or foreign-sounding accent." That same day, the agent visited the Chemistry Library, asking again for surveillance and also requesting any records of database searches. At the University of Maryland, as at most American universities, a large percentage of faculty and students have "foreign-sounding names or foreign-sounding accents."
NEWS
January 13, 2014
Harford County Public Library collected handmade hats and scarves during December to donate to local Faith Communities and Civic Agencies United (FCCAU) shelters before the holidays. More than 500 donations poured in from library staff, customers, knitting groups and local crafting groups. Shelter clients received the items wrapped in gift bags during the week of Christmas.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Westminster library workers, armed with pen and paper, are going after drivers who use library parking spaces as an all-day free parking lot.A new plan to watch the lot for cars that overstay the two-hour limit comes in the wake of an aborted proposal to install meters behind and beside the library building on Main Street.Carroll County Public Library trustees dropped that proposal when library patrons complained that meters would unfairly penalize people who park in the spaces to use the library.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A majority of the Supreme Court justices rose up angrily against the Library of Congress yesterday for letting the public in on some of the court's latest -- and usually best-kept -- secrets.Hinting that they want the library to do more to justify making public the papers of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall -- papers that reveal private deliberations as recent as two years ago -- the majority threatened to send their own files somewhere else.Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist put on an extraordinary public display of the justices' personal pique over what they regarded as a violation of their usual secrecy by releasing a letter he had an aide deliver by hand to Librarian of Congress James H. Bil-lington's office.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The Carroll County Public Library Board of Trustees approved applying for a $15,000 federal grant to prepare a five-year long-range plan for growth at their monthly meeting Wednesday.The money will be used to hire a marketing consultant to guide library management in setting goals for 1992 to 1997 and pay for printing the study.Data for the previous study, which will expire at the end of the year, was gathered by a consultant but interpreted by library staff, which required a lot of time, said CCPL Assistant Director Gail Griffith.
NEWS
September 21, 1991
Austin Howard Baker Jr., who retired as a library assistant at The Baltimore Sun, died yesterday of complications to diabetes at his home on East Collingham Drive in the Dundalk area. He was 62.He retired last December, having joined the newspapers as a copy boy in 1945 and then worked in the wire room from 1953 until he joined the library staff in 1981.The Baltimore native served in the Army during the Korean War.A deacon and a tenor in the choir at the Colgate Baptist Church, he was a member of the Glen Burnie Lodge of the Moose.
EXPLORE
April 29, 2013
Little Leapers was unveiled to an excited crowd of children and caregivers along with program sponsors and library staff on March 27 at the Bel Air library. More than 80 people were in attendance, including 30 children, to see the new kits and have the opportunity to participate in several experiments put on by local scientists. Little Leapers is Harford County Public Library's newest early literacy initiative which consists of pre- and early-literacy kits that focus on fostering and developing pre- and early literacy skills through STEM (science, technology, engineering and math)
EXPLORE
September 27, 2012
Jarrettsville Elementary School, Fallston Middle School and Patterson Mill High School are the recipients of the Harford County Public Library (HCPL) 2012 Summer Reading Trophies. The trophies were awarded to the public elementary, middle and high schools with the highest percentage of students who completed the Dream Big: READ Summer Reading Program. In addition, John Archer School was presented with an Extraordinary Achievement Award for having the largest increase in completions between 2011 and 2012.
EXPLORE
July 3, 2012
Local teens Leah Getz and Kara Lynch recently set up a lemonade stand and donated the proceeds to the Havre de Grace library. Surprising library staff with their generous and unexpected gesture, the donation was made during the first week of Harford County Public Library's Summer Reading Program. The proceeds will be used to help support children and teen programming at the Havre de Grace library. Upcoming programs at the Havre de Grace library include visits from special presenters The Bubble Lady on July 14 and The Extreme Balloon Man on July 26. Children grades three and up can "Catch a Dream" by making a dream catcher on July 17 and children of all ages can participate in Stargazing Fun on July 31. Middle and high school teens are invited to get creative with a Black Light T-shirts craft program on July 21. All program information is available at HCPLonline.org.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Joan B. Walters, a former Baltimore Sun editorial assistant who earlier had worked in the newspaper's library, died New Year's Day of heart failure at her Rosedale home. She was 62. Joan Barnes was born in Baltimore and raised in Turners Station. She was a 1967 graduate of Dundalk High School. In 1969, Mrs. Walters joined the library staff of The Baltimore Sun, where she worked as an assistant. In 1991, she became an editorial assistant in the newspaper's old Harford County bureau in Bel Air. She was later reassigned to The Sun's metropolitan desk, where she continued working until retiring in 2007.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Dreams don't die, even in the worst recession in memory, which is why Sean Costello of Ellicott City brought his family to Howard County Executive Ken Ulman's annual budget hearing to bolster his plea for a 50-meter indoor swimming facility. Costello and other pool boosters, along with people from Elkridge who want a new firehouse, a larger library, a new elementary school and a potential high school site, added to the often-heartfelt pleas from people representing service nonprofits not to cut already diminished state funding.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
The Bank of America Charitable Foundation announced a $500,000 donation to the Enoch Pratt Free Library yesterday to provide free wireless Internet access at the Central Library and five other branches across Baltimore. The foundation is providing the money because it says about 40 percent of city households don't have access to the Internet. "For most of them, the only way to go online to get information they need to live and grow is to use one of the 500 public-access computers here at the Pratt libraries," said Pratt CEO Carla D. Hayden.
NEWS
May 22, 2004
Elizabeth H. Bunch, a retired Enoch Pratt Free Library staff member who won a library outstanding service award, died of complications of diabetes Wednesday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 76. Elizabeth Howard was born in Litchfield, Ky., and attended schools in West Virginia. She moved to Baltimore in the 1940s. She joined the Pratt library staff in 1957 as a clerical assistant at the Patterson Park branch. She also worked in the Govans, Waverly, Fells Point, Roland Park and Federal Hill branches.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Genealogical materials will be moved to a new area of the Westminster library, where volunteers, instead of employees, will assist family researchers.The county's library board unanimously approved last night an ad hoc committee's plan to retain the genealogical collection in a separate area, instead of having the volumes removed from the library as initially proposed.The library's administration had proposed eliminating a staff position in the genealogical program and moving the collection from the Westminster branch's Davis Room to cut $10,653 from the fiscal 1993 budget.
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