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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
Michael Douglas as the glittery Las Vegas pianist, Liberace, and Matt Damon as his young lover -- only HBO could have brought "Behind the Candelabra" to TV with this much style and care. Douglas, an Oscar winner, is something to behold in this role. Damon is rock solid. Steven Soderbergh directs, and the supporting cast is a jaw dropper by made-for-TV standards. Above is a a podcast preview I did with WYPR-FM (88.1) in Baltimore. Enjoy this holiday treat from HBO. I did. "Behind the Candelabra" premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday (May 26)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
HBO's Liberace film "Behind the Candelabra" was the highest rated premiere of a movie in the last nine years on the premium cable channel. And that's covering some very impressive ground, like "Game Change" and "You Don't Know Jack," to name a couple of made-for-TV movies on HBO in recent years. The first showing of the film at 9 p.m. Sunday drew 2.4 million viewers, according to Deadline. The last time any film did better was in May of 2004, when "Something the Lord Made," which was filmed in Baltimore, premiered to 2.6 million.
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Las Vegas -- Liberace. You know who I mean. Mr. Showmanship, bedecked in diamonds and furs, smiling to the crowd as he banged out some stripped-down, saccharine rendition of Tchaikovsky.Tuesday would have been the 76th birthday for the man from West Allis, Wis. He died in 1987 at his home in Palm Springs, Calif.I'll admit I've been fascinated by Liberace, and amused. Why else would I make a one-day, 360-mile round trip across the Mojave Desert -- Victorville, Calif., to Las Vegas and back?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
Michael Douglas as the glittery Las Vegas pianist, Liberace, and Matt Damon as his young lover -- only HBO could have brought "Behind the Candelabra" to TV with this much style and care. Douglas, an Oscar winner, is something to behold in this role. Damon is rock solid. Steven Soderbergh directs, and the supporting cast is a jaw dropper by made-for-TV standards. Above is a a podcast preview I did with WYPR-FM (88.1) in Baltimore. Enjoy this holiday treat from HBO. I did. "Behind the Candelabra" premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday (May 26)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Except for the most practiced and fortified Scrooge-y types, anyone with an ounce of delight in the Christmas season and its music will find the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's sixth annual Holiday Spectacular well worth a visit. Quibble, if you like, over the designation "spectacular," but when it comes to spirit and entertainment, the show still delivers. Question, if you like, some of the elements packed into the nearly two-hour production, but somehow, as in past years, it all holds together surprisingly well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | June 11, 2000
My grandmother had little time for, still less patience with, the frivolities of popular entertainment. A woman of fierce opinions, deep faith and formidable girth, she'd badgered her way out of Czarist Lithuania shortly after the turn of the century, crossing most of Europe to catch a Boston-bound steamer. Her children deferred to her; their children held her in the kind of awe only dark terror can inspire. But she loved television. Adored it. Paid it rapt homage at weekly trysts with New York variety show host Ed Sullivan, veteran comic Milton Berle, Roman Catholic Bishop Fulton J. Sheen -- and, most of all, Liberace.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
"The Spitfire Grill" The Spitfire Grill -- a musical about a young, female ex-con who moves to a small town and helps redeem its spirit along with her own -- will make its Baltimore premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre tomorrow. Based on a 1996 movie directed by Lee David Zlotoff, The Spitfire Grill has a book by James Valcq and Fred Alley, who wrote the music and lyrics, respectively. Bill Kamberger, who previously directed the musicals Passion, Parade and Street Scene at Fell's Point Corner, returns to direct a cast headed by Claire Bowerman and also featuring Matthew Bowerman (Claire's husband)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
In the more than 45 years since the Prime Rib opened, precious little has changed at the iconic midtown restaurant. Walking in is like stepping into a bygone era: Well-dressed diners carve into steaks the size of dinner plates while waiters in suits top off their wine glasses. The walls are black with gold trim; on them hang paintings, posters and framed covers of Vogue from the early 1930s. And who could miss that swinging '60s leopard print carpet? The Prime Rib has been around long enough to see its style fall in and out of fashion.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 10, 1994
Try to turn on a television set or radio between now and April 15 and avoid hearing Domenic J. LaPonzina.Go ahead and try.Domenic J. LaPonzina, 42, is the IRS Public Affairs Officer for the Baltimore District, which includes all of Maryland and the District of Columbia.A graduate of Calvert Hall High School, Towson State and Johns Hopkins, he covered the Spiro Agnew trial for ABC network news before joining the IRS in 1973.It has been said of Mr. LaPonzina, a fancier of classic cars, fine horses and exquisite suits, that he has so much savoir-faire that if he had any more savoir it just wouldn't be fair.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 4, 1996
MY FIRST NIGHT'S work for a newspaper, I was sent to interview Tiny Tim.He was the headliner for a Police Benevolent Association fund-raiser. I sat for about 15 minutes with him on folding chairs backstage at a high school auditorium in eastern Pennsylvania.It was not the saddest 15 minutes I've spent in journalism, though it may have been the most pitiful."Sixty-eight," he sighed, repeating like some mantra that year I had just asked him about. "Sometimes, I still think it's 1968. It's so strange.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
In the more than 45 years since the Prime Rib opened, precious little has changed at the iconic midtown restaurant. Walking in is like stepping into a bygone era: Well-dressed diners carve into steaks the size of dinner plates while waiters in suits top off their wine glasses. The walls are black with gold trim; on them hang paintings, posters and framed covers of Vogue from the early 1930s. And who could miss that swinging '60s leopard print carpet? The Prime Rib has been around long enough to see its style fall in and out of fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Except for the most practiced and fortified Scrooge-y types, anyone with an ounce of delight in the Christmas season and its music will find the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's sixth annual Holiday Spectacular well worth a visit. Quibble, if you like, over the designation "spectacular," but when it comes to spirit and entertainment, the show still delivers. Question, if you like, some of the elements packed into the nearly two-hour production, but somehow, as in past years, it all holds together surprisingly well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2005
"The Spitfire Grill" The Spitfire Grill -- a musical about a young, female ex-con who moves to a small town and helps redeem its spirit along with her own -- will make its Baltimore premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre tomorrow. Based on a 1996 movie directed by Lee David Zlotoff, The Spitfire Grill has a book by James Valcq and Fred Alley, who wrote the music and lyrics, respectively. Bill Kamberger, who previously directed the musicals Passion, Parade and Street Scene at Fell's Point Corner, returns to direct a cast headed by Claire Bowerman and also featuring Matthew Bowerman (Claire's husband)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 22, 2004
A part from its ineptitude, the most terrifying thing about Joel Schumacher's big-screen version of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical The Phantom of the Opera is its feckless junking of a classic nightmare figure. Alone among the old horror standbys, the Phantom of the Opera is a man among monsters - a disfigured musical genius who wreaks havoc in that most stylish of cultural haunts, the Paris Opera House. The idea behind the figure of the Phantom is that art is dangerous - as dangerous as sex is in vampire movies, and sometimes as sexy, too. In the marvelous 1925 silent production, Lon Chaney was a man so spectral that he was thoroughly believable as a perverted, desiccated muse - the spirit of romantic music gone rotten.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | June 11, 2000
My grandmother had little time for, still less patience with, the frivolities of popular entertainment. A woman of fierce opinions, deep faith and formidable girth, she'd badgered her way out of Czarist Lithuania shortly after the turn of the century, crossing most of Europe to catch a Boston-bound steamer. Her children deferred to her; their children held her in the kind of awe only dark terror can inspire. But she loved television. Adored it. Paid it rapt homage at weekly trysts with New York variety show host Ed Sullivan, veteran comic Milton Berle, Roman Catholic Bishop Fulton J. Sheen -- and, most of all, Liberace.
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG and TAMARA IKENBERG,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The gown is Vegas-lite -- form-fitting, flesh-colored fabric with curving strands of strategically placed beads.It's barely anything, and at the same time it's too much.The onlookers at Bob Mackie's fashion show at Neiman Marcus are buzzing. There's a familiar giddiness to the whispers. Only one word is clear: "Cher."Since he first joined forces with the performer on the "Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour" in the '70s, Mackie has been designing the showstoppers that helped make her a star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
HBO's Liberace film "Behind the Candelabra" was the highest rated premiere of a movie in the last nine years on the premium cable channel. And that's covering some very impressive ground, like "Game Change" and "You Don't Know Jack," to name a couple of made-for-TV movies on HBO in recent years. The first showing of the film at 9 p.m. Sunday drew 2.4 million viewers, according to Deadline. The last time any film did better was in May of 2004, when "Something the Lord Made," which was filmed in Baltimore, premiered to 2.6 million.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- William H. Ginsburg's specialty is medical malpractice, not criminal defense, and he became Monica Lewinsky's lawyer because of old family friendship, not professional expertise. But he is no stranger to high-profile cases and tense depositions."People who feel obliged to share everything they know in answer to a question really are poor witnesses," Ginsburg wrote in a 1990 article, "Preparing Depositions," for a legal publication called For the Defense."A technique sometimes used by plaintiffs' lawyers to attempt to prod a witness to volunteer information is the 'pregnant pause,' " Ginsburg wrote.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- William H. Ginsburg's specialty is medical malpractice, not criminal defense, and he became Monica Lewinsky's lawyer because of old family friendship, not professional expertise. But he is no stranger to high-profile cases and tense depositions."People who feel obliged to share everything they know in answer to a question really are poor witnesses," Ginsburg wrote in a 1990 article, "Preparing Depositions," for a legal publication called For the Defense."A technique sometimes used by plaintiffs' lawyers to attempt to prod a witness to volunteer information is the 'pregnant pause,' " Ginsburg wrote.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 4, 1996
MY FIRST NIGHT'S work for a newspaper, I was sent to interview Tiny Tim.He was the headliner for a Police Benevolent Association fund-raiser. I sat for about 15 minutes with him on folding chairs backstage at a high school auditorium in eastern Pennsylvania.It was not the saddest 15 minutes I've spent in journalism, though it may have been the most pitiful."Sixty-eight," he sighed, repeating like some mantra that year I had just asked him about. "Sometimes, I still think it's 1968. It's so strange.
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