Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiberty Tree
IN THE NEWS

Liberty Tree

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
The Liberty Tree, a tulip poplar at St. John's College that is 400 or so years old, is ailing.At the urging of a state forester, campus officials have called tree experts to examine what they believe is frost damage to young leaves, said school spokeswoman Barbara Goyette. Growth since the frost at the beginning of the month is fine, Ms. Goyette said.Gene A. Piotrowski, associate director of urban forestry with the Maryland Forest Service, noticed leaf damage all the way up the tree as he passed by last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun Reporter | March 31, 2007
Taking the place of a now-vanished Revolutionary War symbol is a tall order, especially in a town like Annapolis, where some people talk about "the signers" of the Declaration of Independence as if they were old friends. But yesterday, a second Liberty Tree was planted on the St. John's College campus at the site of the original Annapolis Liberty Tree, which was damaged in a storm and cut down in 1999. Colonial patriots -- and future signers -- known as the Sons of Liberty once met under the old tulip poplar's boughs to plot against the British crown.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun Reporter | March 31, 2007
Taking the place of a now-vanished Revolutionary War symbol is a tall order, especially in a town like Annapolis, where some people talk about "the signers" of the Declaration of Independence as if they were old friends. But yesterday, a second Liberty Tree was planted on the St. John's College campus at the site of the original Annapolis Liberty Tree, which was damaged in a storm and cut down in 1999. Colonial patriots -- and future signers -- known as the Sons of Liberty once met under the old tulip poplar's boughs to plot against the British crown.
NEWS
April 8, 2005
A windstorm in April 1975 was not kind to a fragile piece of American history. Almost 200 years after the American Revolution, a living link to that age - the Liberty Tree on the St. John's College campus in Annapolis - was about to snap. The 400-year-old tulip poplar, under which the Sons of Liberty are supposed to have gathered during the Revolution, had developed a 4-foot crack near its top several years earlier. The crack opened up 1.5 inches farther when battered by the 60 mph winds.
NEWS
April 8, 2005
A windstorm in April 1975 was not kind to a fragile piece of American history. Almost 200 years after the American Revolution, a living link to that age - the Liberty Tree on the St. John's College campus in Annapolis - was about to snap. The 400-year-old tulip poplar, under which the Sons of Liberty are supposed to have gathered during the Revolution, had developed a 4-foot crack near its top several years earlier. The crack opened up 1.5 inches farther when battered by the 60 mph winds.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
An Annapolis landscaper is preparing to sell what he claims are chunks of one of Maryland's most revered symbols of freedom -- the Liberty Tree cut down last month on the St. John's College campus.Mark Mehnert, 30, said he was flabbergasted to find remnants of the storied tree in landfill and recycling facilities that turn dead trees into mulch.The pieces he has recovered include two hunks of trunk with the "GO NAVY" sign vandals spray-painted on the tree before the 400-year-old tulip poplar was cut down Oct. 25."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
They came from as far as Boston, Richmond, Va., and Harrisburg, Pa. As near as Towson, Baltimore and a couple of blocks away.With the backdrop of Revolutionary War re-enactors and a fife and drum band, dignitaries from the 13 states that were America's original colonies, Maryland research scientists and more than 100 onlookers gathered yesterday under Annapolis' storied Liberty Tree as their forefathers did centuries ago.But this time they were taking part...
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
After weeks of agonizing discussion, St. John's College officials decided yesterday to take down the school's wind-damaged 400-year-old Liberty Tree, the last of the original 13 under which colonists gathered to kindle revolutionary fervor in the 1770s.St. John's officials had been debating the fate of the historic tree on the college's front lawn since Hurricane Floyd blew through town last month, ripping a 15-foot-long crack in its trunk and weakening a large branch that leaned precariously toward a dormitory.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
The nation's last Liberty Tree is taking on a whole new life in death. Felled in October after a summer hurricane damaged it beyond saving, the historic tree that once stood in Maryland's capital is about to become a music-maker instead of a money drain for the Annapolis man on a mission to save its remains. Taylor Guitars, producer of high-end acoustic guitars, plans to turn 30,000 pounds of Liberty Tree wood into a limited edition series of the instruments. The company, based near San Diego, will buy the wood for $78,000, allowing the landscaper who salvaged the tree parts from dumps to recover his expenses and keep the rest of the wood -- a little less than 30,000 pounds -- as he continues to scout for other uses.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- This is moving day for one of the last known descendants of the famed Liberty Tree of Annapolis. The 45-foot tulip poplar, planted in 1978 on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, has been wrenched from the earth and loaded onto a truck. And late this afternoon, the tree's 24-foot-wide base is to be eased into a new hole, just far enough way to escape the bulldozers that are due here next spring to begin work on an underground visitors center. At 100 tons of tree, root and soil, the Liberty seedling is the largest and last of eight Memorial Trees on the Capitol grounds that are being painstakingly moved.
NEWS
May 9, 2002
State officials accept seedling descendant of Liberty Tree A 2-foot-tall tulip poplar seedling propagated from the Liberty Tree, which once sheltered Colonial revolutionaries in Annapolis, was presented to state officials yesterday, starting a plan to give Liberty Tree offspring to each of the original 13 states and Washington. The seedling, accepted by Natural Resources Secretary J. Charles Fox at the State House, was one of 14 that the nonprofit American Forests was able to propagate from about 10,000 seeds it received from landscaper Mark Mehnert, who salvaged Liberty Tree wood from two recycling centers.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
Once, American colonists plotted revolution beneath its boughs. Now guitar enthusiasts will be able to plunk out patriotic tunes on instruments made from its felled trunk. The remains of the last standing American Liberty Tree, taken down in Annapolis in October 1999 after being damaged by a hurricane, have found a second life in the bodies of 400 custom-made guitars fashioned by a California maker. Eight of them - all spoken for - returned to Maryland last week to be sold by the Catonsville music shop owner who helped bring the guitar maker and the historic lumber together.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- This is moving day for one of the last known descendants of the famed Liberty Tree of Annapolis. The 45-foot tulip poplar, planted in 1978 on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, has been wrenched from the earth and loaded onto a truck. And late this afternoon, the tree's 24-foot-wide base is to be eased into a new hole, just far enough way to escape the bulldozers that are due here next spring to begin work on an underground visitors center. At 100 tons of tree, root and soil, the Liberty seedling is the largest and last of eight Memorial Trees on the Capitol grounds that are being painstakingly moved.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - Tall, straight and sturdy, the child of America's last Liberty Tree has thrived at the symbolic heart of the government formed by the revolutionaries who plotted beneath the boughs of its fallen ancestor. Planted as a scrawny seedling on the U.S. Capitol grounds more than two decades ago to mark the nation's 200th birthday, the tulip poplar now soars nearly 40 feet high, measures almost 20 inches across its trunk and will soon blossom into its signature blooms. But the tree's robust growth could spell its doom.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
If there's a central theme linking the remarkably diverse musical interests of singer, guitarist and conductor Joel Cohen, it is that music reveals the spirit of a people and a time more vividly than anything else. On the Erato recording label, Cohen and his 11-member consort of singers and players called the Boston Camerata have explored such fascinating topics as the liturgical intimacy shared by Christians and Jews of the Middle Ages ("The Sacred Bridge," 1990); the spiritual aspirations of the 18th-century American Psalter ("The American Vocalist," 1992)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 2000
Two hundred and twenty-four years ago this past Tuesday, 56 leaders of Great Britain's American colonies pledged to posterity their lives, fortunes and sacred honor as they signed the great declaration that invented the United States of America. Thirteen years and several days later, a Parisian mob whose anger at an unjust monarchy had reached critical mass headed toward the 80-foot walls of the Bastille in search of gunpowder, prisoners to free and, most of all, a target for their frustration with the old regime.
NEWS
October 20, 1999
THE LIBERTY BELL remains a powerful symbol of American independence in spite of its famous fracture. Maryland's Liberty Tree, another mighty symbol that has suffered a crack, also will survive -- though not in its current form.Hurricane Floyd delivered a fatal blow to the giant tulip poplar a month ago, accomplishing what the redcoats could not when they cut down sister trees in the 12 other colonies during the American Revolution.Arborists have concluded that the damage to the already stressed 97-foot tree was too severe, and it will have to come down.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
The nation's last Liberty Tree is taking on a whole new life in death. Felled in October after a summer hurricane damaged it beyond saving, the historic tree that once stood in Maryland's capital is about to become a music-maker instead of a money drain for the Annapolis man on a mission to save its remains. Taylor Guitars, producer of high-end acoustic guitars, plans to turn 30,000 pounds of Liberty Tree wood into a limited edition series of the instruments. The company, based near San Diego, will buy the wood for $78,000, allowing the landscaper who salvaged the tree parts from dumps to recover his expenses and keep the rest of the wood - a little less than 30,000 pounds - as he continues to scout for other uses.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.