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NEWS
October 22, 1996
PRIME MINISTER Ryutaro Hashimoto was rewarded for calling Japan's election early by a return to power with a strengthened Liberal Democratic Party. With 239 seats in the 500-seat lower house, up from 211, the question is where he will find the coalition to provide a majority.If with the new, third-party Democrats, the price may be fealty to principles of reform that Mr. Hashimoto says he favors. But if sufficient defectors come in from the down-sized principal opposition party, New Frontier, there may be little price beyond patronage.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 3, 2014
Faith is making a comeback among liberal Democrats, but they still have a ways to go. First, some history. Hoping to attract some Evangelical Christian votes more than 20 years ago, former vice president Al Gore wrote that the biblical story of Noah and the Ark could be paraphrased in modern terms, "Thou shalt preserve biodiversity" ("Earth in the Balance" p. 245). Mr. Gore also claimed the first recorded instance of pollution was when Cain killed Abel and Abel's blood "falls on the ground, rendering it fallow" (p. 247)
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | July 27, 1992
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's governing conservatives forged a thumping parliamentary victory yesterday in postwar Japan's lowest-ever election turnout.Returns from voting for half the seats in the 252-member upper house of the Diet strengthened Mr. Miyazawa's drive to restore the politics-as-usual rule of old-line faction bosses in the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP).But the outcome was less a win for the Liberal Democrats than a failure of Japan's fragmented and internally rived opposition parties to tap into the scandal-weary people's steadily deepening disgust with all politicians.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
It's time for conservatives, Republicans, moderate Democrats and independents to end the liberal Democrats' one-party rule of Maryland. The latest example of that is Annapolis' reckless passage of the so called "Fairness for all Marylanders Act of 2014," which will permit men to share public bathrooms with women and girls ( "Assembly passes transgender rights bill," March 27). This foolish law will become effective on Oct. 1 and enough is enough already. We've seen liberal Democrats raise the gas tax, force small businesses to leave Maryland because of onerous regulations, impose a nickel bag tax at stores in Montgomery County and a rain tax on property owners, and run wealthy taxpayers out of the state.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
In a sign of how complex Maryland's budget difficulties are this year, both ends of the political spectrum in the Senate found themselves opposing the spending plan approved by the full chamber yesterday. For liberal Democrats, the $21.6 billion plan does too little, exchanging an income tax cut for deep cuts to Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposals for higher education and the environment. They also say it fails to meet the state's obligations for public schools. "When it comes to making political statements, I find parts of the budget shameful," said Sen. Paul G. Pinsky, a Prince George's County Democrat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 1998
TOKYO -- Politics took a turn to the usual here yesterday as the governing Liberal Democratic Party opted for political expedience and agreed to form a coalition with its archenemy, Ichiro Ozawa, and his Liberal Party.The alliance will strengthen the governing party's sway in Parliament, mollify its restive hard-liners and give it sure support in coming budget debates."I am happy that we have agreed to work together on various policies with strong cooperation in the parliamentary session and on the 1999 budget discussion," said Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, who signed the deal with Ozawa after 3 1/2 hours of talks yesterday.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Liberal Democrats began shaping their opposition yesterday to President Clinton's balanced budget deal with Republican leaders, asserting that the rich would benefit unfairly at the expense of modest-income Americans.The House Democratic leader, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, pressed the Clinton administration to specify how the benefits of tax cuts and the burdens of spending reductions would be distributed according to income.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 1996
TOKYO -- Results from Japan's national elections yesterday gave a major victory to the party that has dominated the country for most of the postwar era and that has been most reluctant to open up Japan to far-reaching change.Despite widespread suggestions in the last few years that Japan was on the verge of a quasi-revolution that would transform government, the economy and society, there now seems less chance than ever of dramatic changes anytime soon.After a record-low turnout, final results this morning gave the Liberal Democratic Party, which despite its name is the most conservative major political force in Japan, 239 seats in the 500-member lower house of Parliament, the key chamber.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
MARYLAND Republicans are strategizing in New York this week about how to re-elect President Bush this fall and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in 2006. Meanwhile, Maryland Democrats are at home, plotting the opposite. A group of liberal Democrats is organizing the Maryland Progressive Summit, scheduled for Oct. 2 in Columbia. Del. Peter Franchot of Montgomery County, one of the organizers, said he hopes to capitalize on Democrats' anger toward Bush this year and channel it toward the governor two years hence.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2000
WASHINGTON - The issue is being embraced by Hollywood stars, peace activists and liberal Democrats. But on the presidential campaign trail, the idea of taking more of America's nuclear missiles off hair-trigger alert has found favor with the conservative candidate. Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush has been outspoken in his support. His Democratic rival, Vice President Al Gore, has not commented directly on the issue. Citing the possibility of an accidental launch, Bush vowed to end the quick-firing abilities of the weapons, which can now be launched within 15 minutes.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
As soon as the Supreme Court struck down a key component of the Voting Rights Act ("Part of voting act tossed," June 26), the predictable outcry began from black and Hispanic groups, and the political left in general. A major concern for them is that certain states would attempt to redistrict in such a way that minority voting power would be reduced. Yet when our own state of Maryland (the California of the East as I like to call it ) and its progressive liberal leadership completely gerrymandered some voting districts not very long ago, I did not hear any outcry from these groups.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 16, 2012
Don't you find it odd that the word "extremism" seems to apply only to conservative Republicans? Terminology often drives political discourse, and those who control the terms often determine the outcome. Establishment Republicans have too often been uncomfortable in their own skin. When they win elections, they sometimes seem unsure of what to do next. Democrats never seem to have this problem. They operate according to their core convictions and are never considered extreme. Instead, they are moderate, even normal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
Terry Weldon Taylor, a former public affairs director of a Baltimore health center and veteran political operative, died Wednesday from complications of a stroke at Northwest Hospital. The Windsor Mills resident was 62. "I got to know him through the late Wendell H. Phillips, who was the pastor of Heritage United Church of Christ and had served in the Maryland House of Delegates. Terry had all of the political spirituality of that congregation," said City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke.
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | October 31, 2006
What can we expect from the next Congress? Despite the lack of a public blueprint comparable to Newt Gingrich's 1994 "Contract with America," there are some reliable signals. It promises to be a dramatic environment characterized by more heat than light, one in which politics consistently trumps policy. Don't bet on bipartisan agreements to slash the deficit or reform Medicare. Let's assume that the conventional wisdom is correct: The House will have a modest Democratic majority and the Senate will be nearly evenly balanced.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 20, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- And now for the definition-impaired, the meaning of the word naive: "deficient in worldly wisdom or informed judgment." There was plenty of that on display last week in Pittsburgh and Washington. At the annual National Conference of Editorial Writers Convention in Pittsburgh, Edward G. Rendell, Pennsylvania governor and former general chairman of the Democratic National Committee, addressed a group of pundits on the subject, "Will the Real Democratic Party Please Stand Up?"
NEWS
By MARK LEIBOVICH and MARK LEIBOVICH,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- On his increasingly difficult path to re-election, Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman keeps getting kissed. And not lovingly. Kisses mock Lieberman, the incumbent Democrat, all over Connecticut - on signs, on buttons, even on giant parade floats. They commemorate the one President Bush appeared to plant on his cheek after last year's State of the Union address, a symbol, in the eyes of Lieberman's liberal critics, of an unforgivable alliance in support of the Iraq war. "It's a `Godfather' kiss - one of those kisses that says, `I own you,'" said Edward Anderson, a supporter of Lieberman's Democratic primary opponent, Ned Lamont, who was distributing "kiss" buttons outside a Lieberman campaign event in Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1993
TOKYO -- Two centrist opposition leaders who hold the votes to determine who will run Japan's next government informed the country's perennial leaders, the Liberal Democrats, today that they will side with five opposition parties to form an opposition-led coalition.Barring any unpredictable 11th-hour snags, the development appeared to ensure the end of the Liberal Democrats' 38-year rule.Not since 1948 has Japan had a coalition government, and not since 1955, when it was formed, has any party except the Liberal Democrats ruled the country.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 1, 1995
Treasury Sec. Rubin wants to repeal hoary old regulation to enable U.S. banks to do everything Barings could.Polls show that American voters don't believe conservative Republicans any more than liberal Democrats.Key Democrats are willing to enact the balanced budget amendment as long as it is judicially unenforceable.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | June 3, 2006
Clarification In a recent column on legislation to expand Federal Housing Administration mortgages to more potential homebuyers, the maximum mortgage amount under the bill would be the median home price for any metropolitan area, but not to exceed the Fannie Mae-Freddie Mac limit, which is adjusted annually. The current limit is $417,000. An unusual Capitol Hill alliance of liberal Democrats, conservative Republicans, commercial banks, real estate brokers, ethnic group lobbies, homebuilders and mortgage brokers is pushing for legislation that could give thousands of first-time home purchasers a better deal than they get in the mortgage market today.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | May 26, 2005
IF THE SHARE of the black vote that goes to the Democrats ever falls to 70 percent, it may be virtually impossible for them to win the White House or Congress, because they long ago lost the white male vote and their support among other groups is eroding. Against that background, it is possible to understand Democrats' desperate efforts to keep blacks paranoid, not only about Republicans but about American society in general. Liberal Democrats, especially, must keep blacks fearful of racism everywhere, including in an administration whose Cabinet includes people of Chinese, Japanese, Hispanic and Jewish ancestry and two consecutive black secretaries of state.
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