Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLibrary Patrons
IN THE NEWS

Library Patrons

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 7, 1997
The Howard County library is selling a cutting-edge database service designed to enhance how the knowledge-hungry gather information while chiseling a new niche for area libraries.For $85 a year, 'Round the Clock DataNet can connect library patrons throughout Maryland to 27 business and educational databases 24 hours a day in their homes and offices.Heralded by library administrators as a one-of-a-kind information system, DataNet illustrates the changing role of libraries -- from free purveyors of books and periodicals to sellers of expanded technology used beyond the library's walls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
Advertisement
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Three days remain to return overdue library materials to Enoch Pratt Free Library branches without paying fines. The library's "Amnesty Week" runs through Saturday. Fines are being forgiven this week in order to encourage library patrons to register or renew their library cards in September, Library Card Sign-up Month. Normally, the maximum fine on adult or young adult cards is $6 an item. On children's cards the maximum fine is $3 an item. Fine forgiveness does not apply to e-readers, laptops, and materials lent by other library systems.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | February 1, 2014
Andrew Carnegie was a social Darwinian. He wanted to give the fittest the tools to rise to the top. Public libraries - as spreaders of skills, knowledge and culture - advanced his goal. Often hailed as Carnegie II, Bill Gates is if nothing else a champion of standardized testing and other forms of meritocracy. So here's a not-so-modest proposal for one of planet Earth's richest people, now worth around $78.5 billion. Update Carnegie's vision. Work toward a national digital library endowment, which, as I'll show, could boost K-12 test scores.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
It's like the superhero of library cards: flashy and vibrant in appearance, and able to leap over county borders in a single bound. Public librarians across Maryland are preparing to unleash the new MPOWER card, which gives the bearer the ability to borrow from any of Maryland's 174 public libraries. Yesterday, state officials chose the new library in Odenton - a fast-developing part of Anne Arundel County near the Howard County line - as the venue in which to unveil the eye-catching turquoise card, which presents different images as the holder tilts the card at various angles.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
A Laurel man who threatened suicide in the parking lot of a Columbia library Monday will be charged with assaulting police officers, weapons violations and other offenses, Howard County police said yesterday. Doctors at Howard County General Hospital were evaluating yesterday the psychological condition of the man, Glen Williams, 38, of the 8400 block of Dulwick Court. An arrest warrant charging Williams with two counts of first-degree assault, two counts of reckless endangerment, disorderly conduct and illegal possession of a firearm was issued yesterday, said Sgt. John Superson, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 21, 1997
Carroll County public library patrons should soon be able to pick up their telephone to renew books and conduct other circulation-related functions.A new telephone-computer system called TeleCirc will enable the library to deliver electronic notices and accept calls from library users. Using a personal identification number, patrons will be able to renew overdue books, get a list of materials they've checked out, and cancel or confirm items on hold."[The system] is going to speed up the notification of when a book is ready for people which will add to the circulation of popular items," said Scott Reinhart, director of automation, support and technical services for the library.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
Baltimore library patrons will not receive advance warning about branch closings after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he won't sign a bill requiring public hearings on the shutdowns.The legislation, sponsored by Councilman Martin O'Malley of the 3rd District, was passed last month by the council and would have required the Enoch Pratt Free Library to justify branch closings through public forums.The bill was created after the library closed two of its 28 branches -- in Charles Village and Morrell Park -- last summer.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
The Baltimore County Public Library has launched a new service that will give patrons access to more than 100 magazine titles on their computers and mobile devices. Patrons can sign up for the Zinio service through the library system's website (www.bcpl.info) and download the application to their tablet, smartphone or computer for free. The service gives them access to the library's digital magazines 24 hours a day. The program is compatible with iPhones, iPads and other tablets, Androids, PCs and Macs, but not with Kindle or Nook, library officials said.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Canton branch of Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library will close at the end of January for a two-year renovation project. The renovation of the 126-year-old library will include a new meeting room, furniture and circulation desk, additional computers and enhancements for wheelchair accessibility. Additional improvements will also be made to the exterior of the historic building. The library closes beginning Jan. 30. During the renovation, library patrons can visit other nearby locations: Southeast Anchor Library at 3601 Eastern Avenue and the Patterson Park Branch at 158 North Linwood Avenue.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Hampton "Skip" Auld does not mince words when he talks about the struggles of Anne Arundel County's library system the past few years. "We were devastated," the library director says. "We were on the ropes. " Years of government cuts during an economic downturn took its toll on the libraries. There was less money to buy new books, audio books and DVDs. Magazine subscriptions were canceled. Sunday hours were cut. Employees had no raises. During those years, Auld spearheaded a cheery but relentless campaign on the library's behalf.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
The Baltimore County Public Library has launched a new service that will give patrons access to more than 100 magazine titles on their computers and mobile devices. Patrons can sign up for the Zinio service through the library system's website (www.bcpl.info) and download the application to their tablet, smartphone or computer for free. The service gives them access to the library's digital magazines 24 hours a day. The program is compatible with iPhones, iPads and other tablets, Androids, PCs and Macs, but not with Kindle or Nook, library officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Three of the most popular books in America are being kept off the shelves of the Harford County Public Library system because administrators consider them to be pornographic. British author E.L. James' erotic trilogy about a steamy affair between an innocent literature student and an entrepreneur with dangerous desires has topped the list of Amazon.com's best-selling books. Ditto for the New York Times' best-selling fiction list. Every other library system in Central Maryland owns copies of "Fifty Shades of Grey" and its two sequels, and maintains waiting lists of hundreds of eager readers who want to check them out. Harford County's reluctance to purchase the novels in the face of overwhelming public demand and accusations of censorship places it in among an embattled minority of libraries nationwide.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Canton branch of Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library will close at the end of January for a two-year renovation project. The renovation of the 126-year-old library will include a new meeting room, furniture and circulation desk, additional computers and enhancements for wheelchair accessibility. Additional improvements will also be made to the exterior of the historic building. The library closes beginning Jan. 30. During the renovation, library patrons can visit other nearby locations: Southeast Anchor Library at 3601 Eastern Avenue and the Patterson Park Branch at 158 North Linwood Avenue.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Three days remain to return overdue library materials to Enoch Pratt Free Library branches without paying fines. The library's "Amnesty Week" runs through Saturday. Fines are being forgiven this week in order to encourage library patrons to register or renew their library cards in September, Library Card Sign-up Month. Normally, the maximum fine on adult or young adult cards is $6 an item. On children's cards the maximum fine is $3 an item. Fine forgiveness does not apply to e-readers, laptops, and materials lent by other library systems.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
When Howard County unveils its new 63,000-square-foot library in December, patrons will be welcomed into a high-tech facility with a computer classroom and a historical center. Officials also plan a garden that they envision will be charming enough for weddings. Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library system will this month open its first small eatery in a neighborhood branch, where people can snack on fresh pastries, sandwiches or coffee while they use the library's wi-fi. Far from the stuffy, silent archives of old, today's libraries are inviting patrons to come often and linger, have a snack and meet with friends.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
To bolster the financial future of Carroll County's public libraries, the library system's board of trustees has approved the creation of an endowment to pay for renovation and expansion work and other projects.The board last week approved an agreement with the Community Foundation of Carroll County to manage the fund, which will be established with $6,000 in donations to the library, mainly from residents."We are looking for ways to make our limited resources go a little farther and attract some additional funds that aren't directly related to texts," said Scott Reinhart, assistant director of the county's library system.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2001
When the Westminster branch of Carroll County Public Library reopens after closing for a few days this month, patrons will find a reconfigured interior -- complete with a cafe area. The East Main Street branch will be closed Thursday through Saturday, and the changes will make more efficient use of staff and space, said branch manager Lois Leasure. The cafe area will include gourmet coffee, snack machines and seating space. Periodicals will be relocated next to the cafe for convenient reading during patrons' coffee breaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
After Crystal Langdon checks out 22 books from her library on Reisterstown Road on Wednesday, she plans to carry them home on the Metro in her purse. And preteen boys enrolled at St. Ignatius Loyola Academy may soon be able to leave their book bags at home, because their reading lists for the entire year will fit into their back pockets. For the past three years, library patrons have been able to download virtual books onto some electronic readers, such as Barnes & Noble's Nook, or the Sony Reader, for the three-week loan period that is standard for hardcover and paperback volumes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 17, 2007
Richard Hart, humanities department chief at the central Enoch Pratt Free Library, died Tuesday of complications from old age at Roland Park Place. The former Charles Village resident was 99. Recalled yesterday for his encouragement of aspiring writers and patience with library patrons, he wrote poetry and had a scholar's interest in Edgar Allan Poe. He was also the author of a biography of the library's founder, Enoch Pratt. Mr. Hart was born in Baltimore and raised on Harlem Avenue.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.