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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 1999
TOKYO -- Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders yesterday to get parliament moving on guidelines enabling Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the region.But long-stalled action on the guidelines -- which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament -- is elusive.Japan's "peace constitution" contains a clause renouncing war, although the country maintains the Self-Defense Forces for "exclusively defensive" purposes.
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NEWS
November 14, 2012
Joshua Shoemaker's letter to the editor ("Time to afford all a 'fair chance,'" Nov. 12) quotes Abraham Lincoln explaining how the role of government is "to elevate the condition of men - to lift artificial weights from all shoulders - to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all - to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life. " President Lincoln's eloquence and humanity are hauntingly echoed by another man for the ages and master of the language who said, "We want to draw a line below which we will not allow persons to live and labor, yet above which they may compete with all the strength of their manhood.
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NEWS
November 14, 2012
Joshua Shoemaker's letter to the editor ("Time to afford all a 'fair chance,'" Nov. 12) quotes Abraham Lincoln explaining how the role of government is "to elevate the condition of men - to lift artificial weights from all shoulders - to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all - to afford all an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life. " President Lincoln's eloquence and humanity are hauntingly echoed by another man for the ages and master of the language who said, "We want to draw a line below which we will not allow persons to live and labor, yet above which they may compete with all the strength of their manhood.
NEWS
By HARTFORD COURANT | May 12, 2005
Canada premier sets confidence vote; foes demand resignation TORONTO - Prime Minister Paul Martin said yesterday that a vote of confidence in his scandal-rocked government would be held May 19, but his opponents demanded he resign immediately and vowed to obstruct Parliament until the vote is held. The opposition accused him of delaying the vote, saying he was using a visit by Queen Elizabeth II as a tactic to put it off. Martin's minority government has been paralyzed for months by verbal brawls over a corruption scandal within his Liberal Party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 1998
TOKYO -- Politics took a turn to the usual here yesterday as the governing Liberal Democratic Party opted for political expedience and agreed to form a coalition with its archenemy, Ichiro Ozawa, and his Liberal Party.The alliance will strengthen the governing party's sway in Parliament, mollify its restive hard-liners and give it sure support in coming budget debates."I am happy that we have agreed to work together on various policies with strong cooperation in the parliamentary session and on the 1999 budget discussion," said Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, who signed the deal with Ozawa after 3 1/2 hours of talks yesterday.
NEWS
By HARTFORD COURANT | May 12, 2005
Canada premier sets confidence vote; foes demand resignation TORONTO - Prime Minister Paul Martin said yesterday that a vote of confidence in his scandal-rocked government would be held May 19, but his opponents demanded he resign immediately and vowed to obstruct Parliament until the vote is held. The opposition accused him of delaying the vote, saying he was using a visit by Queen Elizabeth II as a tactic to put it off. Martin's minority government has been paralyzed for months by verbal brawls over a corruption scandal within his Liberal Party.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 1, 1994
MONTREAL -- In just two weeks, the predominantly French-speaking inhabitants of Quebec will vent their frustration and fury at the rest of Canada in provincial elections that may mark the beginning of the end for the 127-year-old confederation of 10 provinces.There is little doubt about the outcome of the Sept. 12 elections for the provincial parliament, known as the National Assembly. Every poll, nearly every pundit and most foreign diplomatic observers predict that Quebecers will give the staunchly federalist Liberal Party the heave-ho and return the secessionist Parti Quebecois to power after nine years in the political wilderness.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
WHEN Prime Minister Jean Chretien steps down as Canada's leader tomorrow, his departure won't be lamented by many politicians north or south of the U.S. border. In Canada, the combative, imperious Liberal Party chief who assumed office in 1993 is widely viewed as having long overstayed his welcome. His canny understanding of power politics and his street-fighter stubbornness - and a long-splintered opposition - allowed Mr. Chretien to hold on despite criticisms of patronage abuses, ethical laxity within his Cabinet and waning public popularity.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- Britain is moving into the final stage of one of the tightest electoral campaigns in its modern history, with the Labor Party holding a slight lead in the polls over the incumbent Conservatives.Three of four polls published in today's major newspapers gave Labor a two-point lead over the Conservatives. Only one, a poll in the Sunday Telegraph, showed the parties even.The apprehension now is that Thursday's election will produce a hung Parliament, with none of the parties having the necessary 326-seat majority in the House of Commons to govern on its own.Thus, Paddy Ashdown, leader of the smallest of the three major parties, the Liberal Democrats, has assumed an uncommon and unexpected importance.
NEWS
October 22, 1993
An editorial yesterday misspelled the names of two Canadian political party leaders. The leader of the Reform Party is Preston Manning. The leader of the New Democrats is Audrey McLaughlin.The Sun regrets the errors.No majority of the 295 seats in the House of Commons is expected to emerge from the federal election in Canada Monday. More's the pity. The Liberal Party, which championed a bilingual, multi-cultural Canada during the prime ministry of Pierre Elliott Trudeau in the 1970s, is poised to return under the less charismatic Jean Chretien.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
WHEN Prime Minister Jean Chretien steps down as Canada's leader tomorrow, his departure won't be lamented by many politicians north or south of the U.S. border. In Canada, the combative, imperious Liberal Party chief who assumed office in 1993 is widely viewed as having long overstayed his welcome. His canny understanding of power politics and his street-fighter stubbornness - and a long-splintered opposition - allowed Mr. Chretien to hold on despite criticisms of patronage abuses, ethical laxity within his Cabinet and waning public popularity.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 2000
JERUSALEM-Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak prevented his government from collapsing last night, but only by increasing the power of his most demanding coalition partner, the ultra-Orthodox Shas party. The end of Israel's latest government crisis neared when the liberal Meretz Party decided to give up its seats in Barak's Cabinet while continuing to back Barak's coalition on parliamentary votes. As often happens in Israeli politics, the crisis was not over the peace process, which commands so much attention from the outside world.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 1999
TOKYO -- Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders yesterday to get parliament moving on guidelines enabling Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the region.But long-stalled action on the guidelines -- which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament -- is elusive.Japan's "peace constitution" contains a clause renouncing war, although the country maintains the Self-Defense Forces for "exclusively defensive" purposes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 1998
TOKYO -- Politics took a turn to the usual here yesterday as the governing Liberal Democratic Party opted for political expedience and agreed to form a coalition with its archenemy, Ichiro Ozawa, and his Liberal Party.The alliance will strengthen the governing party's sway in Parliament, mollify its restive hard-liners and give it sure support in coming budget debates."I am happy that we have agreed to work together on various policies with strong cooperation in the parliamentary session and on the 1999 budget discussion," said Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, who signed the deal with Ozawa after 3 1/2 hours of talks yesterday.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | July 8, 1995
Should a political party craving power be true to its hardest-working loyalists, who are usually on the ideological frontier? Or should it cater to the throng of uncommitted voters in the center who grant or withhold office?Conservative Members of Parliament decided that question in Britain, this week, on the side of moderation, stability and the broad center.They must expect to lose the next election, by mid-1997, anyway. The struggle for the soul of the party was really about how badly to lose, and how long to remain in the wilderness afterward.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 1, 1994
MONTREAL -- In just two weeks, the predominantly French-speaking inhabitants of Quebec will vent their frustration and fury at the rest of Canada in provincial elections that may mark the beginning of the end for the 127-year-old confederation of 10 provinces.There is little doubt about the outcome of the Sept. 12 elections for the provincial parliament, known as the National Assembly. Every poll, nearly every pundit and most foreign diplomatic observers predict that Quebecers will give the staunchly federalist Liberal Party the heave-ho and return the secessionist Parti Quebecois to power after nine years in the political wilderness.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | July 8, 1995
Should a political party craving power be true to its hardest-working loyalists, who are usually on the ideological frontier? Or should it cater to the throng of uncommitted voters in the center who grant or withhold office?Conservative Members of Parliament decided that question in Britain, this week, on the side of moderation, stability and the broad center.They must expect to lose the next election, by mid-1997, anyway. The struggle for the soul of the party was really about how badly to lose, and how long to remain in the wilderness afterward.
NEWS
By ALEXANDRA MARKS | May 16, 1993
Asuncion, Paraguay.-- A mix of anticipation and concern swept through the press room at the Guarani Hotel in Asuncion last Sunday. After a full day of relatively calm and orderly balloting in Paraguay's first, fully democratic elections, it appeared someone was trying to sabotage the process.The phone lines to the only independent source of poll results had been cut at noon. Despite a request from election observer and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, they still were not working four hours after the polls had closed.
NEWS
October 22, 1993
An editorial yesterday misspelled the names of two Canadian political party leaders. The leader of the Reform Party is Preston Manning. The leader of the New Democrats is Audrey McLaughlin.The Sun regrets the errors.No majority of the 295 seats in the House of Commons is expected to emerge from the federal election in Canada Monday. More's the pity. The Liberal Party, which championed a bilingual, multi-cultural Canada during the prime ministry of Pierre Elliott Trudeau in the 1970s, is poised to return under the less charismatic Jean Chretien.
NEWS
By ALEXANDRA MARKS | May 16, 1993
Asuncion, Paraguay.-- A mix of anticipation and concern swept through the press room at the Guarani Hotel in Asuncion last Sunday. After a full day of relatively calm and orderly balloting in Paraguay's first, fully democratic elections, it appeared someone was trying to sabotage the process.The phone lines to the only independent source of poll results had been cut at noon. Despite a request from election observer and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, they still were not working four hours after the polls had closed.
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