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NEWS
July 23, 2003
A LEADING REBEL group's declaration of a cease-fire yesterday seemingly offers one last chance for Liberia. This truce, after days of fierce shelling, is a godsend that should be used to prevent that West African country from further self-destruction. Two things must now follow in short order to make the announced cease-fire stick: An international peacekeeping force -- mostly from neighboring West African countries but under the auspices of the United Nations and the United States -- must be quickly landed in Liberia to supervise the truce.
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NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
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NEWS
By SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
WHEN HE RESIGNED as Liberia's president Aug. 11 and exited his bleeding country, Charles Taylor pledged to return. That, unfortunately, was no empty threat. He now keeps running his homeland from an opulent Nigerian villa, barking orders on his cell phone to a network of enforcers. "He is like a vampire," observes Jacques Klein, the United Nations' top representative for Liberia. "Until you drive a stake in his heart, he won't die." Mr. Taylor's mischief must be stopped. If he is allowed to continue giving telephone orders to his military commanders and interim President Moses Blah, the Liberian peace process may derail even before the scheduled Oct. 14 installation of a new government.
NEWS
By Marion Subah | August 19, 2014
Monrovia, Liberia - We sat in a waiting room of a health clinic here, talking about our fears. As a midwifery and nursing educator working in Liberia for Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins University affiliate, I had been asked to help update health workers on the critical skills and interventions essential to managing Ebola cases. I was prepared to talk about the disease - what it is, how to care for patients and how to prevent it from spreading. But before I could do that, I knew we had to talk about how terrifying the job is. A nurse sitting across from me spoke candidly about his first experience with an Ebola patient - he didn't want to have any physical contact with the person, he was so terrified.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
THE LONG-OVERDUE resignation and exit of President Charles Taylor offers a short window of opportunity for Liberia to regain stability and peace. The United States and the rest of the international community should use it to prevent the West African country from sliding into a new nightmare of suffering. Any hesitation at this point will only aggravate a dangerous power vacuum. Fourteen years of constant turmoil have torn apart Liberia's social fabric. Key institutions are in a shambles.
NEWS
December 2, 1992
The United Nations Security Council moved a step toward accepting the role of subduing anarchy within a nation by calling the fighting in Liberia "a serious threat to international peace and security."Liberia's neighbors in West Africa sought the resolution, which clamps an embargo on arms to Liberian belligerents similar to those on Iraq and Yugoslavia. The embargo is pointed at Libya, which has provided Charles Taylor with training and arms. The resolution exempts and supports the 15,000-man force of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)
NEWS
August 20, 2003
IF LIBERIA'S peace deal is to succeed, it will require a new spirit of cooperation among the country's power brokers. Civil institutions must be rebuilt, new coalitions formed. Unless this happens, the transitional government, which is to replace the current caretaker president, Moses Blah, won't be able to function. Fifty-one percent of the 76-member top administration is required to approve any action it takes, and no single faction can hope to muster such a majority without seeking consensus and compromise.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
The cease-fire in Liberia, although imperfectly observed for a month, offers hope of returning food distribution and public health services to the capital, Monrovia, where 80 percent of the children are malnourished. It is not clear who won the civil war. The people of Liberia lost.The cease-fire left the rebel group led by Charles Taylor in control of most of the country, with the greatest claim to a share of power. It left Prince Johnson's rival group dominant in Monrovia, forces loyal to the murdered President Samuel Doe still intact, and the army of five neighboring countries in the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)
NEWS
April 14, 1994
An end to Liberia's four-year civil war may be in sight. Peace-keeping armies of Liberia's West African neighbors have begun disarming some 60,000 rebel rabble who have been raping and pillaging the countryside but are now gathering in designated areas under the eyes of United Nations observers. A five-member government representing the main political-guerrilla factions began operations, the sticking points mediated by former President Canaan Banana of Zimbabwe.These measures -- actually negotiated last July and just now being implemented -- postpone the question of who will wield power.
NEWS
July 4, 2003
IT'S DIFFICULT to see how President Bush could have a successful five-country tour of Africa next week if he first disregards the continent's urgent pleas to send U.S. troops to Liberia. Without action, his speeches about responsibility and leadership would sound like outright hypocrisy. The White House spent much of yesterday trying to create preconditions for a limited involvement. The United States wants to avoid casualties; it also insists on a clear cutoff date for its lead part in a larger multinational peacekeeping mission.
SPORTS
By Brian Paxton, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Three banners hang from the wall in the wrestling room at Kenwood. One lists the school's state champions, another honors the school's Baltimore County champions and a third commemorates a junior varsity county championship. At first, that third banner embarrassed Nyonbou "Boo" Farley. He doesn't like to call attention to himself. But two years later, he knows how much it means. After finishing second in the Baltimore County championships last week, Farley's 30-2 record in the 160-pound weight class earned him the top seed in this weekend's Class 4A-3A North regional tournament with a chance to earn a berth in the state championship on March 1-2 at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2011
Irene Bennett Reid, a retired social worker who was the mother of former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, died of lung cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. She was 78 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. Mrs. Reid was also the stepmother of the Rev. Frank M. Reid III, pastor of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. "You watched your grammar when you spoke to her," said Mr. Schmoke, who is dean of the Howard University School of Law. "She was an old-fashioned school marm, but was also an inspiring person.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella | November 9, 2008
Edith Johns felt lucky that she rarely got sick and never faced big medical expenses. But in August, while running to catch a bus in Baltimore, she tripped and broke her foot. Her doctor bills came to more than $1,000. Johns, 55, has been without full-time work since December, when she said she was laid off after four years as a file clerk at Russel Motor Cars in Catonsville. Since then she has been without medical insurance. "After you lose your job, they sent me something about COBRA," health insurance for the unemployed, she said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | August 28, 2007
Maryland entered a "sister states" agreement with two counties in Liberia yesterday in hopes that the state's 19th-century role in founding the African republic can be translated into a 21st-century role in sparking its economic development. The West African nation is looking to rebuild now that dictator Charles Taylor has been replaced with a democratically elected president, and officials say they are eager for Maryland to be a partner. "Let me hasten to inform you that Liberia is rich in culture and natural resources," Bong County Superintendent Ranney B. Jackson said during a ceremony yesterday outside Gov. Martin O'Malley's office.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | May 20, 2007
HARBEL, Liberia -- They come in broad daylight, with guns, machetes, knives and buckets of acid. The invaders of Bridgestone Firestone North American Tire's rubber plantation in Liberia are hunting what they call "elephant meat": To them, the company is so big that anyone can take a hunk of flesh and no one will notice. Some people who stand in their way get hacked to death. Acid has been hurled on the faces and bodies of others. During 14 years of civil war in Liberia, the plundering of plantations and other assets became so common that the country was brought to its knees.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 16, 2006
CHICAGO -- A reporter asked Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf why she had come to America. She responded with five words that open doors, launch jetliners and move motorcades almost everywhere on the planet: "I was invited by Oprah." Of course, it is important to note that Ms. Sirleaf also was drawn by a humanitarian mission. She brought with her Musu Gertee, a 9-year-old Liberian girl who was fitted with a prosthetic replacement for the right arm and hand she lost in a rocket attack three years ago. Oprah Winfrey's staff alerted Ms. Sirleaf's government to Musu after the child was featured last year in a Chicago Tribune report about Liberia's young war victims.
NEWS
By ROBYN DIXON AND HANS NICHOLS and ROBYN DIXON AND HANS NICHOLS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2006
FREETOWN, Sierra Leone -- Unshaven and looking haggard, Africa's most wanted war criminal, former Liberian President Charles Taylor, was placed in a detention cell at the United Nations war crimes tribunal in Sierra Leone yesterday after his early-morning arrest while trying to flee Nigeria carrying large bags of cash. A U.N. helicopter carrying Taylor landed in the compound of the U.N. Special Court in Freetown. Taylor, handcuffed and wearing a bulletproof vest over a white tunic, stepped out and was bundled into a four-wheel-drive vehicle and driven about 100 yards to the door of the detention center.
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