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NEWS
August 24, 1997
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common decency.- H.L. Mencken"Travails," The Evening SunEducation, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises to the foolish, their lack of understanding.- Ambrose Bierce"The Devil's Dictionary."Soap and education are not as sudden as massacre, but they are often more deadly in the long run.- Mark Twain"Sketches New and Old"What does education often do?
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NEWS
By Michael McGuire | June 12, 2013
When they left me outside my freshman dorm in the fall of 2009, my parents told me I could do anything. It was a wonderful compliment, a sign of confidence that made me feel just a little less guilty for the substantial investment they were making for me in a private liberal arts education. But a month or so later, when I sat down with my adviser, I realized doing "anything" wasn't an option. I had to decide on something: a major. I needed to choose a path to follow for the rest of my time at Washington and Lee. A lot of my friends already knew what their something was, and they directed four years of classes and internships toward being investment bankers in New York City or campaign managers in Alabama.
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NEWS
March 3, 2013
Aspects of recent debates about the value of a liberal arts education, its usefulness and its appropriateness strike a familiar and disturbing historical chord. Our nation's brightest students, contemplating the dedication of four years to the highest level of cognitive challenge, are discouraged by a contingent of their elders and asked to consider something more practical. "A liberal education won't prepare you for a job," the student is told. "What can you do with a degree in philosophy?
NEWS
June 1, 2013
St. Mary's College alumni are currently aware of the "crisis" in admissions, which is unfortunate and reflects a number of factors, including the admissions strategy of the new college president as well as the changing nature and economics of higher education. While this situation works itself out they are right to express concern over St. Mary's future. However, to suggest, as commentator Anne D. Neal does, that St. Mary's does not deserve to survive because of the kind of education it offers or because its curriculum is somehow inadequate, reflects a serious misunderstanding of a public liberal arts education and what the college means to its students and alumni ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30)
NEWS
January 23, 2005
H. Bentley Glass, 98, a former Johns Hopkins University biologist who in the 1950s and 1960s led a provocative life as a writer, scientific policy-maker and theorist, died of pneumonia Jan. 16 at a hospital in Boulder, Colo. His death the day before his 99th birthday followed his prediction in 1967 that people in the 21st century would live to nearly 100, said his daughter, Lois Edgar of Boulder. His most influential scientific accomplishment was his work, begun at Hopkins, on what he called genetic drift.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
St. Mary's College alumni are currently aware of the "crisis" in admissions, which is unfortunate and reflects a number of factors, including the admissions strategy of the new college president as well as the changing nature and economics of higher education. While this situation works itself out they are right to express concern over St. Mary's future. However, to suggest, as commentator Anne D. Neal does, that St. Mary's does not deserve to survive because of the kind of education it offers or because its curriculum is somehow inadequate, reflects a serious misunderstanding of a public liberal arts education and what the college means to its students and alumni ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30)
NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Thousands of miles away, in the mountainous capital of the historically conflict-ridden country of Georgia, there sits a college that was recently founded on the pedagogic principles of a single institution - Annapolis' St. John's College. The Organization for Liberal Education in Georgia, a student group at the Annapolis school, will be host for a jazz benefit Saturday to raise money for a summer trip to the New Gelati Academy in Tbilisi, Georgia. The proceeds will pay for a group of students and teachers from St. John's to travel to the 10-month-old college and help establish a learning environment modeled after St. John's College, which emphasizes independent thought and intimate class discussions on Western literature.
NEWS
By Michael McGuire | June 12, 2013
When they left me outside my freshman dorm in the fall of 2009, my parents told me I could do anything. It was a wonderful compliment, a sign of confidence that made me feel just a little less guilty for the substantial investment they were making for me in a private liberal arts education. But a month or so later, when I sat down with my adviser, I realized doing "anything" wasn't an option. I had to decide on something: a major. I needed to choose a path to follow for the rest of my time at Washington and Lee. A lot of my friends already knew what their something was, and they directed four years of classes and internships toward being investment bankers in New York City or campaign managers in Alabama.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 31, 1993
From The Sun Jan. 31-Feb. 6, 1843Jan. 31: We have no confirmation of the rumor that a large portion of the Texas army has been captured by the Mexicans.Feb. 3: Three-fifths of all the insane persons in the lunatic asylums in the United States are said to be bachelors and old maids.From The Sun Jan. 31-Feb. 6, 1893Feb. 3: All the wells except two on Lyman Avenue, Govanstown, have gone dry on account of the long dry spell in the fall and early part of the winter.Feb. 6: The new buildings of the Home of the Feeble-Minded, at Owings Mills, Md., have been so far extended and equipped as to be capable of accomodating about seventy-five children.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
Sometimes, the term "liberal" has a positive connotation. To liberate is to set free. A liberal education gives one a broad cultural background. But in Republican primaries, using the L-word is tantamount to calling your opponent a disease-ridden, ferret-faced goon - only the latter is a much nicer way of saying it. Presidential front-runners John McCain, the hawkish anti-abortion U.S. senator from Arizona, and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney actively...
NEWS
March 3, 2013
Aspects of recent debates about the value of a liberal arts education, its usefulness and its appropriateness strike a familiar and disturbing historical chord. Our nation's brightest students, contemplating the dedication of four years to the highest level of cognitive challenge, are discouraged by a contingent of their elders and asked to consider something more practical. "A liberal education won't prepare you for a job," the student is told. "What can you do with a degree in philosophy?
NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Thousands of miles away, in the mountainous capital of the historically conflict-ridden country of Georgia, there sits a college that was recently founded on the pedagogic principles of a single institution - Annapolis' St. John's College. The Organization for Liberal Education in Georgia, a student group at the Annapolis school, will be host for a jazz benefit Saturday to raise money for a summer trip to the New Gelati Academy in Tbilisi, Georgia. The proceeds will pay for a group of students and teachers from St. John's to travel to the 10-month-old college and help establish a learning environment modeled after St. John's College, which emphasizes independent thought and intimate class discussions on Western literature.
NEWS
January 23, 2005
H. Bentley Glass, 98, a former Johns Hopkins University biologist who in the 1950s and 1960s led a provocative life as a writer, scientific policy-maker and theorist, died of pneumonia Jan. 16 at a hospital in Boulder, Colo. His death the day before his 99th birthday followed his prediction in 1967 that people in the 21st century would live to nearly 100, said his daughter, Lois Edgar of Boulder. His most influential scientific accomplishment was his work, begun at Hopkins, on what he called genetic drift.
NEWS
August 24, 1997
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common decency.- H.L. Mencken"Travails," The Evening SunEducation, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises to the foolish, their lack of understanding.- Ambrose Bierce"The Devil's Dictionary."Soap and education are not as sudden as massacre, but they are often more deadly in the long run.- Mark Twain"Sketches New and Old"What does education often do?
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 8, 1992
CHICAGO -- Allan Bloom, the University of Chicago professor who wrote the highly acclaimed 1987 book "The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students," has died.Dr. Bloom, who was 62, died yesterday at the university's Bernard Mitchell Hospital. The cause of death, according to school officials, was peptic ulcer bleeding, complicated by liver failure.His friend Saul Bellow, the Nobel Prize-winning author, said of him: "Allan Bloom was a true teacher, by which I mean he believed it to be monstrous that any of us should lose our souls through ignorance.
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