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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1992
BEIJING -- When Chinese Premier Li Peng meets tomorrow with global leaders at the unprecedented United Nations summit meeting in New York, it will represent another step in one of the world's most remarkable political comebacks.Only 2 1/2 years ago -- when the Chinese army slaughtered at least hundreds of pro-democracy demonstrators on Beijing's streets -- Mr. Li was widely reviled here and abroad as "the most hated man in China."Angrily declaring martial law in Beijing on Chinese TV just before that crackdown, he came across as stiff, dim and more than eager to do the dirty work of China's most conservative elders, to whom he owes his ascent to power.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
BEIJING - The head of China's national legislature, Li Peng, gave his last major speech as a central leader yesterday, effectively ending a long and contentious political career. Whatever his achievements as a legislator, Li will be forever despised here and abroad as the leader who announced the imposition of martial law in June 1989, signaling the army's arrival in Beijing to break up pro-democracy student protests around Tiananmen Square. In recent years he has also faced allegations of corruption and nepotism, particularly concerning the involvement of his wife and sons in state-owned power companies.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
BEIJING - The head of China's national legislature, Li Peng, gave his last major speech as a central leader yesterday, effectively ending a long and contentious political career. Whatever his achievements as a legislator, Li will be forever despised here and abroad as the leader who announced the imposition of martial law in June 1989, signaling the army's arrival in Beijing to break up pro-democracy student protests around Tiananmen Square. In recent years he has also faced allegations of corruption and nepotism, particularly concerning the involvement of his wife and sons in state-owned power companies.
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | March 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On the day after Vice President Gore lifted a glass of champagne to Premier Li Peng, the butcher of Tiananmen, a mid-level member of the Clinton administration's foreign policy team marveled at his bosses in the White House.''Is there any moral fiber left in these guys?'' he wondered. ''Does it bother them at all that Li Peng is utterly unrepentant for what he did at Tiananmen? Does it bother them that, when we talk about human rights and China we are talking about an emerging power's unwillingness to abide by fundamental norms of democracy?
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | March 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On the day after Vice President Gore lifted a glass of champagne to Premier Li Peng, the butcher of Tiananmen, a mid-level member of the Clinton administration's foreign policy team marveled at his bosses in the White House.''Is there any moral fiber left in these guys?'' he wondered. ''Does it bother them at all that Li Peng is utterly unrepentant for what he did at Tiananmen? Does it bother them that, when we talk about human rights and China we are talking about an emerging power's unwillingness to abide by fundamental norms of democracy?
NEWS
March 12, 1994
Secretary of State Warren Christopher finds himself in an awkward position this weekend as he arrives in China in the midst of a provocative roundup of liberal dissidents. If the Li Peng regime intended to create a scenario disruptive to Sino-American relations and cunningly designed to defy human rights standards, it has succeeded.The world now is treated to the spectacle of the top U.S. diplomat trying to lend credence to threats of jettisoning normal trading arrangements with China when, in fact, the Clinton administration wishes the whole issue would go away.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 11, 1995
BEIJING -- Chen Yun, one of China's most powerful Communist Party leaders and a leading opponent of the scope and pace of economic reforms in recent years, died yesterday at the age of 90, government officials confirmed today.A spokesman for the Chinese State Council said Mr. Chen, patron of China's hard-line Premier Li Peng, died in a Beijing hospital yesterday afternoon.The tough, outspoken Mr. Chen, a former typesetter in Shanghai and leader of the 1927 Shanghai insurrection, was a longtime ally of Chinese paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
By William Safire | August 30, 1993
Paris -- WHY ARE the world media so avidly covering the pudgy paunches of leaders on vacation?Granted, the return of Boris Yeltsin from his holiday retreat to harangue the rump Russian Parliament may be worth reporting.And the picture of Li Peng in bathing trunks deserves the space it got, because his reappearance in public means that hard-liners in Beijing have their champion back.But profiles of John Major lollygagging in Portugal? Details of Edouard Balladur's friendly dog, Titan, injuring a French bodyguard by bounding into him?
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1995
BEIJING -- With China's leader evidently too ill to influence events, there are hints that an official reassessment of the 1989 massacre of hundreds of anti-government protesters is now under way.Until now, the government's position has been that the demonstrations near Beijing's Tiananmen Square were caused by troublemakers who had to be crushed so that China could remain stable and grow economically. The protesters were killed by the army on the orders of senior leader Deng Xiaoping.But one of Mr. Deng's key supporters from that time, the head of the Beijing Communist Party, was stripped of his office last week on charges of corruption -- and criticized, albeit indirectly, for his role in crushing the Tiananmen protests.
NEWS
By GWYNNE DYER | March 4, 1992
London.- "We do not accept the Indian claim that [Kashmir] is part of India, and I daresay if you could get an honest reading of the positions of the Soviet Union and China you will find out just about the same,'' said Robert Oakley, U.S. Ambassador to India, last August.True enough, but Kashmir matters a great deal to India. The dispute over India's only Muslim-majority state, annexed in contro- versial circumstances in 1947, has been the trigger for two of India's three wars with Pakistan, and 3,700 people have been killed in the anti-Indian rebellion that has raged in Kashmir for the past two years.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1995
BEIJING -- With China's leader evidently too ill to influence events, there are hints that an official reassessment of the 1989 massacre of hundreds of anti-government protesters is now under way.Until now, the government's position has been that the demonstrations near Beijing's Tiananmen Square were caused by troublemakers who had to be crushed so that China could remain stable and grow economically. The protesters were killed by the army on the orders of senior leader Deng Xiaoping.But one of Mr. Deng's key supporters from that time, the head of the Beijing Communist Party, was stripped of his office last week on charges of corruption -- and criticized, albeit indirectly, for his role in crushing the Tiananmen protests.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 11, 1995
BEIJING -- Chen Yun, one of China's most powerful Communist Party leaders and a leading opponent of the scope and pace of economic reforms in recent years, died yesterday at the age of 90, government officials confirmed today.A spokesman for the Chinese State Council said Mr. Chen, patron of China's hard-line Premier Li Peng, died in a Beijing hospital yesterday afternoon.The tough, outspoken Mr. Chen, a former typesetter in Shanghai and leader of the 1927 Shanghai insurrection, was a longtime ally of Chinese paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
March 12, 1994
Secretary of State Warren Christopher finds himself in an awkward position this weekend as he arrives in China in the midst of a provocative roundup of liberal dissidents. If the Li Peng regime intended to create a scenario disruptive to Sino-American relations and cunningly designed to defy human rights standards, it has succeeded.The world now is treated to the spectacle of the top U.S. diplomat trying to lend credence to threats of jettisoning normal trading arrangements with China when, in fact, the Clinton administration wishes the whole issue would go away.
NEWS
By William Safire | August 30, 1993
Paris -- WHY ARE the world media so avidly covering the pudgy paunches of leaders on vacation?Granted, the return of Boris Yeltsin from his holiday retreat to harangue the rump Russian Parliament may be worth reporting.And the picture of Li Peng in bathing trunks deserves the space it got, because his reappearance in public means that hard-liners in Beijing have their champion back.But profiles of John Major lollygagging in Portugal? Details of Edouard Balladur's friendly dog, Titan, injuring a French bodyguard by bounding into him?
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | July 31, 1993
BEIJING -- A year and a half ago, China's paramount leader Deng Xiaoping toured southern China to launch his largely successful political drive to accelerate the country's shift to a market economy.Last week, Zhu Rongji, China's chief vice premier, embarked on his own tour of southern China -- a trip aimed at trying to rein in the financial excess, inflation and speculation that have risen along with the economic boom set loose by Mr. Deng.The one-two punch could broadly foreshadow the long-term course of Chinese politics.
NEWS
By GWYNNE DYER | March 4, 1992
London.- "We do not accept the Indian claim that [Kashmir] is part of India, and I daresay if you could get an honest reading of the positions of the Soviet Union and China you will find out just about the same,'' said Robert Oakley, U.S. Ambassador to India, last August.True enough, but Kashmir matters a great deal to India. The dispute over India's only Muslim-majority state, annexed in contro- versial circumstances in 1947, has been the trigger for two of India's three wars with Pakistan, and 3,700 people have been killed in the anti-Indian rebellion that has raged in Kashmir for the past two years.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | July 31, 1993
BEIJING -- A year and a half ago, China's paramount leader Deng Xiaoping toured southern China to launch his largely successful political drive to accelerate the country's shift to a market economy.Last week, Zhu Rongji, China's chief vice premier, embarked on his own tour of southern China -- a trip aimed at trying to rein in the financial excess, inflation and speculation that have risen along with the economic boom set loose by Mr. Deng.The one-two punch could broadly foreshadow the long-term course of Chinese politics.
NEWS
February 19, 1997
THE WORLD watches the deathbed -- if such it is -- of a 92-year-old man who has held no office since 1990 and not been seen in public for three years. China's President Jiang Zemin and Premier Li Peng rushed back to Beijing. Word went out unofficially -- officially denied -- that Deng Xiaoping, the Great Architect, was failing. A Hong Kong newspaper said he had a massive stroke.Perhaps he did. Stocks dipped on the Hong Kong stock exchange and plummeted on two little stock exchanges inside China.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1992
BEIJING -- When Chinese Premier Li Peng meets tomorrow with global leaders at the unprecedented United Nations summit meeting in New York, it will represent another step in one of the world's most remarkable political comebacks.Only 2 1/2 years ago -- when the Chinese army slaughtered at least hundreds of pro-democracy demonstrators on Beijing's streets -- Mr. Li was widely reviled here and abroad as "the most hated man in China."Angrily declaring martial law in Beijing on Chinese TV just before that crackdown, he came across as stiff, dim and more than eager to do the dirty work of China's most conservative elders, to whom he owes his ascent to power.
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