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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 23, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- If Ratuk Nawang's homeland is called "the land of snows," then his present home might be termed the land of unrelenting heat.Mr. Nawang was born in Tibet, a place he remembers as "a sort of nirvana -- cool, green and peaceful."But his home these days is a resettlement camp established for Tibetan exiles almost 30 years ago, a fetid warren of dusty shacks hard by the Yamuna River here where 110-degree temperatures are common this time of year.Today in Lhasa, Tibet's capital, Chinese authorities will attempt to celebrate -- amid extensive security precautions -- the 40th anniversary of the signing of the agreement by which Tibet came under China's dominance.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
SHANGHAI, China -- A group of foreign diplomats, including an official from the United States, completed a two-day visit to Tibet yesterday amid conflicting reports of renewed pro-independence protests there and a possible weapons cache and mass arrests at a Buddhist monastery in southwestern China. Late yesterday, Tibet's government in exile said that there were protests near the Jokhang Temple in the capital, Lhasa, and that parts of the city were shut down, Reuters reported. Several Lhasa residents reached by telephone, however, said they heard about a scuffle between police officers and peddlers in a food market.
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NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
BEIJING -- A Chinese shopkeeper in Tibet's capital came out of hiding yesterday for the first time since mobs ransacked his herb store last week during the biggest uprising against the region's Chinese rulers in nearly two decades. Ma Zhonglong, 20, said he had had nothing but a few packets of instant noodles to eat since he ran for cover Friday when he saw hundreds of Tibetans smash and burn storefronts near the Jokhang Temple, the religious and geographical heart of Lhasa, the Tibetan capital.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
BEIJING -- A Chinese shopkeeper in Tibet's capital came out of hiding yesterday for the first time since mobs ransacked his herb store last week during the biggest uprising against the region's Chinese rulers in nearly two decades. Ma Zhonglong, 20, said he had had nothing but a few packets of instant noodles to eat since he ran for cover Friday when he saw hundreds of Tibetans smash and burn storefronts near the Jokhang Temple, the religious and geographical heart of Lhasa, the Tibetan capital.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
BEIJING -- With the 40th anniversary of China's annexation of Tibet only six weeks away, Chinese plans to celebrate the date already are encountering some apparent opposition, according to recent reports from Tibet.In the last few days, there have been reports of a demonstration by pro-independence Tibetans in eastern Tibet and of the ransacking of an army-run arsenal in Lhasa, Tibet's capital.The one-day demonstration by more than 100 Tibetan monks, herdsmen and workers in Gongju County near Tibet's border with Sichuan Province was broken up by several hundred army troops, according to Chinese officials quoted by a Western news agency.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
SHANGHAI, China -- A group of foreign diplomats, including an official from the United States, completed a two-day visit to Tibet yesterday amid conflicting reports of renewed pro-independence protests there and a possible weapons cache and mass arrests at a Buddhist monastery in southwestern China. Late yesterday, Tibet's government in exile said that there were protests near the Jokhang Temple in the capital, Lhasa, and that parts of the city were shut down, Reuters reported. Several Lhasa residents reached by telephone, however, said they heard about a scuffle between police officers and peddlers in a food market.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | August 29, 1993
LHASA, China -- This remote, unwilling part of China is not a place you go to see for yourself as a journalist.Foreign reporters are seldom allowed to visit China's strategically important roof of the world, its buffer from South and Central Asia. The Chinese government invites you, escorts you, watches your every step, tries to hear everything you ask and control what you see and what you're told.Then they cite the visit as proof that Tibet is "open."Even so, they can't conceal the longing for independence and thehatred that many Tibetans continue to harbor for their Chinese rulers.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2008
XIAHE, China -- As undercover police prowled through crowds of pilgrims bedecked in traditional embroidered Tibetan costumes, the monk in the bright purple robe looked around to make sure no one was watching. Then he smiled defiantly and raised his fist. Hours earlier yesterday, in a new eruption of long-hidden Tibetan resolve and pride that has challenged the Beijing regime just months before it hosts the Summer Olympics, monks and ordinary Tibetans reportedly attacked a police station, overturned cars and raised a banned national flag in this holy city just outside the Tibet Autonomous Region.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 7, 1993
LHASA, China -- "Take it easy" isn't just an idle salutation here. It's a survival recommendation.The first day here government hosts are adamant -- no work, no walking, not even a lot of talking. The hotel room has a bottle of oxygen, drawn upon from a plastic tube through one's nostril.At night, a doctor comes by to take your blood pressure and offer some special Chinese herbs.The source of all the fuss is a much dreaded and somewhat common illness among visitors to Tibet, high altitude sickness.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks | January 29, 1992
FOR NO APPARENT reason, Tasha, a purebred Lhasa Apso, spent more than a year gnawing and licking at her back legs, keeping the area constantly raw and irritated. It may have been stress.An otherwise healthy, happy 4-year-old, Tasha rules the roost in her Harford County home, which she shares with her owners, Cindy and John Smith, and their 7-year-old son, John Joseph Smith IV, who is better known as "L.J." The young family, who reside in Street, live with Mrs. Smith's mother, Betty Brown.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2008
XIAHE, China -- As undercover police prowled through crowds of pilgrims bedecked in traditional embroidered Tibetan costumes, the monk in the bright purple robe looked around to make sure no one was watching. Then he smiled defiantly and raised his fist. Hours earlier yesterday, in a new eruption of long-hidden Tibetan resolve and pride that has challenged the Beijing regime just months before it hosts the Summer Olympics, monks and ordinary Tibetans reportedly attacked a police station, overturned cars and raised a banned national flag in this holy city just outside the Tibet Autonomous Region.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 7, 1993
LHASA, China -- "Take it easy" isn't just an idle salutation here. It's a survival recommendation.The first day here government hosts are adamant -- no work, no walking, not even a lot of talking. The hotel room has a bottle of oxygen, drawn upon from a plastic tube through one's nostril.At night, a doctor comes by to take your blood pressure and offer some special Chinese herbs.The source of all the fuss is a much dreaded and somewhat common illness among visitors to Tibet, high altitude sickness.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | August 29, 1993
LHASA, China -- This remote, unwilling part of China is not a place you go to see for yourself as a journalist.Foreign reporters are seldom allowed to visit China's strategically important roof of the world, its buffer from South and Central Asia. The Chinese government invites you, escorts you, watches your every step, tries to hear everything you ask and control what you see and what you're told.Then they cite the visit as proof that Tibet is "open."Even so, they can't conceal the longing for independence and thehatred that many Tibetans continue to harbor for their Chinese rulers.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks | January 29, 1992
FOR NO APPARENT reason, Tasha, a purebred Lhasa Apso, spent more than a year gnawing and licking at her back legs, keeping the area constantly raw and irritated. It may have been stress.An otherwise healthy, happy 4-year-old, Tasha rules the roost in her Harford County home, which she shares with her owners, Cindy and John Smith, and their 7-year-old son, John Joseph Smith IV, who is better known as "L.J." The young family, who reside in Street, live with Mrs. Smith's mother, Betty Brown.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 23, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- If Ratuk Nawang's homeland is called "the land of snows," then his present home might be termed the land of unrelenting heat.Mr. Nawang was born in Tibet, a place he remembers as "a sort of nirvana -- cool, green and peaceful."But his home these days is a resettlement camp established for Tibetan exiles almost 30 years ago, a fetid warren of dusty shacks hard by the Yamuna River here where 110-degree temperatures are common this time of year.Today in Lhasa, Tibet's capital, Chinese authorities will attempt to celebrate -- amid extensive security precautions -- the 40th anniversary of the signing of the agreement by which Tibet came under China's dominance.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 23, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- If Ratuk Nawang's homeland is called "the land of snows," then his present home might be termed the land of unrelenting heat.Mr. Nawang was born in Tibet, a place he remembers as "a sort of nirvana -- cool, green and peaceful."But his home these days is a resettlement camp established for Tibetan exiles almost 30 years ago, a fetid warren of dusty shacks hard bythe Yamuna River here where 110-degree temperatures are common this time of year.Today in Lhasa, Tibet's capital, Chinese authorities will attempt to celebrate -- amid extensive security precautions -- the 40th anniversary of the signing of the agreement by which Tibet came under China's dominance.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 23, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- If Ratuk Nawang's homeland is called "the land of snows," then his present home might be termed the land of unrelenting heat.Mr. Nawang was born in Tibet, a place he remembers as "a sort of nirvana -- cool, green and peaceful."But his home these days is a resettlement camp established for Tibetan exiles almost 30 years ago, a fetid warren of dusty shacks hard bythe Yamuna River here where 110-degree temperatures are common this time of year.Today in Lhasa, Tibet's capital, Chinese authorities will attempt to celebrate -- amid extensive security precautions -- the 40th anniversary of the signing of the agreement by which Tibet came under China's dominance.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | May 25, 1993
BEIJING -- A major protest erupted yesterday in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, with at least 1,000 demonstrators throwing stones at government buildings and police responding with tear gas and perhaps gunfire, Western travelers from there said last night.The unrest, which began yesterday morning and continued into the evening, was provoked by price increases and taxes, the Westerners said in telephone interviews.But it also likely was aimed at the bitter issue of Chinese rule of the Himalayan region, for Sunday marked the anniversary of China's "peaceful liberation" of Tibet in 1951 -- which many Tibetans still view as an illegal invasion of their homeland.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
BEIJING -- With the 40th anniversary of China's annexation of Tibet only six weeks away, Chinese plans to celebrate the date already are encountering some apparent opposition, according to recent reports from Tibet.In the last few days, there have been reports of a demonstration by pro-independence Tibetans in eastern Tibet and of the ransacking of an army-run arsenal in Lhasa, Tibet's capital.The one-day demonstration by more than 100 Tibetan monks, herdsmen and workers in Gongju County near Tibet's border with Sichuan Province was broken up by several hundred army troops, according to Chinese officials quoted by a Western news agency.
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