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NEWS
By Luther Young | May 9, 1991
The Johns Hopkins University took unprecedented action yesterday to preserve old and valuable books in its Eisenhower Library by awarding a $40,000 contract for chemical treatment of deteriorating volumes printed on acid-based paper.The library agreed to ship 4,000 books during the next year to the Texas plant of Akzo Chemicals Inc. for "mass deacidification" with a chemical vapor that neutralizes the acid and could dramatically extend the life span of the 19th-century books to as much as 500 years.
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NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | March 31, 2014
While scouring tables for tome treasures during the annual Friends of Towson Library book sale April 10 to 13, buyers can hunt for something else of value this year: dragon eggs. Each egg entitles the finder to a free or discounted book. The eggs are the theoretical offspring of the Towson Dragon, the playable art creature adorning the library's former faux fish pond, which provides a whimsical environment for teaching literacy to youngsters. The eggs will be hidden among the thousands of gently used, donated fiction and nonfiction books, CDs and DVDs available at the Friends sale, which will be held in the building's downstairs Wilson and Towson meeting rooms, and which benefits the Towson branch.
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NEWS
October 31, 2000
THE FLAWED experiment to mix adult and children's books at North Carroll branch library abruptly ended last week in the wake of consistent public criticism. Let's hope this bad idea has been put to rest for good -- so the county's treasured library system can continue to provide the resources and service that make Carroll the statewide leader in library usage. Childhood values and assisted suicide. Puberty and passionate lovemaking. These were some of the topics of juxtaposed books that upset parents helping children to search for titles at the North Carroll branch over the past four months.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | February 1, 2014
Andrew Carnegie was a social Darwinian. He wanted to give the fittest the tools to rise to the top. Public libraries - as spreaders of skills, knowledge and culture - advanced his goal. Often hailed as Carnegie II, Bill Gates is if nothing else a champion of standardized testing and other forms of meritocracy. So here's a not-so-modest proposal for one of planet Earth's richest people, now worth around $78.5 billion. Update Carnegie's vision. Work toward a national digital library endowment, which, as I'll show, could boost K-12 test scores.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
When he noticed the overdue book at home, John J. Wolfe figured he'd better get it back to the Enoch Pratt Free Library . Wolfe, who lives in France, was already 64 years late in returning the book. He just hoped the library would waive the late fees. Luckily for Wolfe, Pratt officials were willing to make an exception. A World War II veteran, Wolfe, now 84 years old, was recuperating from surgery at Fort Meade when he visited the Central Library with other soldiers in early 1946.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Many Baltimore County elementary school pupils will be taking home more than their broken crayons and completed assignments on the last day of classes Friday. They'll also be carrying bags filled with books from their school libraries.Seeking to encourage reading over the summer, Baltimore County educators are urging children in kindergarten through fourth grade to borrow the books -- a new effort that highlights the district's increased emphasis on early reading skills."Instead of books being locked in school, why not have them in the hands of children?"
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 14, 1992
Aday on the presidential campaign trail:8 a.m. -- Addressing a breakfast meeting of the National Assn. of Librarians in Chicago, President Bush accuses Bill Clinton of holding a half-dozen overdue library books and of using an expired library card."
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
Charles W. Robinson envisions the day that Baltimore County residents can punch a few buttons on their home computer and have anything from a cat license to a census report spewing out of their printer.But until that day arrives, Mr. Robinson, director of the county library system, will settle for allowing residents to search for library books and cruise the Internet from their home computers.With little fanfare, Mr. Robinson's staff has opened up 14 telephone lines for computer users to sign onto the library's catalog system.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 1997
MOST OF US know all about how the dashing Pony Express was replaced by more modern technology such as the telegraph and trains.It seems that something of the opposite has occurred.For the past 20 years, library books and materials have been delivered to homebound county residents courtesy of the Care-A-Van.That trusty vehicle has been replaced by the U.S. mail in hopes of reaching more patrons.Any resident temporarily or permanently homebound by an illness, disability or injury is eligible for the free Library By Mail service.
NEWS
June 15, 1998
EMPTY SHELVES greet students who enter the library at Cross Country Elementary School in Northwest Baltimore. That school's plight, as outlined by Sun reporter Mike Bowler last week, is symptomatic of a school system and a city that have badly depleted a precious resource -- books -- that is absolutely critical if students are to succeed at learning to read.While Cross Country's desperate situation was caused by a flooded room and termites, other city schools reflect a lack of concern for libraries.
NEWS
sbrydell13@aol.com | April 8, 2013
Kevin Kallaugher (aka KAL) is the man behind the insightful and often acerbic political cartoons that have appeared in more than 100 publications worldwide, among which is our own Baltimore Sun. His work epitomizes the age-old adage that the "pen is mightier than the sword. " In one fell swoop, KAL can tie the tongue of President Obama, plaster a peace sign on the balding head of then Russian President Gorbachev, part the Red Sea with a dragon wearing a Star of David, reconfigure the politically precious Iowa campaign grounds into a snowball battle, along with poking fun at himself with a caricature of all the bizarre images that roam around in his head before they make their way onto paper.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
When he noticed the overdue book at home, John J. Wolfe figured he'd better get it back to the Enoch Pratt Free Library . Wolfe, who lives in France, was already 64 years late in returning the book. He just hoped the library would waive the late fees. Luckily for Wolfe, Pratt officials were willing to make an exception. A World War II veteran, Wolfe, now 84 years old, was recuperating from surgery at Fort Meade when he visited the Central Library with other soldiers in early 1946.
NEWS
March 13, 2005
The Savage branch library, 9525 Durness Lane, is offering an After School Book Club, for ages 11 and older, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday. The group will discuss Before We Were Free, by Julia Alvarez. The library's Third Wednesdays Book Club will discuss The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, by Andrew Solomon, at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Books are available at the branch. Information: 410-880-5980. A Checkers Club for ages 11 and older will be offered at the library from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 22, and April 5 and 19. No experience is necessary.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
It's an unusual assembly line - a row of 20 workers standing shoulder-to-shoulder at Baltimore's George Peabody Library, passing one another scores of 19th-century short stories, poems and literary essays from the likes of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The workers are refilling the stacks with 8,000 rare books that were nearly destroyed by water six months ago when a pipe leaked. The volumes have made a remarkable recovery, thanks to a process of freeze-dried restoration.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
Eldersburg library patrons could soon be taking out a cup of coffee with the latest John Grisham and Harry Potter novels. Carroll County Public Library is considering adding a vending machine area to the bustling South Carroll branch when a 3,000-square- foot expansion and renovation are complete. "The rule at libraries was always that you have to shush and you can't eat," said library director Linda Mielke, who presided over a recent library board meeting where the issue was discussed.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
THE FLAWED experiment to mix adult and children's books at North Carroll branch library abruptly ended last week in the wake of consistent public criticism. Let's hope this bad idea has been put to rest for good -- so the county's treasured library system can continue to provide the resources and service that make Carroll the statewide leader in library usage. Childhood values and assisted suicide. Puberty and passionate lovemaking. These were some of the topics of juxtaposed books that upset parents helping children to search for titles at the North Carroll branch over the past four months.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
For more than a decade, People for the American Way has been keeping track of attacks on children's books. Its most recent report will not take educators and librarians by surprise: Censorship is on the rise.During the 1992-1993 school year, People for the American Way reported 347 cases of attempted censorship. Forty-one percent of those attempts succeeded.This goes beyond news accounts of right-wingers burning biology books that mention evolution. It goes beyond Christian fundamentalists pulling their children out of public school because of literature used to teach sex education and drug abuse prevention.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 3, 1996
Today's little drama contains just enough mystery to invite the kind of speculation even humorless mugs find tempting and, ultimately, delicious. Today's question: What drives a man to return library books 22 years overdue, and to impose a stiff fine on himself?Sudden remorse? Sudden wealth? That Catholic guilt thing, brought on by too many viewings of "The Bells of St. Mary's"? Approaching death and a desire to clean the ledger? And who was this guy anyway? Bill Gates?Was he fulfilling penance ordered by a diocesan priest who'd heard the confession and thought Archbishop Spalding High could use a $3,200 donation?
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
Danielle Steel and Scott Turow are all wet. So are more than a thousand books by other novelists after a fire sprinkler malfunctioned in the Towson library yesterday minutes before the library opened, drenching the fiction shelves. "It just went off, a huge rush of water," said librarian Joe Thompson, who was standing near the fiction section putting books onto shelves when the sprinkler erupted. "I just stared for the first couple seconds." Thompson and other workers sprang into action, ripping books from the shelves and grabbing wastebaskets to bail the mounting pools of water.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 1999
READING IS fundamental, and not just for elementary schoolchildren, but for all ages. The Book Club at the Eldersburg branch library has been attracting a number of avid readers since its inception in February."
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