Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLiberal Arts College
IN THE NEWS

Liberal Arts College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By George S. Bridges | June 20, 2008
A recent article in The Sun noted that two more local colleges, Loyola and Villa Julie, are soon to become universities. Both are examples of a national trend in higher education. In Washington state, a similar drift is occurring. Whitman College, where I am president, is the lone remaining liberal arts college in Washington. We view this as a great honor and an abiding responsibility. Are traditional liberal arts colleges at risk or in peril? Four years ago, the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education listed fewer than 100 liberal arts colleges with no graduate school where 80 percent or more of all graduates majored in liberal arts and sciences rather than in career-track disciplines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Rhoda Dorsey, the first female president of Goucher College, the longest-serving executive at the formerly all-women's school and its leader when it made the wrenching decision to enroll male students, died in her Cockeysville apartment Saturday, the school said. She was 86. "This is a sad moment for all of us," Sanford J. Ungar, Goucher's president, said in an email to faculty and staff. He expanded on the thought Sunday. "I have no doubt that she saved the college with the decision to go coed," Ungar said.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 4, 1999
TALK ABOUT transformation. When Carolyn Manuszak in 1966 took over a tiny (100 medical-secretary students), two-year school founded by a religious order, no one knew if it would survive. Today, Villa Julie is a healthy, private four-year liberal arts college with more than 2,000 full-time students.The credit belongs to Ms. Manuszak, a former nun who developed a unique objective for Villa Julie -- marry liberal arts to a curriculum driven by the job-skill demands of local businesses.As a result, Villa Julie is a regional leader in highly marketable degrees in advanced information technology and visual communication arts.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2012
The U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis ranked as the top public liberal arts college in the country, pushing its traditional rival, the U.S. Military Academy, with which it shared the top honors last year, into the No. 2 spot, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings. "We always compete against West Point and Air Force, but first and foremost we're partners," said Cmdr. William Marks, a spokesman for the academy. "It's always nice to be recognized as being on the top. " The Naval Academy remained anchored at No. 14 among all liberal arts colleges in the annual U.S. News rankings, released Wednesday, mirroring the steady performance of other Maryland schools.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
RENWICK JACKSON is back. I'd forgotten him for 20 winters. One February day in 1982, after a tempestuous dozen years as president of St. Mary's College of Maryland, Jackson walked away from his job and his marriage. He left behind many admirers and true believers, as well as bitter enemies. There seemed no middle ground in the world's estimation of Ren Jackson. Jackson also left behind a school "with the look and appeal of a private liberal arts college," I wrote then. Jackson, I said, had managed to turn the former St. Mary's Seminary Junior College into the "Swarthmore of public colleges."
NEWS
May 21, 1999
Playing to win on the football field and in the boardroom has resulted in the funding of the first endowed undergraduate professorship in the humanities at Western Maryland College.W. James Hindman, former WMC football coach and Jiffy Lube International Inc. founder, and his wife, Dixie, of Westminster were recognized last month at a trustee dinner as the principal donors of the Ralph and Dorothy John Professorship in the Humanities.Ex-president honoredThe Hindmans chose to honor former WMC President Ralph C. John and his wife, Dot, of Berlin, Md., in the naming of the professorship.
NEWS
April 19, 2009
THOMAS DILLON, 62 President of Thomas Aquinas College Thomas Dillon, the president of Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, Calif., who during his 18-year time in office defended the school's strict adherence to Catholic dogma and a curriculum emphasizing the "great books" of Western civilization, died Wednesday in a car accident in Ireland. Dr. Dillon was in Limerick, Ireland, to attend a meeting of the International Council of Universities of St. Thomas Aquinas. He was accompanied by his wife, Terri, who was hospitalized with minor injuries, according to a college spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
H. Samuel Case, a longtime Western Maryland College professor, has been named provost of the Westminster liberal arts college. A professor of exercise science and physical education who has taught at the college for 35 years, Case has served as acting provost since April. "I'm thrilled and humbled," said Case, 59, who lives in Westminster. His appointment to the college's second-highest administrative office is Joan Develin Coley's first major personnel change since she was elected WMC's president by the board of trustees in October.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
After a two-year legal battle over the estate of a wealthy Baltimore County alumnus, Dickinson College - a small, private liberal arts college in central Pennsylvania - will receive the largest charitable gift in its 220-year history, college President William G. Durden announced this week. Durden said the college will receive a multimillion-dollar gift as a result of the settlement of a lawsuit it filed in 2001 in Florida. The suit accused two Baltimore lawyers of persuading alumnus Robert A. Waidner to alter his will to benefit them and nonprofit institutions with which they were associated, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Concerned about Western Maryland College's recent announcement that the Westminster school wants to change its name, more than 800 current and former students, parents and friends of the private liberal arts college have signed an Internet petition to protest the proposed change. A college spokesman said last week that the petition won't influence Western Maryland's decision to change its name to one more reflective of its location and history. "We think it's the right decision," said Donald W. Schumaker Jr., a college spokesman.
EXPLORE
October 28, 2011
Officials at McDaniel College in Westminster said Friday, Oct. 28, that the college has been named on a list of "Best Value" colleges by Kiplinger's Personal Finance - the only Maryland liberal arts college to make the list. The rankings are available online at Kiplinger's website, and will be published in the magazine's December issue, which is actually circulated beginning Nov. 8. McDaniel came in at No. 92 among liberal arts college's nationwide. While the Westminster school was the only liberal arts college from Maryland on the list, three other universities from the state earned the "value" ranking: Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (No. 25)
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Mary Pat Seurkamp will retire as president of the College of Notre Dame after the 2011-2012 academic year, she announced Monday in a letter to the college's board of trustees. "Leadership requires us to build a strong foundation for the next generation of leaders," wrote Seurkamp, who will retire after her 15th year as president. "I certainly inherited an institution with a rich history, fine academic programs and a stellar reputation upon which we were able to lead Notre Dame to the next level of distinction.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
The U.S. Naval Academy has been named the nation's most popular liberal arts college, according to a ranking published by U.S. News & World Report magazine. The academy tops the magazine's popularity list of schools based on its yield — the number of accepted students who decide to enroll as freshmen. In the fall of 2009, 1,251 of the 1,464 students accepted to the Naval Academy chose to enroll, a yield of 85.5 percent. "We think this is indicative of the great opportunity the Naval Academy affords our nation's most talented and well-rounded young Americans to serve as leaders in the Navy and Marine Corps," Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller, superintendent of the academy, said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
April 19, 2009
THOMAS DILLON, 62 President of Thomas Aquinas College Thomas Dillon, the president of Thomas Aquinas College in Santa Paula, Calif., who during his 18-year time in office defended the school's strict adherence to Catholic dogma and a curriculum emphasizing the "great books" of Western civilization, died Wednesday in a car accident in Ireland. Dr. Dillon was in Limerick, Ireland, to attend a meeting of the International Council of Universities of St. Thomas Aquinas. He was accompanied by his wife, Terri, who was hospitalized with minor injuries, according to a college spokeswoman.
NEWS
By George S. Bridges | June 20, 2008
A recent article in The Sun noted that two more local colleges, Loyola and Villa Julie, are soon to become universities. Both are examples of a national trend in higher education. In Washington state, a similar drift is occurring. Whitman College, where I am president, is the lone remaining liberal arts college in Washington. We view this as a great honor and an abiding responsibility. Are traditional liberal arts colleges at risk or in peril? Four years ago, the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education listed fewer than 100 liberal arts colleges with no graduate school where 80 percent or more of all graduates majored in liberal arts and sciences rather than in career-track disciplines.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
Students earning diplomas from Maryland's colleges and universities this year are being sent off into the world with words of wisdom from the state's retiring U.S. senator, a congressman running to replace him, the director of the National Institutes of Health, the host of a nationally televised political roundtable and the vice president of the United States. Members of Goucher College's Class of 2006, however, will be treated today to insights from the bass player of Spinal Tap. The featured speaker is comedian, actor and author Harry Shearer, perhaps best known as the voices of malevolent business executive C. Montgomery Burns and his geeky, yes-man assistant, Waylon Smithers, on The Simpsons.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1997
Surpassing its own expectations, Goucher College in Towson has reached the $40 million goal set for its capital campaign two years early, with several $1 million contributions from notable alumni and supporters.The campaign -- launched in May 1996 and set to end in June 1999 -- has raised $40.3 million in gifts and pledges from more then 745 donors, the college announced yesterday.Contributors include Margot Birmingham Perot of Dallas, Class of 1955 and wife of billionaire Ross Perot, who donated $1 million for faculty salary support, and Alonzo Decker Jr., former chairman of Black & Decker Corp.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2005
An elegant umbrella stood watch over an empty Halloween cookie tin and a stack of jigsaw puzzle boxes. Faded jeans were piled next to a flirty pair of green suede shoes. Folding tables were awash with Campbell's soup cans, microwave popcorn and other mementos of late-night study sessions. College was officially over. Across Maryland last week, teary-eyed college students hugged each other goodbye and cleaned out their dormitories. Bunk beds were stripped; textbooks boxed up. Towels were pulled out of communal bathrooms.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
Colleges That Change Lives will hold a fair tomorrow for parents and students interested in exploring the opportunities at a variety of schools. The group, a consortium of 40 liberal arts schools across the country, grew out of a book written by former New York Times education editor Loren Pope, who looked at colleges that he says can provide similar opportunities for students as do "top-tier" universities. The Baltimore event - set to run from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Hunt Valley Marriott - will begin with an information session and then provide time for students and families to speak with admissions officers from the schools.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.