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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Nicholas Piscatelli's annus horribilis seems to be extending into 2012. On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Appeals sided against the developer in a four-year-old libel lawsuit against Baltimore City Paper.  Meanwhile, his former megaclub, Redwood Trust , is still up for sale, and at half the price from when it was first listed six years ago. Last year, Piscatelli tried to auction off 200 E. Redwood, the nearly 130-year-old building...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Nicholas Piscatelli's annus horribilis seems to be extending into 2012. On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Appeals sided against the developer in a four-year-old libel lawsuit against Baltimore City Paper.  Meanwhile, his former megaclub, Redwood Trust , is still up for sale, and at half the price from when it was first listed six years ago. Last year, Piscatelli tried to auction off 200 E. Redwood, the nearly 130-year-old building...
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NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | August 28, 1995
THE GREAT LIBEL case of Jeffrey Masson against Janet Malcolm has taken a surprising new turn. It throws fresh light on a legal saga that has gone on for more than a decade. And it carries some important lessons about our law of libel and, especially, the judges who administer it.In 1980 Masson, a psychoanalyst, was appointed projects director of the Sigmund Freud Archive. Soon he said publicly that Freud had twisted his findings for personal gain. The archive fired him. He sued; a board member paid him off to settle the case.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
The Internet is not an especially civil place. A guy in Asia can spend his evening trashing a Canadian woman's home movies; students can spread malicious rumors about classmates for the world to see; and "editors" can add all manner of falsehoods to Mohandas Gandhi's Wikipedia page, just for kicks. In most cases, these ne'er-do-wells write vitriolic comments and blog posts anonymously, there are a few fighting words and the dustup dies down with minimal damage. Other times, men and women are emotionally, mentally, physically or monetarily hurt because of words published online, with little recourse - unless they can find out who their cyberbullies are. A lot has been said recently about Vogue model Liskula Cohen and her suit to discover the identity of a blogger who called her a "skank."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
A rift between two Sykesville women has escalated into a libel suit in which the woman who filed a criminal complaint against her neighbor is being sued for $4 million.The libel case, filed in Carroll Circuit Court last week, is considered a rarity by prosecutors and legal experts because of its ties to the criminal complaint. In Maryland and in most of the United States, comments made in court or in court proceedings -- such as filing a criminal complaint -- are generally considered privileged, which means the person uttering them usually cannot be sued.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1995
LONDON -- They're dragging Ronald McDonald into a libel trial. And Happy Meals. And two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.It's the McLibel Case. Goliath against David. The barristers in traditional black gowns and powdered wigs against a pair of radical environmentalists who dress in jeans and sweat shirts and forage for documents in dusty backpacks and used plastic bags.McDonald's Restaurants UK and McDonald's Corp. of the United States are suing Dave Morris and Helen Steel for libel because they participated in the production of a leaflet assailing McDonald's.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 29, 1995
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- For Prodigy Services Co., it seems, no good deed goes unpunished.The joint venture of Sears, Roebuck & Co. and International Business Machines Corp. long has staked out a position as the family-oriented on-line service, where computers and humans try strip obscene and offensive messages from its network.That policy came back to haunt White Plains, N.Y.-based Prodigy last week, when a New York state court judge found the company exercised editorial control and therefore must defend itself against a $200 million libel suit by Stratton Oakmont Inc. over comments "posted" by a Prodigy subscriber on a computer bulletin board.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The SunWashington Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Journalists and authors who deliberately make up quotes may be assessed heavy damages for libel, but only if the phony quotations harm the source's reputation and have a different meaning than the source intended, the Supreme Court ruled 7-2 yesterday.In its first-ever ruling on how libel law applies to intentional misquotation, the court compromised between taking away all constitutional protection for deliberately false quotes and allowing complete freedom to put quotes into sources' mouths.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1994
A Sykesville woman who was sued for libel after describing a neighbor in a criminal complaint as "vindictive" and an "alcoholic" who "abused her oldest stepson" has asked a Carroll judge to dismiss the $4 million lawsuit.In a motion filed recently in Carroll Circuit Court, Deborah Tracecalled the libel case groundless."The alleged libelous [defamatory] publication is absolutely privileged under Maryland Common Law," Daniel J. Bartolini, Ms. Tracey's attorney, wrote in the dismissal motion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Dealing another blow to Indonesia's embattled former leader, Suharto, a Jakarta court ruled yesterday that Time magazine did not libel him in an article that claimed Suharto and his family amassed a $15 billion fortune during his three decades in power. "According to the evidence, it is clear that the article was not fabricated, but was based on facts," said the ruling by a three-judge panel. The judges also said they respected the magazine's refusal to reveal its confidential sources.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | June 16, 2009
When Courtney Love fell into a dispute with a clothing designer earlier this year, she aired her beef on MySpace and Twitter. The designer sued Love for libel after the rocker claimed on her blog and in tweets that the designer was a thief, liar and drug dealer with a record of prostitution, according to court documents. Love's case is one of the high-profile libel lawsuits involving comments on social networking sites. But you don't have to be famous to be sued. As more of us blog or tweet whatever pops into our minds, we run the risk that someone somewhere may take offense - rightly or wrongly - and sue. You could end up with big legal bills - without Love's deep pockets.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Maryland's Court of Appeals issued a decision yesterday protecting the identity of three anonymous Internet posters and, for the first time, offering guidelines for state courts to follow in libel cases before unmasking online commenters. The opinion and instructions stem from a defamation lawsuit filed by Eastern Shore developer Zebulon Brodie against three unknown Internet posters and Independent Newspapers Inc., which runs an online community forum. The posters had written critical comments about the cleanliness of a Dunkin' Donuts that Brodie owns in Centreville.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
Maryland's highest court says that police officers can be sued for libel if they make false statements to obtain a search warrant, clearing the way for two members of the now disbanded Southwestern District "flex squad" to pursue a lawsuit against two other city officers who were investigating their conduct. The unanimous opinion, issued by the Maryland Court of Appeals on Wednesday, overturns a decision by Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock, who dismissed a $1.5 million lawsuit filed last year by Sgt. Robert Smith and former Detective Vicki Mengel.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2005
If Rafael Palmeiro is serious about pursuing a libel lawsuit against Jose Canseco, the truth would only be the beginning of his case. Not only would the Orioles slugger have to prove that what Canseco wrote in his new book, Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big, isn't true, but he'd also have to show, among other things, that Canseco knew it was false and that he was damaged by what was written. "It's not unwinnable, but it would be an uphill battle," Robert D. Lystad, a partner with the law firm of Baker & Hostetler in Washington who frequently defends the media in libel cases, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
SILVER SPRING - Cancer survivor Lance Armstrong is accustomed to sudden obstacles, both on the road and in his life. Yesterday, 19 days before going for a record sixth straight Tour de France title, Armstrong had to steer around a new impediment - both to his training regimen and possibly to his superhuman image - as he confronted suggestions that he used performance-enhancing drugs. In a soon-to-be published book, a former staff member on Armstrong's cycling team says he asked her to dispose of used syringes and lend him makeup to hide needle marks on his arms.
NEWS
By R. Thomas Berner | December 18, 2002
No man is an island, entire of itself; Every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main - John Donne (1624) AUSTRALIA MAY FIND itself isolated from the rest of the world if a Melbourne businessman unhappy with Barron's, a U.S. financial publication, wins his defamation case against the weekly Dow Jones newspaper in an Australian court. The offending publication was a story downloaded from the Dow Jones Web site in New Jersey. So why would someone sue in Australia instead of the United States?
NEWS
By Robert M. O'Neil | February 8, 1998
Every president from George Washington to Bill Clinton has probably wished that he could file a libel suit against the media for disseminating some outrageous falsehood about his personal official conduct.During the early days of the Clinton sex scandal, the public was flooded with media reports, some of which appear to be false. The report that a DNA-stained dress would topple the president seems to have been discredited. And the Dallas Morning News retracted its report that a witness might have caught Monica Lewinsky and the president in an intimate encounter.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
The location of Biospherics Inc.'s headquarters was incorrect in an article in yesterday's editions. The company is in Beltsville.The Sun regrets the error.A federal judge has thrown out a libel suit filed against the publisher of Forbes magazine by Biospherics Inc., a Columbia-based company which has developed a nonfattening sugar substitute.Biospherics filed the lawsuit against Forbes Inc. in July, contending that its stock price declined and the company had difficulty raising capital as a result of a column that appeared under the heading "Money & Investments," in the Jan. 13 issue of the business publication.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
In the evolving realm of Internet law, a ruling by Australia's highest court yesterday sent shudders through the electronic publishing world: A Melbourne businessman can sue Dow Jones & Co. for libel in Australia because its article about him reached his hometown via the Internet, profoundly altering the traditional bounds of publication, the court opined. Some in legal and publishing circles fear the decision could influence similar opinions in courts in Britain and elsewhere. "It will be the World-Fragmented Web," said Geoffrey H. Kuenning, an assistant professor of computer science at Harvey Mudd College near Los Angeles.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Dealing another blow to Indonesia's embattled former leader, Suharto, a Jakarta court ruled yesterday that Time magazine did not libel him in an article that claimed Suharto and his family amassed a $15 billion fortune during his three decades in power. "According to the evidence, it is clear that the article was not fabricated, but was based on facts," said the ruling by a three-judge panel. The judges also said they respected the magazine's refusal to reveal its confidential sources.
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