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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The Savage branch of the Howard County Public Library is once again set to become an open book after an extensive renovation designed to modernize the aging facility and highlight a science and technology theme. "The goal was to make this a more open and inviting space," said Valerie Gross, president and CEO of the county library system. "We want to really emphasize the idea of public education for all. " After a year-and-a-half closure, the branch will celebrate a grand opening July 22. Patrons have used a nearby temporary location during the $6.1 million county-funded revamp.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Anne Arundel County library officials say they may seek another site option for a new Annapolis library after one potential location was ruled out this past week. The owners of a property in Parole, on Somerville Road between Route 2 and Old Solomons Island Road, told the library that they're not interested in selling, according to Hampton "Skip" Auld, director of the library system. The library system had considered but then dismissed a location next to Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium on Rowe Boulevard because of the potential for traffic problems and the high cost of building, Auld said.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1995
Opening the Westminster branch of the Carroll County Public Library on Sundays would be a popular move, but library officials said they won't do it if it means giving up money for books and materials."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
Harford County Library officials say they will be able to keep the library open 20 more hours a week starting in September if the increased funding in the county's fiscal 1995 budget is approved by the County Council.Library Director Philip A. Place, who detailed the plans to the County Council in a budget work session Thursday, said County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's proposed library budget of $5.1 million will allow restoration of 50 percent of the hours that were cut in September 1992 because of financial constraints.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1994
Harford County library officials say County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's proposed budget for fiscal 1995, which adds $818,664 to the library's operating budget, will go a long way toward improving its collection and restoring hours of service to their 1992 level.Library Director Philip A. Place said the increase, which amounts nearly 19 percent over last year's budget of $4.33 million, will help meet the library's two key goals -- buying more books and keeping the nine library branches open longer.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
City library officials believe Holes will be the perfect way for area youth to fill in those dreary summer gaps. Louis Sachar's 1998 novel about friendship and destiny has been selected as the fourth annual "Baltimore's Book" and will be handed out to children in fourth grade and above who register for the state's summer reading program today at an event at Mondawmin Mall. Holes, a popular children's book that spawned a Disney feature film, chronicles the odyssey of Stanley Yelnats, who is wrongly sent to a boys' detention camp and ordered by a vicious warden to dig holes all day. The book interweaves two mysterious story lines brought together and resolved by Stanley's courage.
NEWS
May 1, 1996
A PROPOSAL BY Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to close 10 of the 28 branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library deserves the public outcry it is receiving. It's not that every branch is sacred and should never be closed. But any closing should be the result of careful study and the establishment of viable service alternatives for neighborhoods. No such study has occurred.Past experience should have taught the mayor that no city neighborhood will voluntarily give up its library branch. Many branches have become anchors of their communities, especially safe, quiet places where children can gather after school to do homework while waiting for parents to return home from their jobs.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
ANNAPOLIS - Carroll library officials told a House committee yesterday that changing the way the county selects people to serve on the library's board of trustees would have a "chilling effect" on the community. Linda Mielke, library director, said she feared the Carroll delegation's proposal to alter the pool of candidates would open the selection process and put people with narrow political and religious agendas on the board. "We're looking for people who have a special interest in the Carroll County Public Library," Mielke told the Ways and Means Committee during a hearing on the bill yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 11, 1991
County library officials, hoping to avoid cutbacks in services and book purchases during this difficult economic period, are seeking a 50percent increase in overdue fines and photocopying fees.Director Edward Hall has recommended that the fine for overdue materials be increased from 10 to 15 cents per day and that the maximum charge for a single overdue item be raised from $4 to $6. The cost of photocopying would rise from 10 to 15 cents per page.The 24-member Board of Library Trustees is scheduled to decide onthe fee increases at its Thursday meeting.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County library officials are hosting a series of community meetings to share information about the options for a new regional library in Annapolis. The first meeting was scheduled for Thursday at Annapolis High School, with additional sessions Sept. 9 at Broadneck High School and Sept. 15 at South River High School. All meetings will be held at 7 p.m. At each meeting, county library CEO Skip Auld and architects will discuss details of three possible sites for a new library in the Annapolis area: the site of the current library at 1410 West Street, a site adjacent to Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium on Rowe Boulevard, and a location at the intersection of Old Solomons Island Road and Somerville Road in the Parole community.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The children's Storyville section of the Baltimore County Public Library's Woodlawn branch, 1811 Woodlawn Drive, will be closed Wednesday and Thursday to undergo some structural work and painting, according to library officials. The popular children's area is expected to re-open Friday, and the main Woodlawn branch will remain open during the project. Those who wish to visit a Storyville area in another county library can go to the Storyville at BCPL's Rosedale Branch, 6105 Kenwood Ave.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The Savage branch of the Howard County Public Library is once again set to become an open book after an extensive renovation designed to modernize the aging facility and highlight a science and technology theme. "The goal was to make this a more open and inviting space," said Valerie Gross, president and CEO of the county library system. "We want to really emphasize the idea of public education for all. " After a year-and-a-half closure, the branch will celebrate a grand opening July 22. Patrons have used a nearby temporary location during the $6.1 million county-funded revamp.
NEWS
June 1, 2014
The Howard County Library is expanding its online access for customers to include additional magazines, movies and music with the June 2 rollout of three new services - Zinio, hoopla and OneClick Digital.  Library officials say more than 90 magazines and thousands of movies, shows, music albums and audio books will be available free to county library cardholders to download and stream via hclibrary.org. Officials said the new e-content is part of the library's effort to enhance self-directed educational opportunities by providing customers access to resources any time.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A financial audit of the Enoch Pratt Free Library found that sloppy bookkeeping and poor oversight have resulted in balance questions, negative accounts and late reimbursements to city coffers. After a presentation before the city's spending panel Wednesday, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young asked library officials to return in 90 days to discuss their plan to correct the accounting troubles. Young said while he is a "big supporter of the library system," he is concerned, especially since some of the problems have continued for several years.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Got library fines? The Enoch Pratt Free Library branch system is offering delinquent book returners $1 off library fines for every can of food donated to the underprivileged. The library's "Food for Fines" program will run from Jan. 2 through Jan. 31 with all proceeds benefiting the Maryland Food Bank, Baltimore's public library system website reported. "There's no limit on the amount of cans that can be donated!" the website said. "For example, 5 cans = $5 off of your library card fines.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1999
Readers navigating the stacks at the Patterson Park branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library are drawn to writing on the wall: "Coleccion En Espanol."Under the poster, two long shelves offer a smattering of bilingual and Spanish-language reference materials, nonfiction books, children's stories and other literature, all meant to entice the city's growing Latino community to use the library."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Julie Drabenstadt lives two minutes from the Savage library, but the branch is small and often crowded. Children's classes often fill up before Drabenstadt can get her 4-year-old daughter registered, and she frequently has to wait for materials to be sent from elsewhere. "It seems like a lot of the books I want have to come from the Central and Glenwood branches," said Drabenstadt, who often goes to the county's larger libraries. Elkridge residents have expressed similar complaints about their branch.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
The long-time director of the Baltimore County library system plans to retire next June, he announced Wednesday. James H. Fish has directed the 19-branch system since 1996. Library officials say his accomplishments include expanding hours, opening new facilities, introducing e-books and creating the Storyville "learning villages" for babies and young children. The library board of trustees plans to conduct a national search to replace Fish. In a statement, Fish said he approaches his retirement with mixed emotions.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | August 7, 2013
Alaina Grubb, 31, wanted to do something stimulating and fun with her young niece and nephew the other day, so she took them to the county library in Woodlawn. Seriously. The library. Specifically, the Arbutus woman took Hayden Grubb, 5, and her 4-year-old brother Lincoln to Storyville, an elaborate, interactive, "magical town" designed for young children from newborns to 5-year-olds. "It's great, a wonderful resource, and they love it," said Grubb, standing in the town's play kitchen watching Hayden arrange plastic pizza slices in a tray and Lincoln stack colorful dishes in a sink.
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