Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLgbt Community
IN THE NEWS

Lgbt Community

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
One day in the fall of 2010, Scott Marder, a partner at the law firm of Duane Morris in Baltimore, received a cold call from a young lawyer in Maryland seeking advice. The lawyer had found Marder's name in a directory maintained by the National LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) Bar Association. "He had all these questions to ask and nobody to answer them," Marder recalled. "Should you be out at work? Do your clients care? What about co-workers? Does it affect your career progression?
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The acting executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore has dropped her bid to become the organization's permanent head, even as the search to fill the spot continues. Kelly Neel's announced departure from the GLCCB, effective Oct. 3, surprised the group's board of directors, which had short-listed her as a finalist among a narrowing pool of contenders for the permanent job, said Mike McCarthy, the board's president. McCarthy said there were "points of contention" between the board and Neel, but he didn't think "it was at the level that she felt her value was questioned.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Heather Mizeur | July 15, 2013
There was much to celebrate when the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) last month. The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and its allies have worked long and hard to end discrimination based on sexual orientation, and the court's decision to end DOMA was a great leap forward in the fight against injustice. While we celebrate, we must not forget that just one day earlier the court also struck a major blow to equality, tearing down key parts of the Voting Rights Act, which ensures that minority communities have a voice in America's legislative bodies.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Looks like Baltimore's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community could have a big, flashy, deep-pocketed new ally in town in Horseshoe Casino on Russell Street, which opened Tuesday. These days it's not uncommon for major corporations to tout their support for the LGBT community, but not all are as effusive in that support as Horseshoe's parent company, Caesars Entertainment. If you scroll to the bottom of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's website, there is a list of 13 links for business and corporate information about the casino's slots and table games, hotels and local "things to do," and investor relations.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts offered an open hand to the LGBT community at a hate-crime forum in Mount Vernon on Thursday night, saying he wants to stand "shoulder-to-shoulder" with community members to improve officers' interactions with them on the ground. "We're here to be open, we're here to engage, we're here to be part of the community -- all parts of the community," Batts said. The event, held at the Waxter Center as part of this week's Baltimore Black Pride celebration, drew a small crowd -- organizers said the rain probably kept some away -- but had a large presence from the police department, with the department's top brass heavily represented.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Knocking down the barrier preventing federally-recognized same-sex marriages just doesn't have the same punch it used to. Edith Windsor, the 84-year-old woman whose legal fight ended with the Supreme Court declaring the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, took the number three spot in Time magazine's annual Person of the Year contest . The top Person of the Year honors went to Pope Francis , the first non-European leader of...
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | March 3, 2014
In my last Baltimore Sun op-ed column , I noted that Baltimore's mayors often have their eye on anything but being the mayor of Baltimore. Obviously, the column struck a nerve with the current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. In her response , Rawlings-Blake did nothing to counter my claims that she is more focused on her job as Secretary of the Democratic National Committee than she is with being Mayor of Baltimore. Almost as if to prove my point about how her eye is off the ball, I refer you to Sunday's episode of Meet the Press , in which the mayor was one of the guests on the political panel.
FEATURES
By Andy Wolt | June 11, 2013
Some of you may recognize me from my SpaceManAndy advice column in City That Breeds. Well, I've decided to focus my efforts here, on the LGBT community. As a gay man living in Baltimore, I'm here to answer any and every question you can throw at me. Sometimes it just helps to get a little third party perspective. Your friends might tell you what you want to hear, but I will give you my honest opinion on what's best. I mean, I don't even know you, I wouldn't even know how to placate you. You can write in with questions on all sorts of topics.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Kinera Royster wants to be known more for her talents than her appearance. "There is more to me than being a man who wears heels and a wig," she said as she sifted through a clothing rack containing 11 garments she designed. Royster, a self-taught designer, showcased her collection of clothes Thursday night at Red Maple in Fashion Alley, an event that featured gay, lesbian, transgender and gay-friendly models and designers. The first ever event in Baltimore served as a kick-off to this weekend's annual Gay Pride celebration.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
His eccentricity, boundary-pushing bravado and brilliant knack for flamboyance could have all made it so on their own, but it was perhaps Robin Williams' way of taking up queer characters with just the right balance of warmth and pitch-perfect irreverence that made us love him most. Yes, Williams -- gay cabaret owner in "The Birdcage" and the one-and-only dad-in-drag "Mrs. Doubtfire," among other favorites -- was an icon for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community just as much as he was a cherished persona for anyone in the world who loves comedy and could tell a genius of the form when they saw one. Williams' death by suicide this week was no doubt more cutting for many in the LGBT community because of the support he'd shown for them and theirs , decades before many of their own family and friends would do the same.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Yesterday, in the wake of the second murder of a transgender woman in Baltimore in the last two months , Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts held a press conference to convey a commitment to solving the crime and improving police relations with the transgender community. Los Angeles Clippers shooting guard Reggie Bullock also started tweeting about 26-year-old Mia Henderson's death, saying she was his "brother," and the case -- which city police had clearly sought to shine a spotlight on -- became the subject of international news.
NEWS
Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Friends say Mia Henderson had only recently moved back to Baltimore when she became the victim of a homicide this week in Northwest Baltimore. Henderson was found in a Hanlon-Longwood neighborhood alley early Wednesday, killed by "severe trauma," police said. Henderson's brother, Reggie Bullock, is a shooting guard for the Los Angeles Clippers, and her death became national and international news Thursday in part because of that connection. Police say the killing of Henderson, 26, a transgender woman, bears similarities to the killing of another transgender woman named Kandy Hall, 40, about a month ago in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Black- and copper-colored beads lay around a puddle of blood in a Northwest Baltimore alley where police said a transgender woman was killed early Wednesday in a crime that bore similarities to the slaying of another transgender woman last month. Baltimore police are investigating whether the death of Mia Henderson, 26, is connected to the killing of Kandy, whose body was found June 3 in a field in Northeast Baltimore. Both were found during the early morning, and police have no suspects in either case.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore police acknowledged Wednesday afternoon that a homicide victim found early Tuesday in a field in Northeast Baltimore was a transgender woman, but details surrounding the case remained scarce. Police said Tuesday night that a man had been found dead that morning at 6:30 a.m. in the 1400 block of Fillmore St., near the U.S. Post Office in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood. They identified the victim as Ricky Carlos Hall, of the 4000 block of Raymonn Ave. Police confirmed on Wednesday afternoon that Hall was a transgender woman who was known as "Kandy.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
On NBC's “Meet the Press” today, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake invited gay and lesbian residents of Arizona to move to Baltimore. Asked about vetoed legislation that would have allowed businesses in Arizona to refuse to provide service to gay and lesbian residents, Rawlings-Blake said it “burns [her] up” that people still face discrimination in 2014. She acknowledged the western state likely has better weather than Baltimore, but said the city has a more welcoming attitude toward homosexual residents.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore police acknowledged Wednesday afternoon that a homicide victim found early Tuesday in a field in Northeast Baltimore was a transgender woman, but details surrounding the case remained scarce. Police said Tuesday night that a man had been found dead that morning at 6:30 a.m. in the 1400 block of Fillmore St., near the U.S. Post Office in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood. They identified the victim as Ricky Carlos Hall, of the 4000 block of Raymonn Ave. Police confirmed on Wednesday afternoon that Hall was a transgender woman who was known as "Kandy.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
I really can't tell you why in the last 12 months, I became venomous about Maryland politicians. I've voted for each one of the incumbents on my ballot, and I would like to rescind my vote but I don't know why. Maybe it is because I decided to never vote again unless the Supreme Court was fired and all elected officials were boxed into limited terms. Even the ones I have loved and admired. And then last October, I received an email from a young lady in the neighborhood who was having a meet and greet for Del. Heather Mizeur.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.