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By Christian Science Monitor | April 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Library of Congress is gearing up for an information revolution.The "goal is establishing a library without walls," proclaims Jacqueline Hess, the director of the Library of Congress's National Demonstration Lab.The library -- the largest in the world -- eventually wants to put much, if not all, of the 100 million items in its collection into digital, or computer, form. This could allow browsing through the library's stacks from afar by way of powerful information networks.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Karen A. Stuart, a Library of Congress archivist who earlier had been head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society where she also was associate editor of the Maryland Historical Magazine, died of cancer Aug. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 59. "As head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society, Karen always took her job seriously, trying hard to help researchers who sometimes had fairly arcane questions of projects," said Robert J. Brugger, an author and Maryland historian who is a senior editor at the Johns Hopkins University Press.
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NEWS
By Crystal Nix & Sheryll D. Cashin | May 28, 1993
AS LAW clerks to Justice Thurgood Marshall in his final two years at the Supreme Court, we are dismayed by the Library of Congress' indiscriminate release of Justice Marshall's court papers to the public. We are certain that his wishes have not been honored.In many separate conversations with us -- including during the fall of 1991, when Justice Marshall allegedly permitted full access to his papers upon his death -- Justice Marshall made clear how greatly he valued the confidentiality of the court's deliberations and that he had no intention of violating that ethic.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | June 26, 2012
The Library of Congress' new exhibition, Books That Shaped America, includes works by many notable American authors, but there is a gaping hole: Edgar Allen Poe. The list include no-brainers: classics from such greats as Herman Melville, Louisa May Alcott, Harper Lee, Ralph Ellison and William Faulkner. But not Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart” or  “The Fall of the House of Usher.” The list also has thoughtful choices such as "The Joy of Cooking" and "Our Bodies, Ourselves.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- I am at the Library of Congress to see which senators and representatives have checked out Madonna's new TC erotic best seller: "Sex."I know the Library of Congress recently purchased the book, because a federal employee, whom I shall call Elsie, tipped me to this a few days ago."The library got a call from Capitol Hill requesting the purchase of the book, and we did," Elsie said.But since the Library of Congress eventually gets a copy of every copyrighted book anyway, why did it have to go out and buy Madonna's book specially?
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Suddenly, the Supreme Court finds itself shorn of its inner secrets -- and powerless to do much about it.The justices, embarrassed over the decision of the Library of Congress to make public the late Justice Thurgood Marshall's files on cases as recent as 1991, threatened yesterday to deposit their papers somewhere else when they retire or die."I speak for a majority of the active justices of the court when I say that we are both surprised and disappointed by the library's decision to give unrestricted public access to Justice Thurgood Marshall's papers," Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist wrote to Librarian of Congress James H. Billington after the justices met in an extraordinary closed-door session.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Some of the best-preserved and least-viewed fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which have been objects of religious veneration and of venomous scholarly debate, will go on display at the Library of Congress in April, the first major American exhibition of the scrolls in a generation.The exhibition, proposed by a representative of the Israeli Antiquity Authority in December 1991, near the height of the furor over access to the documents, will include at least 11 major scroll fragments.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
In recent years, the Library of Congress has become increasingly crowded. Its librarians have been forced to move collections and double-shelve books to make room for new arrivals.But relief in the form of extra space should come soon -- at Fort Meade in western Anne Arundel County.The library and the office of the Architect of the Capitol have started to build storage facilities at the military base.Construction of the first storage module, along with its accompanying office space, loading docks, mechanical rooms, vestibule and circulation corridors, is scheduled to be complete next fall.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
The Library of Congress has put Howard County on the map. Or, more accurately, Howard County has put maps in the Library of Congress. The library, the country's largest, has requested maps made by two county cartographers for the permanent collection at its Geography and Mapping Unit. One map, which Department of Planning and Zoning cartographer Carrie Grosch created for the county's new General Plan, shows land-use policies in effect around the county. The other, by planning and zoning cartographer Michael White, shows the community and environmental features of a section of the U.S. 1 corridor.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
Fort Meade, seeking new tenants to replace departing soldiers, will become home to a large storage repository for the Library of Congress, which hopes to build a 12,000-square-foot warehouse on the post.Details of the project are slim, but Congress on Tuesday passed a military construction bill that includes an amendment appropriating $3.1 million for the project. The bill now awaits President Clinton's signature.A spokesman for the Library of Congress, Guy Lamolinara, said he had few details because planning is still in the preliminary stages.
TRAVEL
September 20, 2009
2009 National Book Festival Where: : National Mall, between Seventh and 14th streets in Washington When: : 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday What: : A slew of celebrity writers from John Irving to Jodi Picoult are scheduled to take part in this year's National Book Festival, organized by the Library of Congress to celebrate the joy of reading. Book signings take place throughout the day at pavilions dedicated to fiction, children, biography, poetry, mysteries and more. Authors expected to participate include James Patterson, Marilynne Robinson, Judy Blume, John Grisham, Junot Diaz, Colson Whitehead, Jeannette Walls and Julia Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
It's among the most iconic images of the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan are conferring at a table erected beneath a tent a few weeks after the Battle of Antietam. McClellan looks both weary and worried. He leans forward slightly as Lincoln leans back. It's easy to see who's in charge, and it's easy to see that McClellan - who was dismissed one month later as commander of the Army of the Potomac - has an inkling of what lay in store for him. That photo was taken by famed Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner.
NEWS
July 10, 2009
Senator owner lauded by theater group Senator Theatre owner Tom Kiefaber, whose financially troubled North Baltimore landmark is scheduled to go on the auction block in 12 days, is being lauded by the Theatre Historical Society of America for his devotion to the 70-year-old movie house. Karen Noonan, president of the society, said her group will be making a presentation to Kiefaber during its visit to the Senator, set for 1:45 p.m. today. In the 20 years since Kiefaber bought the Senator from his family's theater business, it has become a showpiece among the nation's few remaining single-screen theaters.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
The poet Josephine Jacobsen, in an essay she wrote for The Sun almost 30 years ago, decried how hard it was to get inside things that should be easy to open (milk cartons, aspirin bottles), yet how quickly Americans seemed to expect personal intimacy. Friendship, the Baltimore native wrote in her elegant way, should be a matter of "gradation - the stages by which acquaintance becomes congeniality, congeniality becomes intimacy. ... It is the flowering of long preparation." Jacobsen, the celebrated author of nine books of verse who once served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a position later renamed U.S. Poet Laureate)
FEATURES
December 24, 2007
Dec. 24 1851 Fire devastated the Library of Congress in Washington, destroying about 35,000 volumes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 2006
ATLANTA --After years of trying to sell the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s archives to a library or university, the King family will instead put them up for auction on June 30, Sotheby's announced yesterday. The sale, expected to bring $15 million to $30 million, will take place exactly five months after the death of Coretta Scott King, King's widow, who was keenly interested in finding an institutional home for the papers. The buyer will determine the future accessibility of the papers.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It has been a season of tumult for those who would guard the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. -- and things are only promising to get more contentious.This month, a federal commission approved a 4-acre site for a memorial on the Washington Mall to the slain civil rights leader, to take its place among the tributes to the nation's heroes.And a civil jury in Memphis sided with hotly disputed arguments made by the King family's lawyers, finding that a broad-gauged conspiracy was involved in his assassination.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
In recent years, the Library of Congress has become increasingly crowded. Its librarians have been forced to move collections and double-shelve books to make room for new arrivals.But relief in the form of extra space should come soon -- at Fort Meade in western Anne Arundel County.The library and the office of the Architect of the Capitol have started to build storage facilities at the military base.Construction of the first storage module, along with its accompanying office space, loading docks, mechanical rooms, vestibule and circulation corridors, is scheduled to be complete next fall.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2005
A young French damsel seems to be polishing Ben Franklin's bald pate with a feather duster in the hand-colored lithograph depicting his reception at the Court of France in 1778. But it's not a feather duster, says Gerard W. Gawalt, manuscript historian and curator of the exhibition, Ben Franklin: In His Own Words, which opens today at the Library of Congress. "It's supposed to be a laurel wreath," he says. The lithograph is among 75 items from the library's Ben Franklin Collection on display in celebration of Franklin's 300th birthday(on Jan. 17)
NEWS
By CHRIS LAMB | October 27, 2005
President Bush told Americans that the federal government will help rebuild the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast. Estimates put the cost at $200 billion. The administration already has spent $300 billion on the war in Iraq. To paraphrase the late Sen. Everett Dirksen: Two hundred billion dollars here and $300 billion there, and pretty soon you are talking real money. Despite strangling federal deficits, Mr. Bush vows he won't raise taxes. He says that he can pay off the country's debt by finding additional cuts in unnecessary spending.
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