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NEWS
January 27, 2014
How wonderful it is that in these days of difficulty we have the Republicans to give us a good laugh. Do not let the Affordable Care Act pay for birth control pills because, according to Mike Huckabee, women cannot control their libido, but it is fine for ACA to pay for Viagra and Cialis ("Republican Mike Huckabee wades into the 'war on women,'" Jan. 23). Whose libido are we talking about now? Arlene Gordon, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
January 27, 2014
How wonderful it is that in these days of difficulty we have the Republicans to give us a good laugh. Do not let the Affordable Care Act pay for birth control pills because, according to Mike Huckabee, women cannot control their libido, but it is fine for ACA to pay for Viagra and Cialis ("Republican Mike Huckabee wades into the 'war on women,'" Jan. 23). Whose libido are we talking about now? Arlene Gordon, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992
HERE is something that the psychologists have so far neglected: the love of ugliness for its own sake, the lust to make the world intolerable. Its habitat is the United States. Out of the melting pot emerges a race which hates beauty as it hates truth. The etiology of this madness deserves a great deal more study than it has got. There must be causes behind it; it arises and flourishes in obedience to biological laws and not as a mere act of God. What, precisely, are the terms of those laws?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Low libido can not only ruin a women's sex life but could also cause her to miss out on some key health benefits. Dr. Valerie Omicioli, a certified menopause practitioner and clinical assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said that low sexual desire is something that women should not ignore. What are some of the common causes of low libido in women? The word libido refers not only to the desire for sex, but also sexual thoughts, fantasies, responsiveness and willingness to engage in sexual activity.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 18, 2004
In January I started taking birth control pills. Since then, I have not only gained weight, I've have also lost all desire to have sex. I am 22 years old and have been married for three years to a wonderful man. This is very frustrating for both of us. Could this be due to birth control pills? The effect of oral contraceptives on libido remains controversial. Some studies suggest that birth control pills might lower testosterone and diminish sexual desire. A study in chimpanzees showed lower levels of sexual activity when the females were given oral contraceptives.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 15, 2004
I am bombarded with ads and advice columns about help for low libido. I have the exact opposite problem, and I can't find any help. I am in my mid-40s, and I have such a high libido that it is causing problems in my marriage. Is there any kind of therapy, drug or herb that can lower libido? This problem is just as real and possibly more important to marriages than a lack of libido. The real problem is not so much high or low libido, but a mismatch between partners. For some individuals, making love once or twice a month is perfectly satisfactory, whereas others are disappointed if they don't have sex every other day. Sex therapy can be very helpful in such situations, as it allows the couple to discuss expectations and explore ways to create balance.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
ATLANTA - Scientists studying female sexuality have offered a possible biological explanation for the common complaint that oral contraceptive pills, used by one in four U.S. women at any given time, can dampen desire. Although the research is preliminary, two small studies presented here found that the pill reduces testosterone levels, which in turn may contribute to loss of libido. One researcher said the problem persists for some women even after they stop taking the pill. Low libido is the most frequent sexual complaint among U.S. women.
NEWS
By Chris Woolston and Chris Woolston,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The sex lives of men can seem like an Aesop's fable. As years go by and sexual desire fades, men may stop mating with an enthusiasm akin to rabbits and become more like red foxes, lonely animals who make do with one brief breeding season each year. The moral: Even if you're a happy rabbit now, don't take your sex life for granted. You could still turn into a fox. This tale is a warning, not a law of nature. Men can take steps to protect their sexual desires and abilities throughout their lives, says Jim Pfaus, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Concordia University in Montreal who studies the biology of libido.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 9, 2004
BOSTON - Let me see if I have this right. At one end of the sexual life cycle, we have pubescent teenagers so driven by biology that they can barely concentrate on physics. And what are we offering them? Abstinence. At the other end, we have their parents and grandparents whose sex drives have gone into low gear. What are we offering them? Viagra and Intrinsa. Is it just remotely possible that our society is suffering from a raging hormonal imbalance? We are trying to control the sex drive as if people were cars that needed to be equipped with the right set of brakes and an optional overdrive.
NEWS
By ALEX BEAM | February 8, 1993
Boston -- Perhaps this has happened to you: You are savoring one of those cunning ruminations on prosciutto in The Atlantic; suddenly your eye encounters an advertisement for the Xandria Collection, sensual products ''designed for both the timid and the bold.''Or you are leafing through a fascinating colloquium of Latin American poets in Harper's and your gaze wanders to an ad for Yellow Silk, the ''journal of erotic arts.'' Or for Libido, which has been billed as pornography ''for English majors.
NEWS
By Joseph R. Hughes | January 27, 2013
Here's a big question: When does old age begin? Will 30 years do it? Is being 50 and the holder of an AARP card with senior discounts enough? Both would be wrong guesses. Until recently, I hadn't thought much about it. Yet, I got the answer to this eminent question without asking. A while ago, I saw my physician for a semi-annual examination and health review. Near the end of our meeting, the doctor declared for the record that I had arrived at old age. Crash the cymbals and blare the trumpets!
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
In a second sex-related sanction by the state's highest court, an Arnold lawyer was ordered suspended from practice for two months for swapping Vicodin for sex. But three of the seven judges wanted at least a six-month suspension for Jeffrey S. Marcalus, with Judge Glenn T. Harrell Jr. writing for the minority that "Marcalus has some judgment shortcomings when it comes to acting out as his libido moves him." Marcalus was suspended briefly in 2007 for sexting and touching a client in a suggestive way, Harrell noted.
NEWS
By Chris Woolston and Chris Woolston,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The sex lives of men can seem like an Aesop's fable. As years go by and sexual desire fades, men may stop mating with an enthusiasm akin to rabbits and become more like red foxes, lonely animals who make do with one brief breeding season each year. The moral: Even if you're a happy rabbit now, don't take your sex life for granted. You could still turn into a fox. This tale is a warning, not a law of nature. Men can take steps to protect their sexual desires and abilities throughout their lives, says Jim Pfaus, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Concordia University in Montreal who studies the biology of libido.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Sex and headache are inextricably linked by the age-old excuse: "Not tonight, dear. I have a headache." But brain science is finding that it's more complicated than that. For many people, sex can turn a dull, throbbing pain into a raging headache. For a few who jump into bed feeling fine, orgasm can trigger a sudden headache. And for a minority of people, headaches are cured by a roll in the hay. Now a small pilot study exploring the link between migraines and libido suggests there might be a reward for headache pain.
NEWS
January 20, 2006
I was amused to hear that scientists have finally figured out that birth-control pills reduce a woman's sexual desire. I've known that for years. When I was younger, the effect wasn't as obvious, but in my 20s and 30s I knew that the pills really reduced my sex drive. I'm surprised that other women haven't figured out that the pill can affect libido. A new study of 124 women published in this month's issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine reveals how oral contraceptives might diminish sexual desire.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 9, 2004
BOSTON - Let me see if I have this right. At one end of the sexual life cycle, we have pubescent teenagers so driven by biology that they can barely concentrate on physics. And what are we offering them? Abstinence. At the other end, we have their parents and grandparents whose sex drives have gone into low gear. What are we offering them? Viagra and Intrinsa. Is it just remotely possible that our society is suffering from a raging hormonal imbalance? We are trying to control the sex drive as if people were cars that needed to be equipped with the right set of brakes and an optional overdrive.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN; King Features Syndicate | February 3, 2002
Q. You recently answered a woman who complained that her husband had lost all interest in sex. You suggested that low libido could be caused by many factors and recommended sex counseling. Your response might have been well-intentioned, but it was incomplete. I, too, was a middle-aged woman with a husband whose libido had diminished to near zero. He promised to see a doctor for a general checkup but put it off for five years. When he finally went in for a different problem, his doctor found a high PSA reading.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 28, 2001
Q.Thirty years ago when my daughter was making her first Holy Communion, I had a house full of guests. My head was splitting, and nothing helped. My sister-in-law told me to try a couple aspirins with a cup of coffee. I had tried everything else, so I took her advice. A few hours later she asked me how my headache was, and I realized the pain was gone. That's how I learned to combine aspirin and caffeine. A.Caffeine has been shown to boost pain relief from either aspirin or ibuprofen.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
GAITHERSBURG - A federal advisory panel yesterday threw cold water on Procter & Gamble's multimillion-dollar bid to market a skin patch designed to restore the sex drive of millions of women who have lost their ovaries to surgery. Although the Intrinsa testosterone patch offered a modest boost to the libido in the company's clinical trials, the 17-member FDA Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs voted unanimously to recommend that the agency deny approval until the company demonstrates that Intrinsa is safe for long-term use. Although its recommendations aren't binding, the agency generally follows the committee's advice.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
ATLANTA - Scientists studying female sexuality have offered a possible biological explanation for the common complaint that oral contraceptive pills, used by one in four U.S. women at any given time, can dampen desire. Although the research is preliminary, two small studies presented here found that the pill reduces testosterone levels, which in turn may contribute to loss of libido. One researcher said the problem persists for some women even after they stop taking the pill. Low libido is the most frequent sexual complaint among U.S. women.
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