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NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Harford County Library officials got a taste of what a newly remodeled $7.5 million library might look like Thursday when architects studying the feasibility of renovating the 34-year-old Bel Air library gave a formal presentation of the results of their study.Getz Taylor Architects Inc. is the Havre de Grace firm contracted the county to study the feasibility of expanding and remodeling the Bel Air library on its current site at Hickory and Pennsylvania avenues. The firm described two options at the Board of Library Trustees' May meeting.
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NEWS
By Nicholas C. D'Adamo Jr | April 9, 2001
BALTIMORE CITY is about to condemn and demolish 12 buildings at Eastern Avenue and Conkling Street in Highlandtown to build an $8 million, 45,000-square-foot branch for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Supporters say that building a mega-library there will bring the Highlandtown business district back to life and improve the Pratt's service to the public. They are wrong. The $8 million building plan is not a wise use of taxpayer money at a time when we are cutting programs, closing fire stations and library branches and thinking about layoffs of city employees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 17, 2007
Richard Hart, humanities department chief at the central Enoch Pratt Free Library, died Tuesday of complications from old age at Roland Park Place. The former Charles Village resident was 99. Recalled yesterday for his encouragement of aspiring writers and patience with library patrons, he wrote poetry and had a scholar's interest in Edgar Allan Poe. He was also the author of a biography of the library's founder, Enoch Pratt. Mr. Hart was born in Baltimore and raised on Harlem Avenue.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
Few people come into Kirsch Cleaners on Jarrettsville Pike these days. But manager Nancy Sutton doesn't think higher prices are to blame.Instead, she points to the Jacksonville minilibrary, which the county closed in February. Since then, traffic is down at all 20 shops in the Manor Center strip mall where the library was located."They have no reason to come into this shopping center," she said.Rick Shapiro, 38, who works at Domino's Pizza, agrees. About five customers came into the shop each day from the library, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
After Crystal Langdon checks out 22 books from her library on Reisterstown Road on Wednesday, she plans to carry them home on the Metro in her purse. And preteen boys enrolled at St. Ignatius Loyola Academy may soon be able to leave their book bags at home, because their reading lists for the entire year will fit into their back pockets. For the past three years, library patrons have been able to download virtual books onto some electronic readers, such as Barnes & Noble's Nook, or the Sony Reader, for the three-week loan period that is standard for hardcover and paperback volumes.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Kathy MacMillan hooked the index finger of her right hand around her left thumb. The index finger of her left hand wiggled freely, as if it was trying to escape. In the shade of a few oak trees in a Sykesville park, she explained to 30 children how Goldilocks escaped from the three bears' house - in sign language. The kids quickly got the hang of forming the sign for "running," but the moms in the back were having a bit more trouble. "It's hard," Susan Stephey said to a fellow mother, who was also struggling with the maneuver.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
You can order hamburgers without getting out of your car. You can deposit a paycheck at the drive-through lane of a bank. In some communities, you can buy liquor, pick up prescription medicines and get married, all from your car's front seat. A drive-up window for a library is the next logical step. If Carroll County officials and their architect can find space for a drive-through lane around the brick library branch along the Liberty Road commercial strip in Eldersburg, patrons will be able to return and check out books from their cars.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Hampton "Skip" Auld does not mince words when he talks about the struggles of Anne Arundel County's library system the past few years. "We were devastated," the library director says. "We were on the ropes. " Years of government cuts during an economic downturn took its toll on the libraries. There was less money to buy new books, audio books and DVDs. Magazine subscriptions were canceled. Sunday hours were cut. Employees had no raises. During those years, Auld spearheaded a cheery but relentless campaign on the library's behalf.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
Facing the prospect of more cutbacks in library hours and other declines, Anne Arundel County Public Library administrator Hampton "Skip" Auld is taking a page from other services clamoring for scarce county dollars. Auld is turning to the community for support, seeking to energize library patrons in much the same way that public schools have turned parents into lobbyists. He is hoping that a public outcry will pressure elected officials to keep reductions in the library budget well below the 10 percent that County Executive John R. Leopold has asked of each agency.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
With the days of the honor system long gone, the Howard County Library is throwing the book at lax patrons.In the past two years, the library -- backed by the county Office of Law -- has obtained civil judgments against nearly 60 patrons, requiring many to pay hundreds of dollars in fines for keeping library materials long past their due dates.Until the mid-1980s, the library would just send bills tallying late fees and the cost of unreturned materials to careless borrowers, said Betty Crader, head of the library's circulation department.
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