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NEWS
September 20, 2002
ACROSS PUBLIC housing projects in West Baltimore, they left their mark. Scrawled on walls were the initials "LTB," the moniker of brazen young thugs whom federal authorities have charged operated as a gang of drug-dealing thieves and killers. They left their mark in the streets, six men shot dead allegedly at the hands of the leaders of the Lexington Terrace Boys. And there's more, according to a federal grand jury investigation led by the U.S. attorney's office, federal agents and city detectives: kidnapping, witness tampering, car thefts, cocaine sales and arson carried out with large-caliber guns.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Donnie Andrews' life is one that David Simon and Ed Burns would have had to invent if he hadn't already lived it. "I am the real Omar," Andrews tells me by way of introduction, referring to how he was the inspiration for the ruthless yet moral stickup man in the Simon and Burns HBO series "The Wire. " Omar Little didn't make it through "The Wire's" five-season arc. He was shot to death in the final season — as was a member of his crew, Donnie, who was played by Andrews himself in a bit part.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Angry that the Housing Authority of Baltimore City has not completed all repairs necessary for ending a rent strike at Lexington Terrace, residents set up a picket line at the West Baltimore complex this week.The residents were to attend a hearing yesterday on the 2-month-old strike. But District Judge Theodore Oshrine postponed the hearing after the authority admitted it had not completed repairs, an attorney for the residents said.Sally Gold, a private attorney hired by the authority, contended the agency has made most of the repairs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 25, 2008
Walter James Ennals, a retired city recreation leader for whom a West Baltimore basketball court was named, died of cancer June 17 at Joseph Richey Hospice in downtown Baltimore. The Catonsville resident was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised by his grandparents in Cambridge, he joined the Works Progress Administration during the Depression and moved stones in a quarry to earn money for college. He was a 1939 graduate of Morgan State University, where he earned a biology degree. After service in the Navy during World War II, he worked briefly at Bethlehem Steel Co. At his stepfather's urging, he changed jobs and became recreation director at Lexington Terrace, a former public housing development.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Fed up with unsafe and unhealthy living conditions, 67 residents of Lexington Terrace placed their February rents in escrow accounts yesterday, holding back $6,800 from their landlord -- the Housing Authority of Baltimore City.About 370 Lexington Terrace residents, who pay rents that range from $36 to $500 a month, did not participate in the strike.By their action, the strikers hope to prod management to make long-needed repairs or relocate them from the complex's five high-rises into generally safer low-rise public housing units, said Marla Hollandsworth, a University of Baltimore law professor who directs a group of UB law students who are representing the tenants.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
As part of the effort to rebuild the former Lexington Terrace Apartments, the city Board of Estimates has approved long-term lease agreements for $1 a year for the site where public and senior subsidized housing has been built. The city gave the Lexington Terrace Senior Housing Limited Partnership a 55-year lease on the land and the Lexington Terrace Townhomes Limited Partnership a 50-year lease last week. The developers received the deal because companies that build public housing are entitled to such benefits under city, state and federal law, said Arthur Gray, an executive assistant in the housing department.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 25, 1996
Demolition of the five high-rise building at the Lexington Terrace public housing complex in West Baltimore is set for 10 a.m. Saturday, and will wake about secopnds to complete, city officials said.The streets near the site will be closed to vehicles and pedestrians from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The area is bounded by Greene Street on the east, Calhoun Street on the west, Baltimore Street on the South and Franklin Street on the north.The public may view the demolition from Baltimore Street at Fremont Avenue, Lexington Street at Greene Street and Saratoga Street at Greene Street.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer Staff photographer Amy Deputy contributed to this article | January 28, 1993
A crew of cleanup workers swept through the blighted Lexington Terrace public housing project in West Baltimore yesterday, two days before the arrival of a special one-night tenant -- Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.The mayor is scheduled to visit the project tomorrow evening to speak with tenants about the rundown conditions they live with. But he may not see the worst.Maintenance crews from the Housing Authority were dispatched the project from other jobs yesterday to haul away tons of trash, board up broken windows and vacant apartments and sweep up dirt, they said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
U.S. Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros made an unannounced visit to one of Baltimore's worst public housing projects yesterday and ordered immediate federal assistance to restore its blighted high-rises.On his first trip to a U.S. city since taking over the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Mr. Cisneros arrived at Lexington Terrace in West Baltimore after walking through the rejuvenated Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood.His mood turned somber as he dodged puddles of water in the leaky, trashy stairwells of a high-rise at 734 W. Fayette St. and walked through hallways reeking of urine.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
An armed robbery suspect who tried to elude pursuing city and housing authority police by hiding in a trash bin at the Lexington Terrace homes was shot to death when he exchanged gunfire with the officers, a city police spokesman said.None of the three officers involved was injured. The dead man's name was withheld pending notification of relatives.Agent Robert W. Weinhold Jr., the spokesman, said Southeastern District Officers Wilie Heard, 26, and John Kelley, 23, and Housing Authority Officer Carl Anderson, 29, were responding about 4 p.m. to a 911 call of a robbery in progress in the 200 block of N. Dallas Court.
NEWS
February 19, 2007
Wyatt Thomas Coger, a longtime Baltimore educator who was tapped to reform one of the city's toughest middle schools and later was a professor at Coppin State University, died of colon cancer Wednesday at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 62 and a resident of Lewisberry, Pa. During a 33-year career in Baltimore's public schools, he had assignments in four elementaries - Stewart Hill, Montebello, Abbottston and Lexington Terrace - and Harlem Park Middle School. He served as a teacher, education specialist and an assistant principal and principal.
NEWS
By Scott Waldman and Scott Waldman,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
A federal judge sentenced two Baltimore gang members yesterday to life in prison without parole for a series of drug-related homicides that began in 1999 and included the killing of one witness. Michael L. Taylor, 20, and Keon D. Moses, 21, were members of the Lexington Terrace Boys, a violent gang named for the public housing where its members were raised. A nearly four-month trial in U.S. District Court this year resulted in the convictions of Moses and Taylor on multiple charges - including murder and drug distribution - stemming from their efforts to establish territory in the city's drug trade.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
A federal jury rejected the death penalty and recommended life sentences yesterday for two West Baltimore men who carried out a string of brutal homicides - including one witness killing - as they staked out territory in the city's drug trade under the name of the now-razed public housing complex where they grew up together. The government's case against Michael L. Taylor, 20, and Keon D. Moses, 21, marked the first time since 1998 that U.S. prosecutors in Baltimore had sought a federal death sentence.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
AT 15, Michael L. Taylor faced an audience at a state-run boot camp for teen-age offenders and promised never to hurt anyone again. It was a promise he didn't keep, couldn't keep. Today, at age 20, he sits in a federal courtroom in Baltimore, listening to the story of his life, a tale of drugs and deprivation that may save him from an executioner's syringe. Mr. Taylor, along with several boyhood friends, sold crack cocaine and killed to protect their West Baltimore turf in the impoverished neighborhood of the now-demolished Lexington Terrace housing project where they lived.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
When the high-rises came down, in a 20-second implosion eight summers ago, it seemed possible that the demolition of Lexington Terrace also could erase the cycle of brazen drug dealing, gunplay and early death long attached to the troubled housing project. For Michael L. Taylor and Keon D. Moses, though, the deadly bonds of Lexington Terrace held fast. 2000 June 27, 2000: Victim: Cortez "Man Man" Bailey, 18. Authorities say Bailey was shot to death by Foster in retaliation for the shooting of another member of the Lexington Terrace Boys.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
In his years as a city detective, Edward P. Burns helped send to federal prison some of the worst drug dealers to come out of Baltimore's west-side housing projects. He took a turn on the other side yesterday, testifying as a defense witness about the hopelessness and violence that pervaded the Lexington Terrace apartments. Burns, now a producer and writer for HBO's Baltimore-based crime drama The Wire, described killings carried out in the middle of the day, barren apartments used as "shooting galleries" for heroin addicts and young boys who came of age viewing the drug trade as their only career path.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
C Baltimore's partnership with Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse to transform the dilapidated Lexington Terrace development prompted a new round of criticism yesterday over the selection of contractors for high-profile projects.For the third time this year, the Housing Authority of Baltimore City has come under fire for its methods and its choice of a contractor that did not offer the lowest price.Critics questioned the hurried selection of Struever Bros. as the lead developer with the city in a proposed $68 million overhaul of Lexington Terrace, a cramped, worn public housing high-rise on the west side.
NEWS
By Tia Matthews and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Big Bird, Cookie Monster and the other Sesame Street characters will visit Lexington Terrace in West Baltimore during the next four years as part of a new program designed to prepare children for school.The Sesame Street Preschoolers Educational Program will give day care providers the skills needed to educate preschoolers, supporters said as the program was introduced at City Hall last week. Using books and Sesame Street shows, teachers from Maryland Public Television also will give parents in the public housing development tips on educating their children.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
A day after attorneys for Michael L. Taylor and Keon D. Moses argued that the men's hardscrabble childhood in a West Baltimore public housing development should spare them a federal death sentence, a key witness for the government testified yesterday that the two never seemed to him to be wanting. Aaron Butler, who also spent part of his childhood in the Lexington Terrace apartments, said he met Taylor and Moses about a decade ago, when Taylor was 10, Moses was 11 and Butler was 13. Life in the high-rises then was filled with danger and drug dealing, but Butler said that from his vantage, Taylor and Moses were not the worse for it. If anything, Butler said, Moses seemed to benefit from an older uncle's well-known drug-dealing operation.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
As federal prosecutors asked a jury yesterday to recommend death sentences for two members of a murderous West Baltimore drug ring, defense lawyers put on trial the troubled Lexington Terrace housing project where the men grew up and for which they named their gang. The violence-riddled high-rises, demolished in 1996, were a "living hell" where children feared gunfire as they walked home from school and faced little hope of finding a legitimate way out of poverty, defense attorney Carroll McCabe said in opening statements in the penalty phase of the federal case against Keon D. Moses and Michael L. Taylor.
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